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Thread: Working on live-edge walnut, have some questions

  1. #1
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    Post Working on live-edge walnut, have some questions

    Hi guys,

    I'm working on some walnut and have some questions. I'm new to wood working

    1) I plan to use tung oil. Does anyone have any tips? How long should I leave it on before wiping off? Can I varnished over the oiled wood once dry or is there another step before varnishing?
    2) I plan to use a black wood filler to fill some knots on the surface. I purchased Probond max by Elmer's. Ebony color. Is this product any good and is it ok to use with tung oil?
    3) Can anyone recommend any varnish spray guns that don't require a compressor? Or do they all require one?
    4) I'm looking for the below protection finish. I am aware that is sugar maple and not wallnut. I'm looking for that shiny buffed finish. My question is what kind of varnish do I use and is that effect from buffing the sealed wood with a buffer?


    I know that's a lot of questions, I just don;t want to mess up

    Thanks in advance!
    Mike.

  2. #2
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    1. Are you talking about real, pure tung oil, or something like Minwax (or Formby's) "Tung Oil Finish"? If you're using real tung oil, it can take a long time (weeks) to fully cure enough to coat with another finish. If you're using the Minwax or Formby's product, there's really no need to apply varnish over it, since "Tung Oil Finish" is simply a wiping varnish that may or may not have a trace amount of tung oil in it. Keep in mind that neither real tung oil nor one of the "Tung Oil Finish" products lend themselves to spraying. They are both typically wiped on, then the excess is wiped off a few minutes later. I use Formby's Tung Oil Finish on a lot of my turned pieces. I typically only wait two or three minutes before wiping the excess away. (You want to wipe it up before it starts getting tacky.)

    2. No experience with Probond, so I'll let someone else chime in on that one.

    3. I've not heard of anyone using an airless sprayer for varnish. It might be possible, but I suspect the results are not great and that's why you don't hear about others doing it.

    4. I'd be willing to bet the finish on that sink is a 2-part epoxy, not a varnish. It's often sold as "Bar Top Finish". That's about the only finish that would hold up under that kind of use. I've not used epoxy finish, but some folks buff it and others don't. (I'm assuming you're talking about using a mechanical buffer and a range of buffing compounds...not just rubbing it vigorously with a soft cloth.)
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
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  3. #3
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    i also think that your example is a two part epoxy,, like vaughn said. i have sprayed heavy stain and paint with a airless sprayer but it have never seen varnish sprayed threw one.. be sure to show us your pictures of your progress on this
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  4. #4
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    i think i can use my pressure washer as a compressor. As long as the pressure hose has the same connections.

  5. #5
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    I have been reading about this and there is a lot of ways to do this.... i hope i don;t mess it up

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Frencel View Post
    i think i can use my pressure washer as a compressor. As long as the pressure hose has the same connections.
    I would vote against doing that. You'll burn up the pump in pressure washer in no time if it doesn't have water running through it. Also pretty sure the flow is going to be a bit on the low side.

    I agree that the example looks like epoxy which is reasonably easy to apply, you just pour it on and use a light hand with a torch to pop bubbles. Of course if you mess it up fixing it is a bit more challenging.

    The other finishes I could see using in that environment would be something like a table top finish waterlox and behlens rock hard come to mind. You can brush/wipe on either of those.

  7. #7
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    Well, I can't answer any of the question due to lack of knowledge, but that is a beautiful piece. I do have a question though, how do you keep it clean and prevent mildew from forming in all those crevices?
    "We the People ......"

  8. #8
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    Mike, since this is all pretty new to you, I'd strongly suggest doing several test runs with your finish on scrap wood. Sounds like the walnut you're working with is a pretty unique piece, and it'd be a shame to mess it up with the finish. (And trust me, every experienced guy here has messed up plenty of good wood...I know I sure have.)

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Douglass View Post
    ... I do have a question though, how do you keep it clean and prevent mildew from forming in all those crevices?
    Short answer: you don't. Sinks like that are for places like a guest bathroom that gets used once or twice a year. I used to occasionally see similar "look but don't use" stuff in fancy houses in the LA area back when I was installing artwork for the rich and famous.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  9. #9
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    i have used the rock hard finish and that would be my vote for you to use and its repairable if something goes wrong.
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  10. #10
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    So i put my first coat of tung oil. I noticed that i have some marks on it . See pic below. can i use a 400 grit sand paper after 24 hours after the first coat to try to get it out? Has anyone fixed anything like the bellow.



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