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Thread: Goose Unisaw from 1940's vs a 1-1/2 hp or 2hp Powermatic 66 form the 50's?

  1. #1

    Goose Unisaw from 1940's vs a 1-1/2 hp or 2hp Powermatic 66 form the 50's?

    I will be building me a 12x20 garage for storage, I hope to carve out me a little space to do some woodworking I am wondering what would be the best old arn table saw to get for my new garage it will replace my RAS. I am looking at getting a goose egg unisaw with a 3/4hp to 1hp motor or and old Powermatic 66 with and 1 1/2 hp or 2hp motor. I will building me a set of kitchen cabinets for my first house and some furniture.

  2. #2
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    My vote is for the Powermatic 66 I had one in my production shop and it was a real work horse and I loved that saw. I now have a UniSaw and HATE it. Look for at least 3hp in the 66 I dont think they made that model with anything smaller. It just a more comfortable saw to work at. Find one with a Biesemeyer fence and you will be a HAPPY man.
    A Turn N Time
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  3. #3
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    Jay

    I'm trying to understand why you don't like your Unisaw. As far as I know the PM differences are a deeper table by 2". & a heavier trunnion the throat plate I think is positioned differently.

    I have nothing against the PM & yes I do have a Unisaw with a Grizzly Biesemeyer style fence & 3 HP motor.
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
    "If it ain't round you may be a knuckle dragger""Turners drag their nuckles too, they just do it at a higher RPM"Bart

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bart Leetch View Post
    Jay

    I'm trying to understand why you don't like your Unisaw. As far as I know the PM differences are a deeper table by 2". & a heavier trunnion the throat plate I think is positioned differently.

    I have nothing against the PM & yes I do have a Unisaw with a Grizzly Biesemeyer style fence & 3 HP motor.
    One of the problems with the UniSaw is mine is a right tilt (to dangerous) I have the Uni-Fence and just dont care for it. Its to hard to set and keeps coming out of it locking point every time you move it and just dose NOT work smooth like the Biez. The Blade is also at a different distance from the front of the saw than the 66. I found the 66 to be a lot more comfortable to operate and the Switch is in a better location the Uni is just Wrong in my opinion and thats all it is,is an opinion
    A Turn N Time
    Components for John Smith Organs and the Hobby Organ Builder

    Frog Pond Guitars


    Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

  5. #5
    The older model 66's was 2hp or 1-1/2hp.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Jackson III View Post
    The older model 66's was 2hp or 1-1/2hp.
    Didn't know the 66 came with that small of motor I think I would look for one with a 3hp you wont regret it.
    A Turn N Time
    Components for John Smith Organs and the Hobby Organ Builder

    Frog Pond Guitars


    Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

  7. #7
    I see.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Caughron View Post
    One of the problems with the UniSaw is mine is a right tilt (to dangerous) I have the Uni-Fence and just dont care for it. Its to hard to set and keeps coming out of it locking point every time you move it and just dose NOT work smooth like the Bies. The Blade is also at a different distance from the front of the saw than the 66. I found the 66 to be a lot more comfortable to operate and the Switch is in a better location the Uni is just Wrong in my opinion and that's all it is,is an opinion

    I think that's where the other 2 inches were used in front of the throat plate. As to the right tilt I was raised with Craftsman left tilt so I understand how you feel.

    I scooted my fence rail over to the left just over 24" so I can move the fence to the left of the blade & rip with the blade tilted away from the fence. Heck that Bies style 52" Grizzly fence system has to be worth something. I am still able to rip lower cabinet sides with the fence on the right side of the blade. I also mounted the switch to the left of the saw with a knee board shut off.

    When I get into a new shop I also have the 1950's Gold addition Craftsman TS that was my Dad's. I wish I had $10 for each piece of material Dad cut or ripped on this saw. I hope to set up both saws out-feeding onto a common table.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails A1 myshop 002.jpg   1953 Delta Unisaw 030.jpg  
    Last edited by Bart Leetch; 09-21-2013 at 03:41 AM.
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
    "If it ain't round you may be a knuckle dragger""Turners drag their nuckles too, they just do it at a higher RPM"Bart

  9. #9
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    another vote for the 66 but the uni's have a large following to..
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
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  10. #10
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    I've got a Powermatic 65 (predecessor to the 66) and love it. If you happen across one, it may be worth a look. That said, there are some other choices if you want a serious saw with a small footprint. Atlas, older Craftsman, Walker Turner, Duro, and i believe Davis Wells all made cabinet saws with the motor under the table (not hanging out the back). There was also a DeWalt badged version of one of the Atlas models. Great saws. The "Junior Unisaw" is also a great machine, albeit with an 8" blade. We found one for my Dad, and after using it, he kicked his 10" Delta out the door. He doesn't rip 4" material on his table saw, and the Uni Jr. handled 3" thick stock a lot better than his newer 10" saw. I'm not recommending any of these options over the two you listed, but i wouldn't exclude them if you came across one in decent condition.
    They all cut wood, and well when tuned up. I have my preferences, but shy away from the "Ford vs. Chevy" debates. They all have their strengths and weaknesses. A lot may just depend on what you find. Expanding to include other good options might help.
    Good luck with the hunt.

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