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Thread: Crokinole finish???

  1. #1
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    Crokinole finish???

    So I am in the process of making a few Crokinole boards and I am wondering if anyone has any experience with the best finishes to use on Crokinole boards? I was thinking polyurethane or lacquer? The deck is made from 1/2" baltic birch plywood.
    "If they don't know you personally, don't take it personal."

  2. #2
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    Sorry I'm not much help Michael, but while surfing around learning what 'Crokinole' was about, I kept reading " the Hilinski site" has a been a world of help...don't know if you've been there, but there is a load of info that might be of interest.....Sounds like it can become an addicting game
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  3. #3
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    Hmm, now I was *sure* that crokinole was a Canadian-only thing...
    And I have no idea about "officially approved" finish. I would just treat it like a table and put on 3 or so coats of poly (or laquer) and buff it up. Might actually be TOO slippery!
    There's usually more than one way to do it...
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  4. #4
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    i would agree with art on this and tend to go to lacquer as that is my go to finish these days.. another good choice would be wipe on poly if you dont have spray equipment..
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  5. #5
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    Ok, thanks! -Ken, actually I have gotten most of my ideas from the Hilinski site Canadian Eh? Well maybe that is why I am building some
    Last edited by Michael Tulak; 04-21-2014 at 06:22 PM.
    "If they don't know you personally, don't take it personal."

  6. #6
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    Huh, first I'd heard of this game - looks amusing.

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crokinole Powder..
    "The use of any lubricating powder in crokinole is controversial, with some purists reviling the practice."
    "Boric acid powder is mostly used for this purpose." Umm, ok.. I do realize that its not THAT toxic but still..

    http://www.crokinole.com/faq.asp#15
    ". The best tournament crokinole boards are generally finished with fine-quality lacquers"

    Naively I'd think that poly would be to sticky, but maybe with a sufficient wax coat.. lacquer does sound like the best idea.

  7. #7
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    Never heard of Crokinole, but played Carrum all the time when I was younger. We used boric acid powder for lubrication...
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  8. #8
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    Ok, so I have decided to go with Lacquer and here is where some more advice is needed. I don't have any spray equipment/experience with using lacquer. What do you guys think? Should I get a sprayer to use with the air compressor or use lacquer from an aerosol can? I am making four boards (though I will only make one the first try) with approximately 5 sq' surface area on each board and of course there will be several coats on a board. I am pretty sure I am not going to use brushing lacquer, any objections? Advice, tips, concerns, and suggestions are welcomed thanks!
    "If they don't know you personally, don't take it personal."

  9. #9
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    I'd suggest using spray can lacquer, and applying 4 or more light coats. If you want a really smooth, glossy finish, put about a dozen light coats on the board, then lightly wet sand it with 600 grit wet/dry sandpaper on a sanding block. The idea behind the wet sanding is to remove the "orange peel" and level the surface without sanding all the way down to the bare wood. Follow that up with automotive polishing compound to bring back the glossy look (just follow the directions on the can) and you should have a very smooth surface. Here's an example of how that can look when it's done:

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  10. #10
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    Vaughn got it. if you take the wet sanding to 1000 grit then 2000 grit then buffing compound it will be a bit easier.
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