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Thread: Why

  1. #1
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    Why

    of late I have seen a bunch of talk about polly over paint. I can find tons of stuff on how but I can't seem to find anything on why you would want too. So I ask why would you want to do such a thing?
    It could be worse You could be on fire.
    Stupid hurts.

  2. #2
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    a quick search said it was to help prevent peeling of the paint and also it give it a real smooth finish that is more durable. but it can react with the paint so make sure you try it out on a test piece first.
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  3. #3
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    Yeah, I don't understand it, I mean if you want a gloss finish, use an oil base enamel. Poly tends to yellow whatever it's applied to, though I don't know if the same can be said about the water based stuff. Over a faux finish maybe, for protection as Larry mentioned, but for just plain protection, I'd lean to more coats of a quality paint myself.
    The perception of perfection is perfectly clear to everyone else

  4. #4
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    I made a Shaker firewood box based on Norm Abrams plans one time.

    I used Milk Paint to paint it.

    I then topped it with poly.

    Why - I thought I was going to get a "tougher" finish - considering I was actually using it for firewood.

    Well - it really is a tough finish. I cannot believe how tough the finish has held up. It has been about 8 years and here is no place where wood shows through.

    I think though - the poly did nothing really. I am pretty sure the milk paint all by itself is really tough.

    One thing I can say is that I was able to sand the milk paint really smooth - removed the brush marks - the poly made it "look" really nicer that just the paint.

    That was the last time I did that.

    Since then I will paint - and paint only.

  5. #5
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    That was kinda what I was thinking that someone came up with an idea that it would be better than just paint. Like they are going for the paint job that cars get base coat clear coat not knowing that the polly isn't really doing anything for them. But someone said it was so they must be right
    It could be worse You could be on fire.
    Stupid hurts.

  6. #6
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    What I think it does is to allow some sanding to remove brush marks before the final - finish top coat.

    Water based paint is really thick and dries really fast - leaving some brush marks.

    Last thing I painted - (not counting signs) - I painted with Sherwin Williams, best quality, oil based paint. It was great.

    When I was about 15 my dad showed me how to make paint from scratch. It did have a white lead base to it. It also had linseed oil and other stuff. To this day I have never had as nice a paint as that paint. The Sherwin Williams oil based paint was "near" as good as that paint from many years ago. Next time I need something "really good" and I want a fine smooth finish - it will be oil based Sherwin Williams. NO need to top coat with Poly.

  7. #7
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    Yep, wear resistance. Poly definitely has its uses. An early set of nightstands show virtually no signs of wear after years. They look like they're coated in plastic (to me) but, the surface protection cannot be questioned. A similar film over paint would certainly assure a long life.
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 03-10-2014 at 02:46 AM.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
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  8. #8
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    why go to the poly over paint when you can buy colored poly to whatever color match you want. Then you don't have to worry about adhesion issues?
    I use a waterborne on many of my cabinets that is very durable and gives a great finish
    He who laughs last, thinks slowest

  9. #9
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    From what I read on some other forum, lot's of places it is very difficult to get oil base enamel anymore. I have not experienced in my neck of the woods, but keep reading about. Do they put poly over the water base paint? My experience is glossy water base scratches pretty easy. Maybe that is what they are trying to avoid.
    "We the People ......"

  10. #10
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    Their are some good non yellowing acrylic poly's out there , but I wouldn't.
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