Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Any Experience w/ Straight Edge Clamps?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Bellingham
    Posts
    2,449

    Any Experience w/ Straight Edge Clamps?

    Such as ProGrip Back to Back. Looking for knowledge such as: any deflection side to side in the middle and does the clamp secure to the work without moving? Anything else I should know?

    Basically I am looking for information as to how well these products work and which ones work best.
    Last edited by Bill Satko; 01-02-2014 at 02:55 AM.
    “When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece.” - John Ruskin
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.” - Oscar Wilde

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    1,898
    I got this one from Sears for Christmas it's 50 inches, as you can see it's still in the package so I haven't tried it yet, but I have to break down some plywood for a project so I hope it will work well.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC00227.jpg 
Views:	31 
Size:	37.2 KB 
ID:	80127
    Jesus was a Woodworker

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    No, not all of SoCal is Los Angeles!
    Posts
    9,076
    I have a 50" and steered dad onto a set of three at a blowout price from Rockler back awhile. Dad also has a back-to-back that he inherited from a neighbor. I also have a short one that I use as a quick fence on my 10" bandsaw. The older unit is much stouter (no surprise there) but, the current crop of eemersontool products are very usable. My short one is the "A-series" profile with the raised track while the set dad has and my 50" are all the AIO (all-in-one) "Contractor" profile with the recessed tracks. All are quite rigid but, they are an aluminum extrusion. The closed box design makes then much stiffer than other versions I have tried. I use them as a guide and not as a clamp but the grip pressure available is pretty surprising. In my use I have always had success with them and am glad to have them.
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 01-02-2014 at 01:55 PM.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    1,448
    I have a 24 and 50 inch TruGrip "Clamp 'n Tool Guide."

    I use them regularly as a router guide when cutting dadoes, since the router follows the irregularity of the plywood, and with a good dado I can clamp out the irregularity during assembly. They have worked well for over 10 years.

    I do not use them as clamps. The jaws are only about 1/2 inch high, so all the pressure is on the top of the work, not across the entire face of the pieces being clamped. In fact, taller jaws would be nice, because sometimes I would like to put the dado/rabbet (3/8" high and deep) in the back of a cabinet before I do the shelf dadoes, but that only leaves a small amount of area to clamp.

    My usual test... if I had to replace my shop, what would I buy? This pair of clamps (or at least the 24 inch one) would be replaced.
    Charlie Plesums, Austin Texas
    (Retired early to become a custom furnituremaker)
    Lots of my free advice at www.solowoodworker.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Bellingham
    Posts
    2,449
    Thanks everyone! I have all sorts of F-Clamps, Cabinet Clamps and even a Festool Track System, but wanted a quick way to secure work to my bench top and have a guide at the same time for doing things like routing dados. Not really thinking of using them for gluing up boards or cabinets. That is why the double clamp was looking appealing to me. If I do decide to get them, it will probably be 24" or 36" set.
    “When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece.” - John Ruskin
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.” - Oscar Wilde

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,014
    I have a pair of the back to back models, and have used them occasionally to hold panels or things like cutting boards on my Workmate. (Although in most cases, the Workmate on its own can do the same thing.)
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Spitting distance north of Detroit Michigan
    Posts
    3,798
    I've got a 36" back to back that I use for routing dado's and holding small works to the bench top when doing inlays like on box tops...wanting to get another that matches for larger jobs...never a complaint on holding strength here.
    The perception of perfection is perfectly clear to everyone else

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SW MN
    Posts
    34
    about holding work securely to the bench---I will add this method which I have used for many years. I purchased a vacuum pump and made my own vacuum clamps. I find that I use system regularly and I consider the system one of my most valuable tools. The cost is not prohibitive and well worth checking out. The comment about holding stock on the bench top prompted this post.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
    Posts
    17,471
    Quote Originally Posted by Marv Rall View Post
    about holding work securely to the bench---I will add this method which I have used for many years. I purchased a vacuum pump and made my own vacuum clamps. I find that I use system regularly and I consider the system one of my most valuable tools. The cost is not prohibitive and well worth checking out. The comment about holding stock on the bench top prompted this post.
    hey marv you have any pictures of how you made your vacumn clamps? would like to see how you do it. thanks
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Escondido, CA
    Posts
    5,172
    Back in the day, Larry, I taught a class on vacuum clamping. Had to create the syllabus from scratch. Was nothing out there 18 years ago. Dirt simple if you understand the concepts. Straight edge clamps clamp to a solid surface like your bench and your work piece is clamped by them. A vacuum clamp in this configuration is simply a 'plate' that have an area surrounded with closed cell tape. There is a hole within that area that is connected via an air hose to a vacuum pump. Fasten the plate to a solid surface (bench), lay your workpiece on top of the plate, making sure air cannot get into the vacuum area. Turn on the pump. Your work piece is securely held down and you can rout, sand, carve, etc. with no interference from surface clamps. You can easily make the plates from non-porous substrate to suit the occasion. I have a trunk full of them - somewhere.

    Weakest dimension is sideways. If you plan to exert sideways force, use a physical reference pin to block it. This is the secret to CNC clamping as well. If you use a porous material like MDF, you will need to seal it. Vacuum pressure works because one side of the workpiece has a different air pressure exerted on it that the other. So the atmosphere pushes down to hold things down. Actually it works in any dimension. Interesting, fun stuff, learning how to use a vacuum pump in the shop. If there is a family gathering in your neck of the woods next summer, maybe I could do some demos on the technology. Hoping Jonathan will be well enough to go forward on that. Love to see his horses at work and play. Can't go to New York. No place for a single white woman traveling alone. Certainly not one quite as sprightly as she once was. Sorry, Allen. BTDT. Not again.
    ++++++

    Some say the land of milk and honey; others say the land of fruits and nuts. All together my sort of heaven.

    Power is not taken. It is given. Who have you given yours to? Hmmmm?

    Carol Reed

Similar Threads

  1. Straight Edge
    By Mohammad Madha in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 12-16-2011, 03:35 AM
  2. Questions on straight edge
    By Rennie Heuer in forum New Tools
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 12-31-2007, 10:11 PM
  3. Straight edge on table saw
    By Niki Avrahami in forum Jigs and Fixtures
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 11-28-2007, 02:51 AM
  4. Veritas Straight Edge Surprise
    By glenn bradley in forum New Tools
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 10-10-2007, 11:51 AM
  5. looking for straight edge and wood threading tool
    By Darren Myers in forum Old Ads
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-12-2007, 11:48 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •