Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 26

Thread: Table Saw Blade Preference? - ***UPDATE***

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Thomasville, GA
    Posts
    6,000

    Table Saw Blade Preference? - ***UPDATE***

    I'll preface my question by saying that I've been using Freud TS blades for many years after reading reviews on them. My first experience with them was a combo blade that worked so well that I purchased a couple of other blades. OK, having said that, I know there are other options out there, so I wanted to ask for input from the group about pros and cons of other brands.

    So, let me have it!
    Last edited by Bill Arnold; 09-18-2013 at 05:18 PM.
    Bill Arnold
    Citizen of Texas residing in Georgia.
    NRA Life Member and Member of Mensa
    My Weather Underground station

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    No, not all of SoCal is Los Angeles!
    Posts
    9,077
    Carbide Processors have become my go to blade. American made, great service, outstanding quality and they're right up the coast from me ;-) The quality and amount of carbide on these blades means you will get many sharpenings making the total cost over the life of the blade quite reasonable. There are several great blade makers out there. One that is within reasonable shipping or travel distance for sharpening can be a decision point. I just got lucky that Tom at Carbide Proc. and Jerrimy at Snook's saw are the next couple of states up from me.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
    Posts
    5,323
    I've got Oldham, Freud, Infinity, and Tenyru combo blades, but keep putting the old Forrest back on the saw. It's still the best cutter. For ripping, I have two Freuds - a 24 tooth and a 30 tooth 'glueline'. I prefer the 30 tooth, but both do a great job in 8/4+ hardwoods.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Amherst, New Hampshire
    Posts
    10,604
    I had a new forrest WW2 blade and hated it. I gave it to Larry.
    I haven't found a blade yet I like better than freud but I'm always ready to give another a try.
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Wapakoneta, OH
    Posts
    611
    I have the Forrest WW2 and the Freud P410 (?) (version made prior to the current incarnation of the 410) and can't tell much difference between them. One covers for the other when it's out for sharpening. Those 2 are the 40 tooth combo blades; I also have a Forrest WW2 30 tooth. It's actually probably a more versatile blade, since it can easily rip stock over 2" thick (Forrest recommends you rip no more than 1" with the 40 tooth). True enough, it doesn't cut quite as smooth, but I always dress the edges anyway.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,020
    I don't remember the model numbers, but I'm running Freud Industrial thin kerf blades on my tablesaw. I've got a couple of the 24 tooth rip blades and one of the 60 (I think) tooth crosscut blades. I've always gotten glue-ready rips out of the 24 tooth blades.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    No, not all of SoCal is Los Angeles!
    Posts
    9,077
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Gibson View Post
    I had a new forrest WW2 blade and hated it. I gave it to Larry.
    I haven't found a blade yet I like better than freud but I'm always ready to give another a try.
    I also had bad luck with my WW2. It improved greatly after re-sharpening and so may have just gotten by quality control in a sub-optimal state(?). It is on a par with my Freud cutters with similar tooth geometry now which makes sense. What didn't make sense was that a blade so many people loved, was so poor . Obviously my initial blade was not correct from the get go; maybe your's too(?).
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  8. #8
    For me it was the gold Ridgid 10" x 96 tooth HiATB for sheet goods and the 10" 50 tooth combo blade for solid wood. Now that they discontinued them I use the Freud Diablo line of blades.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Constantine, MI
    Posts
    7,892
    My comments will be similar to others here. I used the WW2 for many years thinking it was top of the line and I could not get better. Even so, I was disappointed at times with slow burning rips in some denser woods and tear out on some crosscuts. I tried the Freud 30 tooth glue line and fell in love! It is now my go-to rip blade. I recently had to cut some sheet goods for a customer and did not want to change the WW2's performance so I went out and got the 80 tooth Freud plywood blade. It's VERY good and it is now my go-to crosscut blade. The WW2 my be relegated to rough cutting for stock prep.
    Host of the 2017 Family Woodworking Gathering - Sunken Wood

    “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk
    www.wrworkshop.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Thomasville, GA
    Posts
    6,000
    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    I don't remember the model numbers, but I'm running Freud Industrial thin kerf blades on my tablesaw. I've got a couple of the 24 tooth rip blades and one of the 60 (I think) tooth crosscut blades. I've always gotten glue-ready rips out of the 24 tooth blades.
    A quick hijack here related to thin kerf blades. When I got my new G0690, I left the factory blade (0.125" kerf) on it for initial testing, etc., including checking alignment of the riving knife. Then I put what has been my go-to blade for ten years, a Freud LU83R010. I started pushing a piece of 3/4" plywood through the blade and it stopped moving part way through the riving knife. I reached over, turned the motor off and had to lift the plywood straight up to get it off the riving knife. The knife looked perfectly aligned in the kerf, but I re-checked alignment of the riving knife anyway - no problem. Brain finally kicked in and I grabbed a caliper to check the blade and riving knife. If I had bothered to look at the blade, it shows its kerf width as 0.091". The thickness of the riving knife is 0.098" by my caliper; specs call it 0.100". Can you say, "Ah-ha moment?" Information about the saw says it handles thin kerf blades, but there are thin kerf and then there are thinner kerf blades. All of my other blades are 0.098" kerf or greater, as will be the new blades I'll order. I might be slow, but I'm not (too) stupid!

    We now return you to your regular programming...
    Bill Arnold
    Citizen of Texas residing in Georgia.
    NRA Life Member and Member of Mensa
    My Weather Underground station

Similar Threads

  1. Blade to table adjustments
    By Royall Clark in forum New Tools
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 09-27-2014, 07:18 PM
  2. Looking For table saw blade
    By Dave Black in forum New Tools
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 01-14-2010, 01:30 AM
  3. 10" table saw blade
    By Dan Thibert in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 06-24-2009, 05:43 AM
  4. sharpening wheel grit preference
    By Frank Fusco in forum Turning Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 09-12-2008, 03:26 PM
  5. Table Saw Blade sharpening
    By Darren Wright in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 04-12-2008, 02:05 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •