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Thread: Hooray for Bing (search engine) perhaps chewing away at Google

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
    Posts
    12,256

    Hooray for Bing (search engine) perhaps chewing away at Google

    Had my son tell me he thinks Bing is better than Google and today I am thinking he may have a point.

    I am trying to get in touch with a friend my Dad had in Germany that was a survivor of the war. I have his telephone number but its not being answered.

    So i started searching to see if anything would pop up. Nothing relevant via google but low and behold punch same kind of search criteria into Bing and boom found this article.

    Translation and snippet below courtesy of google translate

    He even mentions the communication between my Dad (Bill Keeble) and him.

    So i have sent off an email to the newspaper to see if the writer (Anne Muller) has by chance his contact details or knows of his situation. He is 94 so anything could have happened. It still amazes me how the web has made things possible. We shall see what happens.

    found another guy that was a shipmate of my Dads in Peterborough, he had recently (1 month ago) moved from his home to a retirement home and I had no idea so web helped to find a naval association in Peterborough and they kindly hooked me up.

    I think my Dad would have wanted these fellows to know of his passing so its worth the effort in my view.

    Apologies for the enormous font I tried all i could to reduce it but our editor does not seem to want to allow it to go smaller.

    http://www.bergedorfer-zeitung.de/pr...ein-Leben.html

    Sinking of the "Bismarck"

    70 years ago, Otto Peters swam for his life

    Reinbek. Men's swimming for their lives. She desperately grab rope hanging from a lift. Otto Peters has looked at the photo in a magazine from 1952 countless times.From Anne Müller


    The inclusion of a British soldier represents the worst hour of his life. On the side he picked Magazine has framed a face with a red pen. It is his. At 22 he has to face with death. "Five yards were between the deck and the icy rough waters - five meters between salvation and destruction," he recalls. Hundreds did not make it on the 27th and remained May 1941 back in the icy Atlantic.
    Otto Peters was saved. Today, the native Curslacker lives with his wife Inge (84) in Reinbek, in a small apartment with a view of the wild coupling on the road Sophie. He is one of five surviving witnesses of the sinking of the "Bismarck". Above the dining table in the living room is on a shelf, a small model of the "Bismarck", a large black and white photo of a warship on the wall. Boats and motors have captivated the boy from the same early age. "As a farmer, I did not want to work, bring the animals to the slaughterhouse -. I could not have done" He goes to the Hanseatic Motor Company in Bergedorf, is mechanical engineer. 1939 is convening. In autumn, the training at the Naval Academy in Kiel follows. In May 1940, the machinery corporal is reassigned to the "Bismarck".
    "A better command would not happen to me," says Peters. He comes to Hamburg, to his hometown.The task of his division is monitoring the four diesel engines of the E-1 engine room End of August 1940 moves the "Bismarck" to the first test drive in the Baltic Sea. Peters sleeping mat hangs with 119 more in a big mess deck. He feels safe on the then most modern and largest battleship. "It was considered unsinkable, while my father had said then, 'the bigger the ship, the more easily it can be taken,'" the now 92-year-old. The preview of the father's idea to come true. In March 1941, the second test begins in the Baltic Sea. The ship never comes back.
    On 19 May runs the battleship "Operation Rhine Exercise" from. For sleeping, the young sailor comes just hours. "On the ship prevailed until the downfall war march state," said Peters. "Four hours guard followed four hours and then return to the vigil Vorwache. Doing so, we were able to put us in a hammock in the living deck. Before the next station," he says. "I was never tired, but still hungry. Our food was very, very bad."
