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  1. #1

    First post

    Been lurking for awhile joined today. Was reading reviews on a nova 1624-44. Looks like all good reviews so I called woodcraft and they have one in stock. Had them put my name on it and will pick it up tomorrow. As this is my first lathe, what do I need to bring home with me to get started turning. Have a 6 inche grinder but need a new wheel. What else? This is a great site. Sure I will learn a lot here. I lam planning on joining a club in Kansas City but I have a pretty bad hearing loss and thought I might try to find someone for some one on one help in this area. Thanks for any suggestions

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    1,447
    Welcome to the forum.

    I have a Nova DVR, so know they are a good vendor, but I am not familiar with that model.

    Basic question... will you focus on spindles (wood between the head and tailstock) or on bowls (faceplate work).

    If you are primarily interested in bowls, you can do 99% or more with a good bowl gouge (I started with 3/8" but wish I had gone for the half inch). But you probably want to invest in a chuck - an expert recommended the Oneway Talon (to go with the Teknatool lathe), which I bought and have always liked. My favorite tutorial is Bill Grumbine's "Turned bowls made easy" see http://wonderfulwood.com/videos/

    If you will primarily be turning spindles, (or pens) other tools are more appropriate - I have a variety but am less expert on what to recommend. The skew chisel is probably the most versatile, but the hardest by far to learn to use - start with other tools until you have more experience.
    Charlie Plesums, Austin Texas
    (Retired early to become a custom furnituremaker)
    Lots of my free advice at www.solowoodworker.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Thomasville, GA
    Posts
    5,987
    Welcome to the Family, David!

    Sorry I can't help you with the spinny stuff, though. I have a lathe, but 99.9% of my projects have been flat work.
    Bill Arnold
    Citizen of Texas residing in Georgia.
    NRA Life Member and Member of Mensa
    My Weather Underground station

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,002
    Welcome aboard, David. The 1624-44 is a good lathe. I've not used one, but I know a lot of guys who like theirs a lot.

    The "what else do I need" question is never fully answered...you'll find the lathe purchase is just the beginning of your fall into the vortex. (It's a fun fall, though.) Before you get too carried away buying accessories and gadgets, I'd recommend going to the club meeting and seeing if there are any guys with some spare time to give you a little mentoring. That can shorten your learning curve a lot, and save you quite a bit of money, too.

    One thing I WILL recommend is a good sharpening jig to go with your new grinder wheel. Sharp tools are a must, and without them, turning is not very much fun at all. A jig makes it easier and faster to get the tools sharp, and you'll grind away less of the tool each time by using the gig. The Wolverine by Oneway is the most popular sharpening jig, and for good reason...it works well. A lot of folks have also made their own version of the Wolverine style sharpening jig. They also work, but if you have the funds, I'd recommend just going with the original.

    You'll also need some gouges and scrapers and skews. A lot of us started out with the HSS set from Harbor Freight. They are not great tools, but for their price, they are a pretty good starter set. The next step up quality-wise would be something like the Benjamin's Best tools from Craft Supplies USA. (The Wood River tools from Woodcraft are comparable, but I think they're a bit more expensive.) They are somewhat better than the Harbor Freight tools. The next step up from there is getting into what I consider REAL turning tools, and at that point I'd recommend against buying set, and instead just buying the individual tools you need. (Experience will tell you which tools those will be for your needs.) There are several well-known and popular brands like Sorby and Crown, but for less money, you can have the best: Thompson Tools. (Personal opinion: Sorby and Crown tools are priced at about 2 to 3 times what they're really worth. They are good tools, but priced higher than great tools.)

    And don't forget the safety gear. A face shield is a must. Not just goggles...full face coverage, in my opinion. At some point in your turning adventures you WILL get hit in the face with stuff, Better to have the shield on before that happens. You should also have some lung protection for when you're sanding...a respirator, a dust collector with a good lathe scoop, or minimally a good fan blowing the dust out your open shop door.

    Welcome to the Abyss!
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Yorktown, Virginia
    Posts
    5,002
    Hi David and welcome to the family. Let me echo some of the good advise you have received and recommend a Wolverine sharpening system and Doug Thompson tools. You will need a face shield and dust mask for safety. You will need some kind of chuck with adjustable jaws....lots to choose from. I recommend a multi-tooth drive center for spindle turning which makes catches less severe. For lathe tools, I would start with a one inch spindle roughing gouge, a half inch spindle gouge and a half inch bowl gouge. Then I would go on line and look at home made lathe tools like the pyramid tool
    http://www.davidreedsmith.com/articl...dPointTool.htm
    and others. You can find lots.
    Sanding: I would also travel to Harbor Freight with a 25% off coupon and get one of their variable speed angle drills to use with sanding pads--which you can get everywhere, but try
    http://vinceswoodnwonders.com/
    for a starter set.
    After you get started (hooked) you will find no end of cool gadgets to spend your money on. Good luck with your new addiction

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Amherst, New Hampshire
    Posts
    10,600
    Welcome David !!!

    I can't help you much with spinny stuff questions but we have a few folks in the KC area that will surely help you out.
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,353
    Welcome aboard! Our spinny guys give great advice!
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Bellingham
    Posts
    2,449
    Welcome David. What about the Easy Wood turning tools, especially their new chuck? I ask because I do not consider myself a turner, besides I get all my turning advice from Larry Merlau.
    “When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece.” - John Ruskin
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.” - Oscar Wilde

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,002
    Bill, the Easy Wood tools are a great addition to the set, and made by a great company, but personally I would feel limited if didn't have gouges and scrapers to go with them. One disadvantage to the carbide tools is the continued cost of replacement cutters. I use the Easy Wood tools, but save their use for times when they are the best choice for a particular cut.

    That said, I know there are some turners - especially pen turners - who use Easy Wood tools exclusively and get good results.

    I've not used one, but from what I've seen their chuck is innovative and well built. You do pay a premium price for the convenience of easy jaw changes. Personally, I use a cordless drill with a hex bit to remove and replace the jaws on my chucks, so it's pretty quick and painless anyway.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Reno, Nv
    Posts
    3,632
    Welcome to the Family Bill! When I learn how to turn...I'll chime in with something!! Until then, looks like great advice!
    Your Respiratory Therapist wears Combat boots

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