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Thread: Sharpening Jigs

  1. #1
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    Sharpening Jigs

    I am visiting my BIL, and trying to get him started with a Wolverine Jig for thumbnail grinds on a bowl gouge. It appears that he needs a $90 Wolverine grinding jig for non-thumbnail tools plus the $55 fingernail jig. Is this the right combo? Are there other pieces needed?

    I use a different system so have no experience with Wolverine.
    Charlie Plesums, Austin Texas
    (Retired early to become a custom furnituremaker)
    Lots of my free advice at www.solowoodworker.com

  2. #2
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    I wouldn't waste money on a skew jig if it is extra. The Vari-grind 2 jig is a little better than the original Vari-grind jig but it is about $20 more. The original will do the task, but takes more practice to get efficient at it.
    "We the People ......"

  3. #3
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    Paul, does the VariGrind 2 jig attach to the arm from the regular jig (as one might guess from Woodcraft's site) or does it have a separate optional or included arm (as one might guess from Rockler's web site).

    Looking at the pictures it was not clear how the VariGrind 2 attaches to the base.
    Charlie Plesums, Austin Texas
    (Retired early to become a custom furnituremaker)
    Lots of my free advice at www.solowoodworker.com

  4. #4
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    Charlie, the original Varigrind doesn't actually attach to the main jig "Vee-Arm", which is attached to the base, but the pointed end of it sits in the "pocket" at the end of the Vee-Arm as it's being used. The Varigrind 2 comes attached its own arm, which holds the jig more stably. So to answer your question, you'll need the main Wolverine jig, plus the Varigrind of your choice. Both the original and the Varigrind 2 produce the same results, but it's my understanding that the Varigrind 2 is a bit easier to use.

    Click on the pictures on this page to see better detail:

    http://www.oneway.ca/index.php?optio...id=39&Itemid=2

    And I'll echo Paul's suggestion about the skew jig...it's not all that useful.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  5. #5
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    Well, I thought the 2 came with a base and all. If you have to buy the base separately, that makes it almost double in price. I'd have to think long and hard about that. I do not own the 2 version, I have the original. A friend has the 2 and I looked at it a couple years ago. I liked it better, but not sure I liked it that much better.
    "We the People ......"

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Douglass View Post
    Well, I thought the 2 came with a base and all. If you have to buy the base separately, that makes it almost double in price. I'd have to think long and hard about that. I do not own the 2 version, I have the original. A friend has the 2 and I looked at it a couple years ago. I liked it better, but not sure I liked it that much better.
    The V2 comes with its own arm, but you can get it with or without the base. (The part than mounts under the grinder.) If you already have the regular Wolverine, you won't need the base. But if you don't have a Wolverine, and are interested in just doing fingernail grinds on your gouges, then you can get just the V2 and a base.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  7. #7
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    Duh, I guess I should have figured that out. When reading base, I was thinking the arm the jig is attached to. Don't know why that stuck in my head.
    "We the People ......"

  8. #8
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    Conclusions to the search

    My BIL placed the order, with the following assumptions. If we were wrong, we will post again.

    I thought there were two parts. Actually there are three

    1. The base that attaches under the grinder
    2. The arm that sticks out of the base.
    .....2a. The standard arm is where most tools rest for grinding
    .....2b. A special arm provided with the Varigrind jig version 2
    3. Varigrind jig for making thumbnail grinds on bowl gouges
    .....3a. Original version 1, rests in the standard arm
    .....3b. New version 2, rests in a custom arm that fits in the standard base, provided with the jig - item 2b

    These may be purchased in three configurations

    A. Basic Wolverine grinding jig - parts 1 and 2a above. About $90. Works for many tools
    ...A1. Varigrind jig version 1 for about $55, requires the $90 jig above (total about $145)
    ...A2. Varigrind jig version 2 for about $75, requires the base, bringing the total to about $165
    B. Wolverine jig only for bowl gouges: Base part 1, Special arm part 2b, Varigrind 2 jig part 3b, total cost about $110, but you cannot use it for other types of tools.

    I finally figured out that the picture on the Woodcraft web site was wrong - they had edited out the bar that seems to be included with the Varigrind 2 jig on other web sites including OneWay's site


    After I wrote this up, I looked back and realized that Vaughan had said the same thing, but it didn't sink in at first. Maybe different words will help someone else who is as confused as I was.
    Charlie Plesums, Austin Texas
    (Retired early to become a custom furnituremaker)
    Lots of my free advice at www.solowoodworker.com

  9. #9
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    Excellent summary, Charlie. It took me three or four tries (and edits of my original post) to figure out what it was they were actually selling.

    I think your BIL will be real happy with the jig.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

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