    Over the intercom learns Peters on 23 May that the Bismarck had been discovered when breaking through the Denmark Strait. "There was great excitement," he describes the atmosphere on board.Then the announcement: "We take action!" A little later Kills shake the ship. As is known, that the "HMS Hood" was sunk, Peters mood is clouded, "I knew that Hood was the most powerful ship in the British Navy, you would now put it all determined to destroy us.". On the same day attack torpedo planes. A few days later, the steering gear is met and jammed. "Then it transpired that the ship could still only go in circles."
    In the stormy night before 27 May 1941 followed by a squadron of British warships, the "Bismarck". At midnight the ship reporting system transmits an address by the Fleet Commander, Admiral Günther Lütjens in all stations. "He has clearly given to understand that there is no escape. Around 4 clock, the English association would have us surrounded," said Peters recalls. He vigil. "I wanted to have really not true and could not imagine that we will go under. I clung to it, that help comes from somewhere already," Peters intelligent blue eyes are clouded by the thought of the night. There is a way out for any of the over 2000 people. "On a warship, there are no lifeboats," said Peters.
    He remains at his post eight feet deep in the hull.What he may have felt it retains the graceful senior after 70 years for himself. Admiral Lütjens had ordered to defend the NUC for a torpedo attack ship until the last grenade. From 8.47 clock grenades hit the ship. Otto Peters lucky that the board alarm system is spared in its range of hits. He hears against 10 clock the last command of Admiral Lütjens: "All hands aboard by ship is blown up!"
    Peter struggles through ammunition lifts, cable shafts and semi-bound Scots. Again and again the ship is rocked by strikes. It is completely dark everywhere. "We had to feel the outputs." He takes refuge with a group in the battery cover. "I was already standing chest deep in the water." A direct hit beats into the room. "I could not see how many died there." Before a Luk accumulates a mass of people. "We were standing in a row. From the front one by one 'Junak' key screamed. I passed my by."The hatch can be opened, but it is warped. Peters must leave his jacket to get through with the lifejacket.
    "All of a sudden it was as bright as day, we could see again., The ship had already flip side," says Peters. He sees many dead. Groups of people swimming in the water. He does not feel fear. "We are so excited." He lies flat on the deck. Tried to cling to. Wind nine lashes on the lake. "In the second breaker I was worn out. My first thought was, I have to leave the ship, so I do not get into the maelstrom."
    He is a good swimmer. After a few meters, he looks back. The "Bismarck" rises steeply from the water and slowly sinking with the bow upward. Peters mobilized all its forces. "I was not afraid. Survive and I wanted my mom and see my girl again." He drives about two hours in the sea. "The swim was mechanical. To conserve power, I went several times to the back and let myself drift with my life jacket." The fuel oil from the ship floating on the water, making breathing difficult, penetrating into the mouth, nose and ears. Suddenly he sees a ship silhouette. When he realizes the English flag on the cruiser "Dorsetshire", he thinks only, "it was all over - I was afraid that they're shooting at us."
    When he swims closer cautious, he recognizes countless ropes. As one of the first to reach the "Dorsetshire". On the crest of the wave he wants to hang on one of the cables. "I thought it is quite easy, but then I realized that it was only the life jacket that kept me afloat. I hardly had any strength." The high waves propel him up almost to the curb, but also always pull him back from the ship's side off. The fingers are frozen. Again and again, slipping the rope. The third time he wraps it around the thigh.Than the high shaft drives him, he pulls it tight. Two sailors pull him on deck. In the crew he gets a blanket and warm clothing.
    "We were treated incredibly fair, like brothers," says Peters. He is grateful to his rescuers today. From 1952 until two years ago there were countless meetings and reunion of the survivors with former enemies. With an Englishman, Bill Keeble, connects him to this day a friendship. But still the war is not over. Amidst the horror wins at least on the "Dorsetshire" humanity. "The English have us well supplied, force-fed gallons of tea for us, until we vomited the many fuel is swallowed. Two did not drink. Did you mean that the English want to poison us," Peters recalls. For this error they have to pay two years later in captivity with their lives.
    cheers

