Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 28

Thread: Flexible and Strong Wood Glue

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807

    Flexible and Strong Wood Glue

    I'm in the process of bidding another chair-like prop for my favorite Canadian Circus (please don't say their name, just trying to keep a low profile).


    This will be a chair or two (I'm trying to get them to buy two for a good price, as we all know with chairs making two is NOT double the price as you already have all the jigs and such built) that is used in a highwire act......





    Twice daily the chair gets dropped from a height onto the wirenet then when the act is over the wirenet gets released the the chair hits the stage from about 6 feet up, it comes down a different way each time and over time the chair gets busted up.


    The chair is reinforced in key areas with steel, which I'll have to make as well, and the weight is to be between 6-7Kg 13-15lbs about. I've already identified some things that can be improved upon the existing design, that will make it a lot stronger and will not add any weight.


    OK what I'm putting out there for everyone is what kind of glue should I use?


    A typical PVA white glue would work, I'm sure, but what about something that is good and solid but has some flex to it?


    A gorilla glue or an epoxy?


    I'm open to all ideas here, this is a high end build that has to be better than good, and it has to be durable too.


    The wood used will be Beech, I think it is a good choice for strength and durability, it is often used in chair construction and is not bad to work with. It is expensive here in Tokyo, but hey, so is everything else. I'm planning on using typical mortise and tenon joints and I think I'll pin these joints to make them extra strong. I have a time frame that the chairs would have to ship before the middle of June, so I do have some time, but as you know I'm really busy with other stuff too, so I need to get in front of this, so I'm looking for ideas.


    I cannot share the plans with you for obvious reasons, but it is a basic chair, the base is a bit wider side to side and back to front than the seat, but not much, the legs have about a 3 degree splay. The chair back is straight up and down, not like a real chair, it is a prop.


    Your thoughts on all of this would be appreciated, I have a pretty good idea about how I'm going to prototype it and then build it, but I would be a fool if I did not ask for more input.


    Thanks!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Amherst, New Hampshire
    Posts
    10,600
    Can't help with the glue very much but I would think that epoxy would be strong but brittle.

    I just built my grand daughters vanity from beech. $1.80/bf. I'd never used it before and I found it easy to work but not as strong as oak or ash. Also, while jointing I noticed occasional sticky spots on the wood. I don't know if they were pitch pockets or something else ??? The sap wood is super soft.
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Bedford, NH
    Posts
    1,683
    If using epoxy, the 5 minute version is more brittle than the 18 hr or 24 hr cure type. Golf club makers generally the latter as it is strong, yet resilient enough to withstand impact, plus it allows for more working time. Although this one (http://www.golfsmith.com/product/300...pint-black-fe#) cures black, as is most common for golf clubs, you can get this type of epoxy in the clear version if you prefer.
    Thoughts entering one's mind need not exit one's mouth!
    As I age my memory fades .... and that's a load off my mind!

    "We Live In The Land Of The Free, Only Because Of The Brave"
    “The problems we face today are there because the people who work for a living are outnumbered by those who vote for a living."
    "
    Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery." Winston Churchill

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
    Posts
    12,245
    Well I would think using the same kind of glue that is used to do strip canoes would be a good starting point and if i recall that is system west epoxy. Reason i am thinking this way is the flex a canoe has to withstand and not crack. May be worth thinking about ripping off some of the canoe logic given when the strips are covered the way its done it ends up looking like wood but has a coat of glass beneath that smooth layer and its clear as daylight. Other thing i can think of that would add strength is laminating as in making up laminated beams or boards. But hey there has to be a limit to the cost so making ones own lumber can only go so far. Just on the risk management side i take it you have considered the insurance aspect of being covered from any potential liability in this case.
    cheers

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Keeble View Post
    Well I would think using the same kind of glue that is used to do strip canoes would be a good starting point and if i recall that is system west epoxy. Reason i am thinking this way is the flex a canoe has to withstand and not crack. May be worth thinking about ripping off some of the canoe logic given when the strips are covered the way its done it ends up looking like wood but has a coat of glass beneath that smooth layer and its clear as daylight. Other thing i can think of that would add strength is laminating as in making up laminated beams or boards. But hey there has to be a limit to the cost so making ones own lumber can only go so far. Just on the risk management side i take it you have considered the insurance aspect of being covered from any potential liability in this case.
    Epoxy is certainly on the table, but I need to find out more about it.

    Liability is an issue that is addressed and covered.
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Bellingham
    Posts
    2,449
    Here is a good article about different wood glues, first published in Fine Woodworking and reposted over at Old Brown Glue.
    “When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece.” - John Ruskin
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.” - Oscar Wilde

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Satko View Post
    Here is a good article about different wood glues, first published in Fine Woodworking and reposted over at Old Brown Glue.
    Thanks for that, I remember reading the article but could not remember the results!

    So I guess I need to find some Titebond III
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    1,448
    I would specifically exclude polyurethane glue, of which Gorilla glue is a major brand. It does stick to slick surfaces (like something that was previously finished) and does expand to fill gaps, like sticking to a very rough surface like stone, but as it expands, it becomes foam-like, and that foam is VERY weak. I do use it occasionally, but never for joints that I can control. The only joint that I ever had fail (other than when I said "I wonder if I can just glue this to fix it") was with Gorilla glue - luckily I caught the mirror as the frame came apart.

    White PVA glue is reversible and flexible, but is not as strong as yellow glue. Both have enough creep that different species, with slightly different expansion characteristics, can be glued together. I use Elmer's carpenter's glue or Original Titebond - both are reversible with effort, and fill small gaps (the almost perfect joint). They have excellent adhesion to porous surfaces (unfinished wood). They have high initial tack (after the first few seconds, the joint is hard to slide). Titebond 2 and 3 are not reversible.

    I am a big fan of plastic resin glue - also called urea formaldehyde. (The amount of formaldehyde in a typical batch is smaller than the amount your body exhales daily). I buy powder that is mixed with water 20 minutes before use. It has a long open time, and no creep. A no-brain choice for veneer, excellent for bent-wood lamination (no creep is no spring-back), and also usable for work requiring a long open time. It has low initial tack, which may be good or bad, and cures in 8-12 hours.

    I occasionally use epoxy, but am not as expert as others on this forum.
    Charlie Plesums, Austin Texas
    (Retired early to become a custom furnituremaker)
    Lots of my free advice at www.solowoodworker.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Cape Cod, Ma.
    Posts
    1,553
    West Systems makes an epoxy that is flexible for wood applications
    Its called G Flex. You may wish to take a look at their specs.
    http://www.westsystem.com/ss/tough-f...superior-grip/
    He who laughs last, thinks slowest

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Billings Missouri near Springfield Mo
    Posts
    4,551
    Keep in mind Epoxy is brittle and will not hold up well to impact ...........all of them
    A Turn N Time
    Components for John Smith Organs and the Hobby Organ Builder

    Frog Pond Guitars


    Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

Similar Threads

  1. Cyanoacrylate glue vs super/krazy glue, loctite glue, etc
    By Mike Gager in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 10-20-2016, 09:53 PM
  2. Wood Glue
    By Doug DeVore in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 11-08-2010, 01:56 PM
  3. monkey wood glue???
    By Frank Fusco in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-28-2010, 09:28 PM
  4. 1/2 inch air flexible air hose
    By allen levine in forum New Tools
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 04-03-2009, 10:17 PM
  5. Gorilla Wood Glue
    By jim crockett in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 04-02-2008, 06:19 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •