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Thread: a bit of help please

  1. #1
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    a bit of help please

    It was asked if I could duplicate this wine rack for someone.Click image for larger version. 

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    They didn't bother looking at the price of it since it was in a very expensive wine/cigar store in the middle of a very expensive casino, but figured if its made of wood, I can make it.
    My questions:
    I have some soft maple on hand, and its going to be painted, not stained.
    Should I use soft maple to make it, or should I use pine since it will be painted.

    next question, since Ive never painted anything Ive built, do I prime maple or pine the same way?
    I intend to paint most of the black by hand, with a glossy finish paint, and then probably paint the white parts the same way.
    All by hand since Im not set up for spraying paints, and I don't want to rip my hair out trying since this is a relatively small project to paint.
    does anyone have a suggestion on which type of paint to use on pine or maple(must be glossy finish)?
    Human Test Dummy

  2. #2
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    I'd go with the maple. Closer, tighter grain will give you a smoother painted surface and it will not be as susceptible to dents an dings - not impervious, just less susceptible. The alternating hard and soft (early/late) grain in most pines makes it nearly impossible to get a flat surface that will not telegraph through the paint. Especially gloss!

    Yes, prime. I like to sand to 220, prime, then hand sand the primer with 220 or even 320 to smooth it out and get it ready for the finish coat.
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  3. #3
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    the only thing can add to rennies advice is to make it as easy as possible to get it painted inside allen pre paint if you can then attach sides gettin into the small crevices with a brush is a pain, a decent airles sprayer on this would be a great friend..
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  4. #4
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    Definitely not pine for the reasons mentioned above. Also, depending on your market, you may find clear pine to be more expensive than maple. Is here. Might also consider poplar. Great wood for painting!
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  5. #5
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    thanx for waking up my brain carol.
    I have a little bit of poplar around, and I can get it 3 minutes away at the home depot. Its such a small project costs will be very small, no need to run over the bridge for a few board feet of poplar.

    Im going to run over to home depot tomorrow, maybe get a few bf of poplar, but need to get some mdf to make a template or two, wanna see how thin a sheet I can get for the back(hoping for 1/16th luan), and probably one of those 2x2 pieces of 1/2 inch birch for the shelves.
    Last edited by allen levine; 03-05-2014 at 08:04 PM.
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  6. #6
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    +1 on the poplar. Are you going to try and add the graphics too?

  7. #7
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    Proper wine cellars are NOT painted, stained, oiled, or anything. They should be bare wood, so there is no possible transfer of the paint solvents to the wine. I used to subcontract work for Grandeur Cellars who built wine cellars, and NONE were painted (until they grew their own skills in-house). The most common wood I remember was sipo, but I am sure there were others.

    See my columns and doors at www.plesums.com/wood/other/winecellar.html
    or the Grandeur Cellars site at http://www.grandeurcellars.com/

    If you are going to condition the storage (you should - 48-52 degrees is common) use a double glass door and an air seal around the edge, so moisture doesn't condense on the door.
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  8. #8
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    While many wine cellars are made with exotic, bare wood, don't assume that's the way you have to go. A quick search online will show you otherwise.

    Think about it: If the wine is in a glass bottle, properly sealed and kept at the proper temperature, how is the finish going to affect the product?
    Bill Arnold
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  9. #9
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    Charlie-this is a den/bar wine rack. I don't think anyone is worried about humidity or temps, its just going to hold a few bottles of wine, I doubt anything worth real money.
    Ted-what graphics? the picture is the rack inside the stores window.
    Human Test Dummy

  10. #10
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    Another vote for poplar. Semi-hard, sands smooth, holds & shows paint well, inexpensive.

    Might consider:

    • Primer - insures paint will stick well & the white primer shows the paint color better.
    • Gloss enamel paint.
    • If concerned about end grain, I know you previously recommended glue size. However, I've recently tried Bondo & sand to 400 grit for a super fine surface. Short work time & sands easily. Works very well!
    • If using an aerosol paint spray in a cool area, try heating the can of paint in a pot of warm tap water ~ 15-30 minutes before painting. Seems to make it spray better resulting in a better finish.
    Last edited by Al Launier; 03-06-2014 at 05:24 PM.
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