Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: First step into working with newer electronics

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,427

    First step into working with newer electronics

    I have a project I've been messing around with for a while and finally found a device to do temperature measurements, but couldn't find one that was already assembled. Assembly wouldn't normally be a problem, but it uses several of micro sized surface mount components. So I finally took the leap and bought some new soldering tools/supplies.

    A hot air rework soldering station, tweezers (a must), and a jewelers loupe (another must).
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	2013-09-30 19.11.57.jpg 
Views:	34 
Size:	54.8 KB 
ID:	78729Click image for larger version. 

Name:	2013-09-30 19.12.05.jpg 
Views:	31 
Size:	61.4 KB 
ID:	78730

    This is the board, I soldered all of the surface mount components first. The loupe was a must as those numbers and symbols are mighty hard to see without it. Also comes in handy to inspect the solder joints. The solder used was actually a paste that comes in a syringe, basically a flux with very fine solder particles in it that melt and connects itself to only the metal contacts.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	2013-09-30 20.28.10.jpg 
Views:	29 
Size:	67.8 KB 
ID:	78731

    Next I added the through-hole components and used my 15w iron to solder those.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	2013-09-30 21.03.18.jpg 
Views:	29 
Size:	58.9 KB 
ID:	78732

    This is the completed shield attached to an arduino micro processor.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	2013-09-30 21.32.10.jpg 
Views:	28 
Size:	86.3 KB 
ID:	78733


    This is a video of how the solder paste works...
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MqivHi7Qjvk

    Here is a example of someone just using a toaster oven at about 400* to do all the surface mount soldering.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SN8fzpigTGM
    Last edited by Darren Wright; 10-01-2013 at 07:39 PM.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,002
    Cool stuff. I'd never heard of hot air soldering.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
    Posts
    12,243

    Re: First step into working with newer electronics

    Best of luck with the outcome. Will be following along. Exciting times.


    Sent from my MB860 using Tapatalk 2
    cheers

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,353
    Awesome project. Can't wait to see it come along!
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    somewhere east of Queen Creek, AZ - South East of Phoenix
    Posts
    8,529
    sure beats what I used to go through when I got out of the Navy.I worked as a service tech for an electronics manufacturer. Of course we were soldering transistors then we finally got around to integrated circuits before I moved on out of that department.....
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Oceanside, So. Calif. 5 mi. to the ocean
    Posts
    4,944
    You should see some of the micro electronics that I built (mainly high-fidelity sound systems). I mean a capacitor was only about 3/8" in diameter and a typical resistor about a quarter of an inch in diameter and 1 1/8 inches long. The sockets for the electronic tubes were usually 1 1/8 inch in diameter though some were larger. A top quality 50 watt output (sound to speakers) transformer could easily hit 5 pounds.

    So, if you ever need to know anything about micro electronics, just PM me.

    Enjoy,
    JimB

    Did I mention "The Good Ole Days?"
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,427
    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    Cool stuff. I'd never heard of hot air soldering.
    The "iron" can be set to different temps on the front of the control unit, there is a fan and heating element in the iron part. Will get to 350* in about 2 seconds. The iron turns on and off with movement, set it down and it goes into a cool down mode, then powers off. Works really well for taking components off of boards too, can heat all the connections at the same time and lift them right off.

    It's a cheap Chinese brand, bought from here: http://www.sainsmart.com/other-1/hot...-plcc-bga.html

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim C Bradley View Post
    So, if you ever need to know anything about micro electronics, just PM me.
    "
    Will do. I have the feeling you know more about electronics that I'll ever know Jim.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,002
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim C Bradley View Post
    ...So, if you ever need to know anything about micro electronics, just PM me...


    Seriously, if I lived closer to you I'd have you help me figure out what's wrong with one of my tube guitar amps, a Fender Deluxe Reverb. It's been years since I plugged it in (plus now it's 800 miles away), but the last time I did, it burned up one or two new tubes in a matter of minutes. And since you get to tell your old-timer stories, here's mine: My parents bought that Fender amp for me when I was in about 6th grade. It was used...a few years old at the time. They paid $200 for it, which was a pretty big chunk of change for most folks in the mid to late '60s. That amp saw a lot of miles and a lot of shows. Fast forward to this evening, I saw a used Fender Deluxe at Guitar Center from the same vintage, and it was priced at $1299.99. Just goes to show that buying good tools pays off in the end.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
    Posts
    12,243

    Re: First step into working with newer electronics

    Oh i wish you had not posted that link Darren you are evil i feel the force pulling me into this vortex....i was eyeing a second hand oscilloscope the other day. But i have been strong and am resisting ...at this stage.

    Well Jim you make me feel real old. I studied electronics and in those days we started with valves and valve theory but went all the way thru to microprocessesors which were just getting going in my first year.

    Cool things the thermionic valve .....they a good starting point to understanding transistors and if ever there is an emp (electromagnetic pulse) set off well Vaughns amp might well be the only electronic thing working. Valves are not affected by emp so keep those old valve radios


    Sent from my MB860 using Tapatalk 2
    cheers

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Oceanside, So. Calif. 5 mi. to the ocean
    Posts
    4,944
    Darren,
    You left out a word. I will put an underscore in where it goes.

    "Will do. I have the feeling you know more about antique electronics that I'll ever know Jim."

    Well, I don't know much about it any more. Remember my previous signature, "Don't get old; your brains leak out."

    I suppose I should brag and say, "I have a magnificent brain leak."

    Vaughn,

    I still know an octal socket from a loctal and I know a #80 from a 2A3 from a #99 vacuum tube. Since that is about it ("
    Seriously, if I lived closer to you I'd have you help me figure out what's wrong with one of my tube guitar amps,") you really don't want me in the same city as your Fender Deluxe.

    By the way the #99 was often used by Ham Radio operators as their transmitting tube. It put out a magnificent 1 watt of power. My dad could (the atmospheric layers being nice) carry on conversations from San Bernardino, CA to New York or Florida. Of course he had to be using the correct antenna and it had to be tuned just right.

    Enjoy,
    JimB

    At that time I was about 3 or 4 years old (I am now 2 months from age 88) and the airways were practically empty. It was kind of like the skies---there were so few airplanes in the sky that you didn't have to file a flight plan (There was no place to file it anyway.). You just got in the airplane, made sure all the parts worked and that you had gas and oil, took off and went wherever the plane was capable of taking you (you couldn't get over most mountains).

    Shut up Bradley
    Last edited by Jim C Bradley; 10-02-2013 at 08:51 PM. Reason: Add to the B
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

Similar Threads

  1. Branding Iron Step-by-step
    By Jason Beam in forum Computer-Aided Equipment Project Showcase
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 05-02-2016, 08:58 AM
  2. Newer Porter-Cable VS Grinder Died - Need Some Motor Help
    By Jim C Bradley in forum New Tools
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 01-06-2015, 12:00 AM
  3. Rockwell 46-111 (newer design)
    By Royall Clark in forum Old Iron
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-05-2009, 02:08 AM
  4. Slowly I turned, Step by Step... (Three Stooges)
    By Don Taylor in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-08-2007, 06:59 AM
  5. Quince Yo-yo......Step by Step
    By Stuart Ablett in forum Lathe Project Showcase
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 12-16-2006, 01:30 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •