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Thread: A Stool by Architect Edward Durell Stone

  1. #1
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    A Stool by Architect Edward Durell Stone

    Circa 1945



    A little morning sketching practice. Looks like another possible shop project that wouldn't be all the difficult to build.
    Last edited by Dave Richards; 03-31-2014 at 05:04 PM.
    Irony: The opposite of Wrinkly

  2. #2
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    I like it. The open design is really inviting. Nice job on the rendering to

    Not entirely sure how comfortable it would be with that much curve to the seat, I'd be tempted to back it off a smidge (which might ruin the lines but..).

  3. #3
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    Thanks Ryan.

    I was thinking the same thing about the depth of the seat. It measured out at about 2-1/2 in.

    As for the rendering, it's just straight out of SketchUp.
    Irony: The opposite of Wrinkly

  4. #4
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    I like it. Nicely done, Dave.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  5. #5
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    10Q

    By the way, for those who aren't familiar with Mr. Stone, he was the architect who designed the Kennedy Center for Performing Arts in D.C., The North Carolina State Legislative Building, and myriad other structures around the country.
    Last edited by Dave Richards; 03-27-2014 at 12:49 AM.
    Irony: The opposite of Wrinkly

  6. #6
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    I like it very much now how about an underside view to see the joints. Would not mind having a go at this like others have said it looks comfy. Thing is i would need it to fold up. Beats the canvas stuff. I think I have everything on hand to build one of these. Weather needs to sort itself out now i am getting antsy.

    Oh good drawing Dave.
    cheers

  7. #7
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    Rob, thanks.

    From what I can tell, the legs are tenoned into the second slat in or whatever you call it. The model is on my other computer but I could make a view of it in the morning and post it. I think making it fold would be a challenge.
    Last edited by Dave Richards; 03-27-2014 at 01:06 AM.
    Irony: The opposite of Wrinkly

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Richards View Post
    I think making it fold would be a challenge.
    But an interesting one I think the hard part would be to stabilize the legs so that they didn't go this-a-way and that-a-way when you sat down.

    If you offset the legs on one side by the width of the legs on the other side they could fold past each other. So that parts easy.
    Adding a pivot to the bottom of the slats probably not to hard.
    Thinking maybe a folding support from each leg to the opposite side to make a triangle like:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Not sure if that would suffice or not..

  9. #9
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    I could see that being built of three colors of wood. Beech legs and seat edges (light),

    Ebony (dark with heavy grain) seat interior slats and the big dowels,

    Teak (medium brown) seat slats altrenating with ebony, and a beach (light) slat down the center.

    With beach traingles driven into the ends of the ebony dowels to expand them and add visual interest.

    Maybe oversize them, like what they call a chair and a half (for your overwieght freinds) plus to add visual appeal to them.

    A pair of these in a living room by a fireplace maybe???

    I like the design of these.
    It's kind of fun to do the impossible

  10. #10
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    Yes, you could do all sorts of things to modify the design. I was only interested in drawing the piece as it was built; not re-designing it.

    Rob, here's a view from below.
    Last edited by Dave Richards; 03-27-2014 at 11:01 AM.
    Irony: The opposite of Wrinkly

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