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Thread: Beers and Ales in USA

  1. #1
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    Beers and Ales in USA

    Well a Canuck can easily be spotted in the grocery checkout in the USA, just look for the people with no food and loads of booze.

    Man the prices here are cause for clebration so i bought a few beers i aint tried before to sample while on holiday.

    So first up is a beer called Red Hook. Bought a sampler pack
    Here is one i am trying
    Click image for larger version. 

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    This is the color very dark but actually suprisingly smooth and nice. Not a harsh flavor. Had one that was very hoppy this afternoon.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  2. #2
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    Red hook is a pretty good brand. Bud only owns about 35% of the craft beer alliance they belong to!
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
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  3. #3
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    Re: Beers and Ales in USA

    Thats interesting news i was thinking the "water" beer brands like bud etc must be feeling some pinch given what i see is a craft beer invasion of their former dominant position. I love competition in a free market.


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  4. #4
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    Red Hook makes some pretty decent beers, I wouldn't kick them out of my ice chest if they happened to show up there anyway

    I find the associations of color and taste to be interesting (not totally unwarranted mind you but not absolute) and make a few beers that defy expectations one way or another. Its interesting to have people taste them with their eyes closed first A lot of what people don't like about a lot of dark beers is a few of darker grain flavors primarily malt bitterness (which largely comes from grains in the mid-high end of darkness, although there are some that don't have it). The worst offender is "chocolate" malt; which while it may sound delicious has a flavor that can most charitably be described as bad diner coffee. A lot of what throws a lot of commercial beers off in this regard is they get cheap on the medium roast malts (which are more expensive than the base grains) and try to make up the color with a smaller amount of really dark malt. This ruins the body and leaves you with a thin, astringent and bitter (not in a good way like hops.. I love hops) beer. Also some people just don't like thicker bodied beers which are often associated with darker beers (but again there are exceptions you can have dark/light body and light/heavy body beers as well ).

    Unsurprisingly a rather larger % of the "craft marketed" brews on the shelves are either wholly or partially owned by the majors so they are definitely reacting to market forces. Having said that the craft brewer market share is still tiny but growing:
    - The craft brewing sales share in 2012 was 6.5% by volume and 10.2% by dollars.
    More fun facts on that here: http://www.brewersassociation.org/pa...atistics/facts

    The craft brewing sales share in 2012 was 6.5% by volume and 10.2% by dollars.

    A "short" list of craft breweries is also available from the brewers association: http://ba.brewersassociation.org/mem...x?memtype=BREW
    I can't decide if its a good or a bad thing how many I recognize from the first page

    If you weren't aware Bud is now owned by InBev - although I guess they are calling it AB-inBev inbev basically bought AB so its mostly marketing to keep part of the AB name (sheesh 5 years ago, time flies!) - who own some amazingly large share of the market - http://www.ab-inbev.com/pdf/AB_InBev...ToBusiness.pdf 48% US and 41% Canada. You can see most of their brands here: http://www.ab-inbev.com/go/brands/br...cal_brands.cfm

    Rob, you should definitely take up homebrewing Its actually a really good way to start learning the different flavor and how they come about and what you do/don't like in more specifics (also you end up with beer!). A few years back me and a couple of buddies brewed all 28 major styles in a single year (using mostly http://www.amazon.com/Brewing-Classi.../dp/0937381926 and the bjcp guidelines http://www.bjcp.org/stylecenter.php) which was highly educational about all of the different styles and how they end up. We've also done "style tasting classes"where people bring in several examples of a specific style and everyone compares it to the baseline - although I don't really brew always to specific styles - its still useful have a common vocabulary to try and figure out your own preferences and describe what you like.

  5. #5
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    Ryan is definitely the expert, but I've always been amused by the association of 'strong beers' being darker. It's quite possible to make a very 'strong' beer, alcohol wise, that is quite light in color.

    It's also quite possible to make what could be considered a very light in flavor and alcohol that is pretty dark in color.

    Speaking of which, It's time to start on a pumpkin ale!
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Dowell View Post
    Ryan is definitely the expert, but I've always been amused by the association of 'strong beers' being darker. It's quite possible to make a very 'strong' beer, alcohol wise, that is quite light in color.
    I hear that all the time as well, I've quit even trying to correct most people on that one (boy I had 2 glasses of guiness is that stuff strong its 4%). The other one I hear all the time is "this ones old, I've had it for like 10 years, its going to be extra strong!!" (granted many beers that survive well are strong, but most old beer is just stale ).

    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Dowell View Post
    Speaking of which, It's time to start on a pumpkin ale!
    I seem to recall you did one of those last year as well? I've had a few good ones and a few not-so-good ones the good ones are pretty darn good.

  7. #7
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    Re: Beers and Ales in USA

    If i take on as many hobbies as you too i will find myself living alone

    I really would like to give home brewing a try but i dont drink enough beer.
    I also prefer to have company to drink with especially a decent beer. SWMBO HER name for now.... dont drink beer unless drowned out dead in sprite or 7up.

    Ryan thanks for the links.

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  8. #8
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    Try a Smuttynose Rob. I don't drink beer very often but I like these.
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Keeble View Post
    Well a Canuck can easily be spotted in the grocery checkout in the USA, just look for the people with no food and loads of booze.
    Heh - loml just reminded me of a game we used to play at the Costco on Maui when we lived there called "tourist or local". Some were easy - two bags of rice and three cases of TP - local, the case of chocolate mac nuts three bottles of tequila - tourist. Other times it was more challenging like a cart full of booze and chips.. could be a local having a party or tourist .. having a party.. at that point we'd look at how they walked, hawaiian shuffle - local.. uncomfortable in flip flops or wearing socks.. tourist.

    Where we cross the line going up to the family you can spot the returning Canucks by the shopping carts full of butter

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Mooney View Post
    I seem to recall you did one of those last year as well? I've had a few good ones and a few not-so-good ones the good ones are pretty darn good.
    Might have wanted to, but only started firing up the brewery this year. I have made them in the past.

    Actually, I'll probably make a butternut squash beer, as it looks like that's one of the few things in the garden that has been producing like crazy.

    I've made 'pumpkin' pies out of butternut squash and you can't tell the difference.
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
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