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Thread: Brisket time!

  1. #1
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    Brisket time!

    Since I'm out of school jail on monday, a brisket sounds good! 11lbs so I have every intention of starting it sunday night. The question is...temp and time? Trim or no trim?
    Mucho thanks!
    Your Respiratory Therapist wears Combat boots

  2. #2
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    although Im not supposed to eat brisket, my wife or sisterinlaw will make one this coming jewish holidays, and I look forward to it more than anything else on the menu.
    couldn't help you with the trimming or heat, Im just a diner.
    Human Test Dummy

  3. #3
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    I'd trim it some if there are some really thick pieces of fat but wouldn't get overly worked up about it. I like to start warm (~400f) and then drop temperature to around 220-250. If you keep the humidity up you'll have a hard time overcooking it at that temp so cook it until it falls apart probably 1 to 1.5 hours per lb should be close. Personally I'd brine it ahead of time, but then I like to brine everything

  4. #4
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    Question. What is this brine stuff? I think of brine as a salt bath/pack, like for canning pickles. Is it the same as marinate?
    ++++++

    Some say the land of milk and honey; others say the land of fruits and nuts. All together my sort of heaven.

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  5. #5
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    I typically trim fat to about 1/4" to 3/8", there's usually a large chunk between the flat and the point (http://www.cookshack.com/store/Smoki...es/Brisket-101) that I will cut mostly out. The fat is where most flavor comes from, so don't cut it all out.

    I typically rub mine, then smoke on the grid at 225* for about 5 hours spritzing with apple or grape juice every 15 minutes, then I'll transfer to a pan and cover tightly with a little beer poured in the bottom for steam. Cook until it hits about 185-190. Then wrap it up tightly in foil, a towel around it, and set it in a cooler for about an hour. To be honest, I will usually cook in the smoker until I pan the brisket, then move it to the kitchen oven inside as I don't have to watch the fire/temp as closely using the oven. Cooking time is about 10 to 12 hours total.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carol Reed View Post
    Question. What is this brine stuff? I think of brine as a salt bath/pack, like for canning pickles. Is it the same as marinate?
    Yep - salt + water == brine. You can also add other seasonings like brown sugar or spices. An extreme example of a brined and spiced brisket is corned beef, its been left in longer than a normal "brine" though and the salt has had time to start changing some of the protein structures. Brining adds moisture and breaks down some proteins in the meat making it more tender. The moisture slows the temperature rise somewhat as well (due to evaporative cooling) which means the meat will hold at lower temps longer (good cooker temperature control obviates some of that advantage). A short brine would be comparable to just getting some salt on it and perhaps a bit deeper into the flesh than you would get from a rub.

    Meat brines are usually somewhat less salty than a pickle brine would be. The amount of salt would vary somewhat depending on what you're cooking. I don't use the same recipes/exact amounts that these folks do: http://www.amazingribs.com/cooking_w...s_conversions/ but its close. I prefer a smidge less salt, maybe 5% for what they call a "wet" brine and a bit more for a "dry".

    I would consider a marinate to be more than a brine, although there are so many things that can go into a marinade that its hard to specifically pin down a real definition and I suppose a brine could legitimately be considered a subclass of a marinade.

    Brining brisket is considered perhaps a bit controversial because the meat is generally pretty fatty so most claim it doesn't add as much value in that regard and that it "makes the meat less meaty". I won't argue that point as I haven't done enough both ways to have a really strong opinion on brisket. I do expect the purists to start throwing stones at me for suggesting it

    I can definitively say that if you brine leaner meats like chicken or turkey before cooking it the lip smacking factor is definitely multiplied

    Regardless of what meat it is, if you brine you do need to pat it dry and then let it air dry off for 30m-1hour after you take it out of the salt bath so that the skin (pellicle) reforms and it takes up smoke good.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Mooney View Post
    Personally I'd brine it ahead of time, but then I like to brine everything
    Are you sure you would brine beef? I'm only used to using it for pork and chicken. And then for every 3 quarts of water, add 3/4 c. Kosher salt and 1/4 c. sugar

  8. #8
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    Let me get caught up here!! First...this sucka is getting cut in half...it's 20" long and the label shows where to cut it...scary!!
    Carol/Sharon - the brine I've been using is a one-zy...1 gallon of water, one cup of sea or kosher salt and 1,2,3 cups of apple juice.
    Carol...make sure that your meat isn't brined already!! You'll see stuff like "Saline (0.9% salt) Added" of "Flavor(salt) Injected". If this is the case...you won't gain any flavor or moisture by brining, the diffusion gradient has been met and no fluid will move. BUT!! You sure can inject with fun flavors, and again, I like apple juice or white grape juice...or mix the two!
    I'm going to do the flat and save the mid and point for later; after all it's just the two of us, unless Allen decides on a sky trip...we have a spare room and a really big TV!!

    Thanks for the help so far....any thoughts on cutting into sections?
    Your Respiratory Therapist wears Combat boots

  9. #9
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    I trim em up use a dry rub. smoke at 240-250 Fat side up in an open pan until internal temp at 190-200. I also like to use a mop sauce every hour or so. Keepen the fat up cause it to self baste. then I' cover and let rest in the oven.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  10. #10
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    Getting braver here. I bought the brisket, but its going into the freezer because I don't time for this for the next few days. I still have to finish assembling the smoker and season it. I'm in last days here and crunched for time. In October more experimentation will occur. But I want to get the smoker dirty before the Dowells show up.
    ++++++

    Some say the land of milk and honey; others say the land of fruits and nuts. All together my sort of heaven.

    Power is not taken. It is given. Who have you given yours to? Hmmmm?

    Carol Reed

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