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,448
    Didn't want to edit your post Rob, so just copied it and made it a little larger.

    Reinbek. Men's swimming for their lives. She desperately grab rope hanging from a lift. Otto Peters has looked at the photo in a magazine from 1952 countless times.From Anne Müller



    The inclusion of a British soldier represents the worst hour of his life. On the side he picked Magazine has framed a face with a red pen. It is his. At 22 he has to face with death. "Five yards were between the deck and the icy rough waters - five meters between salvation and destruction," he recalls. Hundreds did not make it on the 27th and remained May 1941 back in the icy Atlantic.
    Otto Peters was saved. Today, the native Curslacker lives with his wife Inge (84) in Reinbek, in a small apartment with a view of the wild coupling on the road Sophie. He is one of five surviving witnesses of the sinking of the "Bismarck". Above the dining table in the living room is on a shelf, a small model of the "Bismarck", a large black and white photo of a warship on the wall. Boats and motors have captivated the boy from the same early age. "As a farmer, I did not want to work, bring the animals to the slaughterhouse -. I could not have done" He goes to the Hanseatic Motor Company in Bergedorf, is mechanical engineer. 1939 is convening. In autumn, the training at the Naval Academy in Kiel follows. In May 1940, the machinery corporal is reassigned to the "Bismarck".
    "A better command would not happen to me," says Peters. He comes to Hamburg, to his hometown.The task of his division is monitoring the four diesel engines of the E-1 engine room End of August 1940 moves the "Bismarck" to the first test drive in the Baltic Sea. Peters sleeping mat hangs with 119 more in a big mess deck. He feels safe on the then most modern and largest battleship. "It was considered unsinkable, while my father had said then, 'the bigger the ship, the more easily it can be taken,'" the now 92-year-old. The preview of the father's idea to come true. In March 1941, the second test begins in the Baltic Sea. The ship never comes back.
    On 19 May runs the battleship "Operation Rhine Exercise" from. For sleeping, the young sailor comes just hours. "On the ship prevailed until the downfall war march state," said Peters. "Four hours guard followed four hours and then return to the vigil Vorwache. Doing so, we were able to put us in a hammock in the living deck. Before the next station," he says. "I was never tired, but still hungry. Our food was very, very bad."
    Over the intercom learns Peters on 23 May that the Bismarck had been discovered when breaking through the Denmark Strait. "There was great excitement," he describes the atmosphere on board.Then the announcement: "We take action!" A little later Kills shake the ship. As is known, that the "HMS Hood" was sunk, Peters mood is clouded, "I knew that Hood was the most powerful ship in the British Navy, you would now put it all determined to destroy us.". On the same day attack torpedo planes. A few days later, the steering gear is met and jammed. "Then it transpired that the ship could still only go in circles."
    In the stormy night before 27 May 1941 followed by a squadron of British warships, the "Bismarck". At midnight the ship reporting system transmits an address by the Fleet Commander, Admiral Günther Lütjens in all stations. "He has clearly given to understand that there is no escape. Around 4 clock, the English association would have us surrounded," said Peters recalls. He vigil. "I wanted to have really not true and could not imagine that we will go under. I clung to it, that help comes from somewhere already," Peters intelligent blue eyes are clouded by the thought of the night. There is a way out for any of the over 2000 people. "On a warship, there are no lifeboats," said Peters.
    He remains at his post eight feet deep in the hull.What he may have felt it retains the graceful senior after 70 years for himself. Admiral Lütjens had ordered to defend the NUC for a torpedo attack ship until the last grenade. From 8.47 clock grenades hit the ship. Otto Peters lucky that the board alarm system is spared in its range of hits. He hears against 10 clock the last command of Admiral Lütjens: "All hands aboard by ship is blown up!"
    Peter struggles through ammunition lifts, cable shafts and semi-bound Scots. Again and again the ship is rocked by strikes. It is completely dark everywhere. "We had to feel the outputs." He takes refuge with a group in the battery cover. "I was already standing chest deep in the water." A direct hit beats into the room. "I could not see how many died there." Before a Luk accumulates a mass of people. "We were standing in a row. From the front one by one 'Junak' key screamed. I passed my by."The hatch can be opened, but it is warped. Peters must leave his jacket to get through with the lifejacket.
    "All of a sudden it was as bright as day, we could see again., The ship had already flip side," says Peters. He sees many dead. Groups of people swimming in the water. He does not feel fear. "We are so excited." He lies flat on the deck. Tried to cling to. Wind nine lashes on the lake. "In the second breaker I was worn out. My first thought was, I have to leave the ship, so I do not get into the maelstrom."
    He is a good swimmer. After a few meters, he looks back. The "Bismarck" rises steeply from the water and slowly sinking with the bow upward. Peters mobilized all its forces. "I was not afraid. Survive and I wanted my mom and see my girl again." He drives about two hours in the sea. "The swim was mechanical. To conserve power, I went several times to the back and let myself drift with my life jacket." The fuel oil from the ship floating on the water, making breathing difficult, penetrating into the mouth, nose and ears. Suddenly he sees a ship silhouette. When he realizes the English flag on the cruiser "Dorsetshire", he thinks only, "it was all over - I was afraid that they're shooting at us."
    When he swims closer cautious, he recognizes countless ropes. As one of the first to reach the "Dorsetshire". On the crest of the wave he wants to hang on one of the cables. "I thought it is quite easy, but then I realized that it was only the life jacket that kept me afloat. I hardly had any strength." The high waves propel him up almost to the curb, but also always pull him back from the ship's side off. The fingers are frozen. Again and again, slipping the rope. The third time he wraps it around the thigh.Than the high shaft drives him, he pulls it tight. Two sailors pull him on deck. In the crew he gets a blanket and warm clothing.
    "We were treated incredibly fair, like brothers," says Peters. He is grateful to his rescuers today. From 1952 until two years ago there were countless meetings and reunion of the survivors with former enemies. With an Englishman, Bill Keeble, connects him to this day a friendship. But still the war is not over. Amidst the horror wins at least on the "Dorsetshire" humanity. "The English have us well supplied, force-fed gallons of tea for us, until we vomited the many fuel is swallowed. Two did not drink. Did you mean that the English want to poison us," Peters recalls. For this error they have to pay two years later in captivity with their lives.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,017
    If you paste it into Notepad first to scrub the formatting, then copy and paste it onto the forum, it comes out OK:

    Reinbek. Men's swimming for their lives. She desperately grab rope hanging from a lift. Otto Peters has looked at the photo in a magazine from 1952 countless times. From Anne Müller...

    And Rob, you're right. The Internet has made a lot of amazing things possible. I'm not much of a Bing fan, but I'll have to start playing with it more to see how it's changed in the last few years.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  4. #4

    Bill Keeble from Johannesburg South Africa?

    Hallo Rob, Robert as I use to call you as a kid. I have searched many times on the net to find uncle Bill who I respectfully remembered as a second father and as a child almost believed he sank the Bismarck on his own. He had a big display in the foyer of his house of the historic event. His wife Yvonne, a very kind woman!! Just want to confirm that you are the person I am looking for?? I am the blond girl from Durban and is Heidi Britz, now Fourie. heidif@iafrica.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
    Posts
    12,256
    Hello Heidi, wow, amazing way to connect after all these years.
    Yes, i am the Robert , that you know. My Dad passed 3 years ago and Yvonne passed last year.
    I will write you via your email lots to catch up on.
    Wow never ever thought this post would enable someone to find me.
    cheers

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