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Thread: Drwall and Insulation ?'s

  1. #1

    Drwall and Insulation ?'s

    In sthe process of building a house and
    my question is with drywall and insulation.
    What are ther pros and cons on stapling the insulation to the sides of the wall studs and gluing drywall to studs using the least amount of screws as possible.

    If the paper on the insulation does not lap over the inside face of the studs, is the vapor bearior compromised?

    How long before the glue holding the drywall on the walls crystalises ?

    Thank for the feedback

    Garry
    Last edited by Garry Smith; 04-06-2007 at 03:26 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Staple the paper of the insulation to the side of the studs not the edges. Screw the sheetrock on with the screws spaced as recommended. I believe that this allows for the give & take & movement of the structure of the house. A house is never completely stationary.
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
    "If it ain't round you may be a knuckle dragger""Turners drag their nuckles too, they just do it at a higher RPM"Bart

  3. #3
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    Garry I always staple the paper to the sides of the studs, that way the construction adhesive (drywall glue) has a place to stick to. The guys I sub to do my drywalling nail along both edges (head joint) and screw the top and bottom (bed joint) on the studs and only put screws in the "field" if there is a problem that they forsee. the glue will hold the drywall tight after it cures, and that way they do not need to finish the nail/screw holes.

    As far as vapor barrier compromise...no one seems to feel it is enough to worry about.....inspectors, trades, etc.
    A very wise man once said.......
    "I'll take my chances with Misseurs Smith and Wesson. "

  4. #4
    Hi Gary.

    At the risk of starting an argument, I will toss in my opinion. Mind you that I am not in the construction business.

    The material that is used for insulation does little to insulate in and of itself, but it is selected to have a very low coefficient of thermal conduction. Fiberglass excels in that arena as does foam. All of these products have the main job of trapping air and not allowing it move. The trapped air is the main insulator. Compressing fiberglass bats into the wall stud spaces reduces the amount of stagnant air trapped by the fiberglass, and thus reduces the overall quality of the insulation.

    What I did in my garage addition was to staple the insulation to the 2" edge of the suds. This gives the insulation room to trap the air and gives more effective insulation of the wall. If you are not using 2x6 studs, you should be in order to get an R19, instead of a meager R11.

    Regarding the vapor barrier, I haven't seen this done recently so I can't speak with any authority. When I built a home back in the 1976 time frame, in Ohio, the vapor barrier was just stapled to the edge of the studs. Today would guess it is glued to the studs. Either way, it performs the same task, that of keeping the transfer of moisture to a minimum. When we built 5 years ago, I used SIPs(R30)for walls, and vapor barriers were not required. Our drywall was just nailed to the SIPs.

    So, what I would do is to secure the fiberglass bats to the inside 2" stud surface using staples being sure that the fiberglass is not compressed. I would go over the bats assuring that the staples are completely driven into the studs. Then I would follow up with the standard vapor barrier. I think just stapling the barrier to the studs over the insulation kraft paper would work. By the time you screw the drywall the vapor barrier will be firmly pressed against the studs and work just fine.

    As I said above, I am not in the construction business. While I am most likely not up to date on current construction techniques, I will standby my trapped air theory of insulation.

    So, Steve and Bart, where am I going wrong. I won't argue with you, but I reserve the right to ask question.

  5. #5
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    At the risk of disagreeing with the two pro's, I wouldn't glue the drywall, or staple to the sides of the studs. The batts are designed to be stapled to the faces (as far as I know anyhow), to reduce the possibility of compressing the insulating material, as Ken described, and also to improve the vapor retarding properties of the kraft paper facing. The only advantage to stapling to the sides is for gluing the drywall field, which is ok for contractors in a big itchin' hurry but not the best method for a DYI'er who may want better insulating ability for the life of the structure at the expense of a bit of speed when hanging the drywall. Personally, I wouldn't glue drywall under any circumstances, because it is a big pain to deal with glued boards in a remodeling situation.

  6. #6
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    Gluing drywall..

    Drywall should be glued (IMHO). As for insulation, stapling it to the side of studs is fine, but you are right try not to compress it. If you staple the paper to the outside edge, you cannot glue the drywall because only paper would be holding the drywall.

    Gluing helps prevent cracks and nail pops because everything has to move together. We always screw our drywall. One screw on each end and 4 in the field ( 2 screws abouts 2 inches from each other)* ** ** *.

    I think the BIGgest problem is breaking the paper. When you break the paper on the drywall the screw/nail serves no purpose. Consider being in a room with a ceiling that has been glued, and a ceiling that hasn't... Now, which one would you sleep under?

    And besides isn't that what drywall adhesive is for.. hahaha.. (jk) anyway, you also want to seal all penetrations (where wires are run, etc..) with a foam spray to make everything air tight. I guess the idea is get it so tight, that when you light a match your whole house is warm.. heh... Insulate in between windows and their jack studs also.
    George Blevins
    Astriapo@earthlink.net

  7. #7
    Golly, now tonight I will be afraid to go to bed. Every sheet of drywall in our 3200+ sq ft house is nailed, both wall and ceiling. I guess people in different parts of the country do it differently.

  8. #8
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    I guess construction methods must vary greatly in the different areas of the country, because in my part of the world, I have NEVER seen OR heard of anyone stapling the paper to the "sides" of the studs, always to the 1 1/2" edge, and they also NEVER glue the drywall to the studs in the walls or on the ceiling either. Drywall screws every 8" is the normal procedure, and unless the paper on the Batts is damaged, there is no other vapor barrier added.

  9. #9
    Steve Clardy Guest
    Well.

    I've seen the insulation done both ways. I have done it both ways
    Whats best?

    I've seen drywall screwed, glued, nailed, and tatto'd.

    Whats best?
    I've always just screwed it on. I hate the nailing, as my fingers get tired of being the soft pad between the hammer and sheetrock

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Clardy View Post
    Well.

    I've seen the insulation done both ways. I have done it both ways
    Whats best?

    I've seen drywall screwed, glued, nailed, and tatto'd.

    Whats best?
    I've always just screwed it on. I hate the nailing, as my fingers get tired of being the soft pad between the hammer and sheetrock
    Boy am I ever with you on using the Screws, Steve. I've nailed a LOT of drywall in my younger years helping my Dad with remodels and small new consrtruction in his side work, but since discovering drywall screws I have NOT driven a nail in drywall since. Drywall screws don't loosen in ceilings and allow the drywall to sag either, as nails sometimes will do, (as in some rooms in our current house that I'm having to take care of now, and what a PITA).

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