Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: OK Wood Turners---I Have a Clean Slate

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Oceanside, So. Calif. 5 mi. to the ocean
    Posts
    4,944

    OK Wood Turners---I Have a Clean Slate

    I have a clean slate full sheet of chip board) 9 inches behind the lathe bench and 20 inches behind the lathe bed (so I can get to both sides of the lathe if I really want to and so a long turning tool handle does not bump into the panel).
    Do you have any suggestions about how to utilize the space on the panel? I am wide open for suggestions.

    Here is a pic of the way it was in the past when the panel was actually attached to the back of the lathe bench. I added stuff to the panel as I learned what I reached for a lot. Therefore the location of stuff was not very logical. I used the, “Where do I have room for this now?” approach.
    The DC is removed at this time. I give up on the heavy chips. I just want to collect the fine dust before it gets out into the shop. Therefore you will not see DC in the new "clean slate" version.

    Since the slate is “clean” I would like to make a more intelligent use of the area. This includes the drawers below the lathe, the “shelf” above the panel and lighting.

    For general illumination in the area there is a dual 8 foot fluorescent luminaire above my head. I have tried several things for task lighting. Each of those things worked but only sort of.

    As I said above, " I am wide open for suggestions.

    The dark part of the pic on the right is bins which hold sanding materials. It is VERY handy, though larger bins would be better. I'll toss in another pic showing where the turning tools are kept. There are 10 turning tools in the holder at the end of the bench. You can also see the sanding bins easier in this pic. Shorter tools are in the tubes under the lathe bed.

    Enjoy and HELP,
    JimB
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 012.jpg   Lathe Light 2.jpg   Some Ole Guy Messin Round My New Lathe Cabinet.jpg  
    Last edited by Jim C Bradley; 09-27-2013 at 09:59 PM.
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,017
    What you store and where you store it is really a subjective personal choice, so I'm not really much help there. I will, however, put in a plug for a true Moffatt lamp for task lighting. I have become very reliant on the one I have on my lathe. The overhead fluorescent is no comparison to a well-aimed 100 watt GE Reveal incandescent bulb in a Moffatt fixture.

    I also concur with you on the futility of trying to catch all the chips that fly from the lathe. Capture the airborne dust and just let the chips fall where they may. That's what brooms are for.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Oceanside, So. Calif. 5 mi. to the ocean
    Posts
    4,944
    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    What you store and where you store it is really a subjective personal choice, so I'm not really much help there. I will, however, put in a plug for a true Moffatt lamp for task lighting. I have become very reliant on the one I have on my lathe. The overhead fluorescent is no comparison to a well-aimed 100 watt GE Reveal incandescent bulb in a Moffatt fixture.

    I also concur with you on the futility of trying to catch all the chips that fly from the lathe. Capture the airborne dust and just let the chips fall where they may. That's what brooms are for.
    Yes! A wise man (with the kamakazi squirrel) told me that a few months ago. That is why I am thinking this way.

    I have a fairly heavy duty flex arm and lamp, very much like Moffatt shows. However I want to mount the arm to the vertical "wall" behind the lathe. The lamp works fine if the "base" is down on the bench. However, when the "base" is mounted to the vertical panel behind the lathe the arm just cannot support itself and the lamp. All of the Moffatt items that I saw show their lamps with the base down, like on a bench top.

    If the 24" Moffatt will hold itself out horizontally, I will purchase one. Do you, or anyone else reading this, know if it will?

    Attached is a pic with mine showing.

    Enjoy,
    JimB
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Lathe Light 2.jpg  
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Reno, Nv
    Posts
    3,632
    I literally turn up against a wall so most of my chips end up under the lathe by one means or another. Easy to clean that way. Storage is on the opposite side of the shop so I don't dirty to many things. I can't speak intelligently on intelligent use of anything since I no longer have anything to do with intelligence. But I do have some good beer recommendations!
    Your Respiratory Therapist wears Combat boots

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,017
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim C Bradley View Post
    ...If the 24" Moffatt will hold itself out horizontally, I will purchase one. Do you, or anyone else reading this, know if it will?...
    Short answer, yes. The beauty of the Moffatt lights (in addition to the superior bulb socket/heat sink) is the stiffness of the arm. Check out this one I have under my air cleaner, held by the magnetic base. Granted, it's the 18" model, but the 24" one is going to definitely be stiff enough to stay in place horizontally:



