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Thread: Duct question for DC

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    WNY, Buffalo Area
    Posts
    873

    Duct question for DC

    As I continue my research on dust collectors and systems, it looks like I will be going with a standard 1 1/2 hp or 2 hp at the most system (no hookup for a 220 either) . Sorry Stu, the cyclone just isn't in the budget.... maybe some day

    What type of ducts does everyone use? PVC or metal?

    I know about having to ground the ducts especially if using PVC. Has anyone ever run it to a problem caused by the static build up?

    I have never run duct work before, how hard is it to run metal ducting?

    Which cost more?


    Thanks for you input!
    We create with our hands in wood what our mind sees in thought.
    Disclosure: Formerly was a part-time sales person & instructor at WoodCraft in Buffalo, NY.
    www.tinyurl.com/thewoodshoppe

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    Tampa
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    All my ducting is metal. The most difficult part of running meteal duct that I have run into is suspending it from ceiling. The second hardest thing was making strong, tight joints. I've used two methods so far: Metal/aluminum tape, Pipe clamps with an aluminum sleave.

    I dont like either method as the tape is hard to remove if you have to re-locate the duct and the clamp/sleeve doesnt hold the duct strongly enough.

    I prefer the sleeve method only because it is easier to relocate the duct if needed.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Houston, TX
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    There is some discussion regarding static electricity in PVC ducting, so you may want to read up on it before making a decision. I'm using PVC w/o grounding and really don't worry about it. Two reasons, a) I really don't think I have enough "fine" dust to worry about, and b) in Houston it is rarely dry enough to be able to generate static electricity.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    WNY, Buffalo Area
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    I was initially considering PVC, as it seems easier to work with than metal. Being that my shop is in my basement, static discharge & burning down my house is a concern.

    For about half the year my house has the right conditions for static electricity. My son and my wife can attest to this after being zapped periodicaly by me


    Edited: As I can't run ducting under my shop (concrete basement floor), I was going to run it overhead and across at least one of the walls.
    Last edited by Sean Wright; 04-05-2007 at 07:17 PM.
    We create with our hands in wood what our mind sees in thought.
    Disclosure: Formerly was a part-time sales person & instructor at WoodCraft in Buffalo, NY.
    www.tinyurl.com/thewoodshoppe

  5. #5
    Steve Clardy Guest
    Most of mine is PVC, under concrete.

    I have just a dab of metal ducting, not much.

    PVC is much easier to install.

    None of mine above concrete is grounded

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Placitas, NM in the foothills of the Sandia Mt
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    Hey Sean,
    All my ductwork is metal, suspended from the ceiling. Hardest part is the planning. Don't remember what machines you have, but its a good idea to think about making the dust ports bigger. Those 2 inch ports just don't do much. Looking back, I wish I had taken a jig saw or hack saw and opened a couple of them up to 4 inches. Try to keep the amount of plastic flex hose down to a minimum - lots of friction and reduced air flow. Try to 'cluster' your machine so one drop can serve a few machines.

    If you only use one machine at a time, a portable might work for you. They make quick connect fittings for moving hoses easily.

    Don't count on being able to find all the connectors and such you need at the Borg. Woodworker's supply www.woodworker.com has a pretty good supply and reasonable prices.
    Don't believe everything you think!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    WNY, Buffalo Area
    Posts
    873
    Quote Originally Posted by Jesse Cloud View Post
    Hey Sean,
    All my ductwork is metal, suspended from the ceiling. Hardest part is the planning. Don't remember what machines you have, but its a good idea to think about making the dust ports bigger. Those 2 inch ports just don't do much. Looking back, I wish I had taken a jig saw or hack saw and opened a couple of them up to 4 inches. Try to keep the amount of plastic flex hose down to a minimum - lots of friction and reduced air flow. Try to 'cluster' your machine so one drop can serve a few machines.

    If you only use one machine at a time, a portable might work for you. They make quick connect fittings for moving hoses easily.

    Don't count on being able to find all the connectors and such you need at the Borg. Woodworker's supply www.woodworker.com has a pretty good supply and reasonable prices.

    Tools needing connection to a DC are:

    Table Saw (base is mobile, as it is a small basement shop)
    Router Table in TS extension
    6in Joiner
    13in Planer
    4in Belt/6in Disc Sander
    Compound Miter Saw
    Small Bandsaw

    I was also planning on building a down draft table once I get a DC.

    I would also like to put in a floor sweep, if possible.
    We create with our hands in wood what our mind sees in thought.
    Disclosure: Formerly was a part-time sales person & instructor at WoodCraft in Buffalo, NY.
    www.tinyurl.com/thewoodshoppe

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ozarks
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    4,992
    sean, there`s no cheap way to install d/c piping....hvac duct might work for a while if less than 6" but it`s not a good long term solution....i don`t care for pvc just `cause......no good reason.....just used to metal...for starters, on a budget get a pump and a short (10`) piece of good flex and one good blast gate.......play with it for a while moving it from machine to machine before you consider hard-piping your shop.....after you`re used to what you have and know its capabilities and shortcomings then start thinking about the logistics and associated costs involved with hard-piping......tod
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Floydada, Tx
    Posts
    1,941
    I am using 6" stove pipe with fittings from penn state. The dc that is in my shop is the hf 2hp model and it does a good job. If I had the money I would consider the spiral pipe, but around here it cost over $3.00 a foot. Heavy gauge stove pipe(26 gauge) is is around $1.30 a foot. PVC(6") is around $2.00 a foot, but the fittings are hard to come by and costly.

    PVC does cuase some shock, but it is not enough to couse problems in the houe. You do not have to worry about it burning down your house.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    s. Barrington,IL.
    Posts
    127
    I orignally had all flex plastic pipe and connections from rockler. Problem was to many dips in runs so I replaced with 4" metal pipe from menards and used all the connectors from before now the only plastic is the drop to the machines.
    Ken

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