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Thread: Wood shop heater!!?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
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    Northwest Georgia U.S
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    Wood shop heater!!?

    I just bit the bullet a bought

    Portable Military Camping Hunting Ice Fishing Cook Wood Stove Tent Heater w/ Bag by TMS http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BTNAYIA/..._VoM6sb1NWGA98




    I had to do it after looking up and down locally per owned and new
    I came to find out that wood stoves have went UP in price unlike I originally thought. So I bought this it should be her by Wednesday next week. My question is I are they're Amy safety issues I should know about beside proper ventilation and biting off previous pain coat because of toxic odors. Any tips you guys could give me? I've never had a wood stove and this one I feel will do just right for my 25x30 garage
    Thanks guys!
    Ninja ~


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  2. #2
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    Just added that to my Wishlist!!
    Your Respiratory Therapist wears Combat boots

  3. #3
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    What's the building like that you're planning to install it in? Is is insulated, traditionally built or a pole/metal type building?
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  4. #4
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    be sure to abide by your insurance company's regs..or you could be in for some hassles later
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  5. #5
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    Jul 2011
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    So I don't believe that that stove is rated for indoor use so there may be some insurance issues if you ever have a fire (indeed some areas/setups there are insurance issues with any wood heater so there's that).

    Past that there are some installation differences in a more permanent install that you'll want to look into.

    • install it on a non-flammable surface because there are inevitably sparks and coals that get bumped out when you open it to add wood/shake the wood down/etc... Back in the old days we used a sheet of tin but really that's marginal and a sheet of hardboard or something under the tin would be better so as to isolate the tin from the floor. If your floor is concrete, well Just don't let wood dust/scraps accumulate to closely.
    • Make sure you have a safe stand off from walls, etc. Also a fire/heat barrier (with a dead space between it and the wall) is recommended
    • Frankly although I've used sketchier setups, I wouldn't put that stovepipe through a roof (or near a rood). You would be astounded at how hot stovepipe can get so where they go through walls/roofs you want to use pipe that is rated for that. Its generally multi-wall pipe and often has some insulation in between some of the walls or has other venting features (I haven't looked in a while so I'm not sure on current state of the art). Generally I would prefer to avoid single wall pipe in any permanent structure I cared about because its to easy for a spark to escape through it. A lot of people still use it though, make sure the surroundings are protected accordingly. Stove pipe can end up costing more than the stove
    • Speaking of stove pipe make sure you clean that sucker out at least yearly. Especially with a stove like this one you can get a lot of creosote build up inside the pipe and while stove pipe fires are exciting they are also maybe well to exciting. Using good, dry wood also helps slow down creosote buildup.
    • On a more prosaic level put a pot of water on the stove. Wood heat is a very nice dry heat but it can end up a bit to dry, so a pot of water helps balance that out. Its also convenient to make tea that way


    The alaska safety dept guidelines go into a bit more detail on some good basics: http://dps.alaska.gov/Fire/TEB/docs/woodstovesafety.pdf The NFPA guidelines are a bit more handwavy: http://www.anpac.com/safety/home/III/Wood_Stoves.pdf If there is a problem with a fire your jurisdiction may have different rules of course so ymmv

  6. #6
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    Dec 2013
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    Northwest Georgia U.S
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    Wood shop heater!!?

    Ok that was loads of info ! But very helpful! To clear up some questions. The wood stove is not that large it's meant to be portable so what I plan on doing is only using it for the harsh cold days/nights
    I plan to use it without notifying my insurance as I will never leave it burning while unattended. And it's only going to be importation all during the winter.
    As for how I'm going to put it in for a temp use is I plan on kinda placing it in the corner of my shop and by there I have a window I can take out and but in a cut sheet of hard ply and run it out threw there of course using dbl wall pipe anywhere it's touching and from there it will be 3'x3' from each wall. So there won't be much length of pipe needed.
    Do y'all think that will be ok?
    And I'm working in a 2 car garage but it's also the basement for the house because I live on such a steep hill the other side is just as big but I have a 100'x100' tarp divining the to halves.


    Ok well what do y'all think!? Remember I'm only going to be using this just for the cold season then it will be cleaned packed and stored away and I don't think I will be making any type of HUGE fire in it normally just a small thing of charcoal will warm it for about 2 hrs not toasty warm but at least tolerable and I live in ga. Thanks guys
    Ninja~


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  7. #7
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    as i see it ninja ,, i would put it near that far wall that is the clearest of flammable stuff move the propane tanks!!! and you need to vent it out side somehow for the smoke,, reason for having it over there is it away from the work area and in an emergency you kick it out side.. my preference for what your doing would have been one of those oil filled electric heaters .. they are safe and will take the chill of pretty good and they are reasonable.. and you dont have to feed it..
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ninh Shepherd View Post
    As for how I'm going to put it in for a temp use is I plan on kinda placing it in the corner of my shop and by there I have a window I can take out and but in a cut sheet of hard ply and run it out threw there of course using dbl wall pipe anywhere it's touching and from there it will be 3'x3' from each wall. So there won't be much length of pipe needed.
    Do y'all think that will be ok?
    Can't 100% say for sure obviously

    Personally I'd probably be mostly ok with it myself with a few caveats.

    I'd likely want to avoid the ply if possible for the window and maybe use 1/2" fiber board or something else non-flammable that doesn't transfer heat well.

    Check the outside for two things: places for a spark that went up the chimney to land on things (usually the chimney is supposed to end several feet above the roof for this reason - see the alaska dps guidelines I shared for some ideas there - and possibly add a spark arrester to the chimney as well) and also if there are any places where the wood smoke/or other gasses (carbon monoxide most concerning) could get pulled into the rest of your structure. I might buy a cheap monoxide detector because you're below grade and it has a nasty habit of settling in low places when you don't want it to.

    I'd probably put a fire barrier (drywall or something like that) over the joists above (and a few feet around) wherever you put it so that a stray spark doesn't get up in the rafters and smolder away unnoticed. The amount of sparks that can come out when you open the door to stick in another piece and one of the burning pieces "pops" can be surprising.

    One other thing I've found is that its surprisingly easy to get a whole lot more fire going than you intended in a whole lot less time than you'd think possible so watch that and be careful to not over feed it until you get a handle on how it burns (and if you switch wood types or get a fresh batch that's drier than usual realize that some burn a whole lot faster or longer than others). Your plan of burning charcoal helps this (and the previous point) quite a bit in practice (although charcoal can get a pretty hot fire going as well).

    And as Larry noted I wouldn't stick it next to the propane tanks

    Having said all that there are few sources as nice as wood heat imho, it just does a fantastic job of knocking the chill off. But you live in Georgia - there are "harsh cold days/nights" there?

  9. #9
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    Ninh, I'm with Larry on the oil filled electric heater. I wouldn't trust myself not to knock that thing over or have a board fall on it. I'd be worried about make-up air too, although the garage is probably leaky enough. Be careful whatever you do.

  10. #10
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    I'd agree with Larry as well, either go with an oil heater or if not around flammables an infrared one would be a good second as you can point it toward where you are working. It looks like a basement shop, why not add a vent or two on the duct work to push a little heat in there? It should rise and help keep the house warmer too. I have one vent from the house in our garage, which isn't insulated, even on a 10 degree day it's usually 40 out there.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

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