    The one I have on my lathe also stays where I put it, regardless of any shaking or vibration from out of balance blanks.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Reno, Nv
    Posts
    3,632
    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    Short answer, yes. The beauty of the Moffatt lights (in addition to the superior bulb socket/heat sink) is the stiffness of the arm. Check out this one I have under my air cleaner, held by the magnetic base. Granted, it's the 18" model, but the 24" one is going to definitely be stiff enough to stay in place horizontally:



    The one I have on my lathe also stays where I put it, regardless of any shaking or vibration from out of balance blanks.
    Hmmmm...vue zhah dea...in other words...I've never been there before!
    Your Respiratory Therapist wears Combat boots

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Harrisburg, NC
    Posts
    140
    The short, this may give you some ideas. I how have a goosneck mounted on the vertical between the doors and it holds its position.

    Cabinet gives 52X30 area of shelves 5.5 deep and 16 linear feet of pegboard 30" high.

    If you need/want updated pics let me know. All max two steps from lathe center.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Lathe Cab 002.jpg   Lathe Cab 001.jpg   Lathe Cab 003.jpg  
    All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent. Thomas Jefferson

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Oceanside, So. Calif. 5 mi. to the ocean
    Posts
    4,944
    OK you Three (Vaughn, Jim and Mike)

    Vaughn and Jim---You got me thinking outside of the box I was in. I am going to go ahead with the Moffatt lamp. However, I am going to get it with the magnet as you guys did. I anticipate sticking it on the ways as you mentioned. I will also put a steel plate on the backboard (a round electric box cover) and place the lamp there when it would be in my way or if the light would be better coming from a different direction.

    QUESTION: Why did you go with the 100 watt incandescent instead of a twirly fluorescent? It seems to me that the curly lamp would be a lot cooler.

    Mike---I did not even have the remotest thought about a thin cabinet on the backboard until I saw your post. It is a darn good idea, however I am not going to use it at this time. One of the members of the local wood turning club (teaches at Palomar College) came over and spent a couple hours with me. He bumped the backboard with the turning tool handle. I sawed a few inches off of the handle and we continued on.

    I moved my workbench and TS a couple inches north and moved my sheet goods storage around 6 inches south to give me a gap between lathe and the backboard. This gives enough space that my longest handled turning tool will not hit. It gives me 9" that I can stand in if I want to work from that side of the lathe. I may even move the lathe bench 1" further north to get a bit more room. Nine inches just does not allow enough room for a cabinet and me, even though I am a small male.

    If I find that I do not stand in that space I will do the cabinet bit. The cabinets would be set high enough that the turning tool handle could go under them.

    If there are anymore ideas out there, send them in!

    Enjoy,
    JimB
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
    Posts
    12,256

    Re: OK Wood Turners---I Have a Clean Slate

    Well this is a bit "off the wall" lol thinking.
    I dont know if you left or right handed but what about flipping the lathe 180 from its current orientation so your predominant position at the lathe is between the wall and the lathe. This way you turn around and access the wall rather than have to reach over the lathe or walk around.
    In my view given you dont have lathe up against the wall making it easier to reach and access something then anything you put up there is going to be pretty much out of the use way. I think you would get way more use of that wall and better layout use too of tools if a turn left ot right would have you facing it and being able to pick a tool.
    Then you can still come around and turn from the other side if needs be.
    Your draws would not be lost. They may require that you increase space between wall and lathe though. But if you happen to have a platform to turn on (given your height) then it could be permanently positioned between wall and lathe and be out of the way on the other side.


    Sent from my MB860 using Tapatalk 2
    cheers

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,017
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim C Bradley View Post
    ...QUESTION: Why did you go with the 100 watt incandescent instead of a twirly fluorescent? It seems to me that the curly lamp would be a lot cooler...
    I hate fluorescent lighting, and have a hard time seeing sanding scratches under fluorescent lights. And I choose the Reveal bulbs over other incandescents because I prefer the color spectrum they put out.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

Similar Threads

  1. 3D Printing for Wood Turners
    By Dave Richards in forum General Woodturning Q&A
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-01-2016, 07:51 PM
  2. About to get a major wood haul: Mid atlantic FWW turners alert
    By Ned Bulken in forum General Woodturning Q&A
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-18-2012, 12:21 AM
  3. This Could Work For Wood Turners Too!
    By Dan Mooney in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 11-29-2009, 09:02 PM
  4. Fake slate
    By Keith Williams in forum Carpentry and Construction
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 05-19-2007, 04:04 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •