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Thread: Tools, after the Grinder - Then What?

  1. #1
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    Tools, after the Grinder - Then What?

    Hi All,

    My son who knows nothing about turning is trying to help me with my tool sharpening. As a matter of fact, he just pushed me out of the way and is now typing this . . .

    For those of you who use a Wolverine or shop made version thereof, once you do this:

    Attachment 83835

    or this:

    Attachment 83836

    What is your next step to sharpen and then hone the tool?

    Dad has a Jet clone of the Tormek. The geometry of the tool holders for the Jet is different than that of the Wolverine (or shop made version thereof).

    Attachment 83837 . Attachment 83838

    So speak oh vault of knowledge . . . what do-est thou?
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

  2. #2
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    I have been using a cloth wheel loaded with polishing compound. It works well, but I've just gone to a hard felt wheel loaded with polishing compound. It also seems to work well. For my skew I use my waterstones.

    I'd be interested to know what angles and dimensions you used to make those jigsfor different tools.
    Cheers,
    Roger


    The other member of Mensa, but not the NRA

    Everyone is a self-made person.

    "The thing about quotes on the internet is that you cannot confirm their veracity" -Abraham Lincoln

  3. #3
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    Honing is hit and miss for many. Well worth it on a skew, but as Dale Nish once said..."see that burr on this gouge?" He made one pass on a bowl blank..."Now it's gone." Being one of the best turners in the world...that got my attention. If you use the angle guide from Tormek (the proper term escapes me at the moment) you can duplicate the angle from the Wolverine set-up on the Grizzly.
    Your Respiratory Therapist wears Combat boots

  4. #4
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    For me, there is no next step. After the Wolverine, the tool is ready to cut. I use a diamond card hone to refresh the edge in between sharpenings.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Calver View Post
    For me, there is no next step. After the Wolverine, the tool is ready to cut. I use a diamond card hone to refresh the edge in between sharpenings.
    thanks Ted. Is this true when turning dry hardwoods?
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
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  6. #6
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    I'll echo Jim and Ted...although I hone my skews, I've not seen a noticeable improvement in the performance when honing a gouge. As for using the dry grinder vs. using the wet...I'd say pick one, but not both. Either will work fine, but there's no real benefit from using both. As you noticed, the jig geometry does not match up exactly, and it never really will. The vast majority of turners do just fine grinding their gouges with a 120 grit dry wheel. I prefer using my 400 grit wet wheel, but that's mostly because my Tormek jig is easier to set up and the wet grinding removes minimal steel. But if you were to hand me two gouges - one sharpened on a 120 grit dry wheel and the other sharpened on a 400 grit wet wheel - I doubt I could tell one from the other, especially after cutting for a minute or two.

    And this applies to both wet and dry wood, in my opinion. ;-)
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim C Bradley View Post
    thanks Ted. Is this true when turning dry hardwoods?
    For me - yep, although you might have to go back to the grinder a smidge more often than you would with green wood. The one exception is the skew and that's largely because I don't really like the shape of it off of the grinder, the hollow grind imho makes it "catchier" and so a somewhat flatter or even rounder edge is a bit more forgiving so I use a stone for that.

    That last shot of the gouge tip - is that a spindle detail gouge? if so.. I guess its ok, otoh if its a bowl gouge you'll want to "swing" it side to side more so it has more "wings" and a somewhat rounder nose or it'll be a bit funny to use.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    I'll echo Jim and Ted...although I hone my skews, I've not seen a noticeable improvement in the performance when honing a gouge. As for using the dry grinder vs. using the wet...I'd say pick one, but not both. Either will work fine, but there's no real benefit from using both. As you noticed, the jig geometry does not match up exactly, and it never really will. The vast majority of turners do just fine grinding their gouges with a 120 grit dry wheel. I prefer using my 400 grit wet wheel, but that's mostly because my Tormek jig is easier to set up and the wet grinding removes minimal steel. But if you were to hand me two gouges - one sharpened on a 120 grit dry wheel and the other sharpened on a 400 grit wet wheel - I doubt I could tell one from the other, especially after cutting for a minute or two.

    And this applies to both wet and dry wood, in my opinion. ;-)
    On another forum, I read how they recommend the use of the dry grinder, if changing profiles/making a custom gouge, and then finishing it off with the Tormek. This was simply for speed and making a wheel last.
    That said, multiple things I have read said the Tormek jigs work on the Jet. I know they work on the Grizzly (dad has that), and I have the Tormek (share the jigs). Tormek does have a jig to use their jigs on a dry grinder (parts of that came with my system).

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim C Bradley View Post
    thanks Ted. Is this true when turning dry hardwoods?
    As others have said, wet or dry wood doesn't make much difference. I also will hone my skews with the fine diamond card, but I don't go crazy with it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Mooney View Post
    For me - yep, although you might have to go back to the grinder a smidge more often than you would with green wood. The one exception is the skew and that's largely because I don't really like the shape of it off of the grinder, the hollow grind imho makes it "catchier" and so a somewhat flatter or even rounder edge is a bit more forgiving so I use a stone for that.

    That last shot of the gouge tip - is that a spindle detail gouge? if so.. I guess its ok, otoh if its a bowl gouge you'll want to "swing" it side to side more so it has more "wings" and a somewhat rounder nose or it'll be a bit funny to use.
    I didn't notice the profile on that last photo and agree it seems to want a little more 'wing', even for a spindle gouge.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Randal Stevenson View Post
    On another forum, I read how they recommend the use of the dry grinder, if changing profiles/making a custom gouge, and then finishing it off with the Tormek. This was simply for speed and making a wheel last.
    That said, multiple things I have read said the Tormek jigs work on the Jet. I know they work on the Grizzly (dad has that), and I have the Tormek (share the jigs). Tormek does have a jig to use their jigs on a dry grinder (parts of that came with my system).
    I agree about using the dry grinder for changing profiles or other cases where you need to remove more than just a little metal. I also have the pieces to use the Tormek jigs on my dry grinder, but still haven't gotten around to building the proper base and getting the other parts set up.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

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