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Thread: First turned box

  1. #1
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    First turned box

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    Ned
    -Ned

  2. #2
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    Addicted! You are now officially addicted. Good on you. Looking good. Looks like poplar? You have the mechanics down. Finesse will come. Keep at it!
    ++++++

    Some say the land of milk and honey; others say the land of fruits and nuts. All together my sort of heaven.

    Power is not taken. It is given. Who have you given yours to? Hmmmm?

    Carol Reed

  3. #3
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    Dec 2006
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    First turned box

    Thanks Carol, not poplar, maple. I always wondered about turned boxes. Now I 'get ' why they're so fun!
    When I parted the top off I lost the material in the center, so I get to turn a finial. Plus it needs a coat of wax or some such.

    Ned
    Last edited by Ned Bulken; 09-28-2014 at 06:46 AM.
    -Ned

  4. #4
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    Honestly, Ned I don't know why you think it needs a finial. I think it looks great just as it is.

    The beauty in a turned box to me is how carefully you choose the wood, particularly the end grain which is in some ways the most prominent part of a box. If the end grain is dull you can inlay a contrasting piece of wood to brighten it up and make it beautiful. I do that all the time with plain old maple, curly maple, quilted maple and birdseye maple. The long grain of those woods is beautiful but the end grain is blah. Inlaying something else to dress it up makes a bland box into something special.

    For example here is a maple box with a scrap of koa inlaid into the top.Click image for larger version. 

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    I may be getting a little older physically but mentally I'm still tarp as a shack.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Stafford View Post
    Honestly, Ned I don't know why you think it needs a finial. I think it looks great just as it is.

    The beauty in a turned box to me is how carefully you choose the wood, particularly the end grain which is in some ways the most prominent part of a box. If the end grain is dull you can inlay a contrasting piece of wood to brighten it up and make it beautiful. I do that all the time with plain old maple, curly maple, quilted maple and birdseye maple. The long grain of those woods is beautiful but the end grain is blah. Inlaying something else to dress it up makes a bland box into something special.

    For example here is a maple box with a scrap of koa inlaid into the top.Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	86236Click image for larger version. 

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    Mike, when I parted off the lid from the blank everything was going fine... until the last 1/4 "... which broke off and stayed with the scrap part. It just tore out, leaving a rough edge. Design mod opportunity, not that I had much of a design beyond 'make a box.' I'm about to head back out to the shop, I'm visiting friends and want to turn a NE bowl for them.
    -Ned

  6. #6
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    Nice box, Ned. You're hooked for sure. Now firewood will never look the same and if you hear chainsaws in the neighborhood you will go see if it's turnable and beg a few chunks, and you will always slow down to check out every pile of wood you see out by the curb.

  7. #7
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    Ted, yep. I can see it now...

    Is it 'bad' that I just ordered another turning tool, and a couple of pen kits? (might as well, since I was on PSI already)
    -Ned

  8. #8
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    Great job Ned!! Print off Mikes tutorial if you haven't all ready...the Gold standard by which all others are judged. You are on a roll!!
    Your Respiratory Therapist wears Combat boots

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ned Bulken View Post
    Mike, when I parted off the lid from the blank everything was going fine... until the last 1/4 "... which broke off and stayed with the scrap part. It just tore out, leaving a rough edge. Design mod opportunity, not that I had much of a design beyond 'make a box.' I'm about to head back out to the shop, I'm visiting friends and want to turn a NE bowl for them.
    Ned, somehow the fact that you ended up with a hole in the lid totally escaped me. I still think that you could inlay a contrasting piece of wood that would be visible from both sides. I re-read your post and now understand that you first hollowed the lid and then parted it off from the main blank. If you are going to use that technique you have to 'measure twice' and leave enough wood to keep that splitting from happening. If you follow the box turning steps advised by Raffan that kind of thing will not happen very often.

    I suggest you spend a couple of dollars and buy Richard Raffan's video and book entitled Turning Boxes. The hollowing can be done without a Forstner bit. I can hollow out a box in less time than it takes you to set up and use a Forstner. The inside rounded hollow you have could be cleaned up/squared up in just a minute or two with a square scraper. Square boxes should have an interior that closely resembles/mimics the exterior.

    Learning to use a square scraper is an important step in creating boxes with suction fit lids.

    If you are interested I will be happy to send you a PDF of one of my box turning articles. Just PM an e-mail address.
    Last edited by Mike Stafford; 09-28-2014 at 02:42 PM.
    I may be getting a little older physically but mentally I'm still tarp as a shack.

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Thomasville, GA
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    Good job, Ned! You're gettin' there!!!
    Bill Arnold
    Citizen of Texas residing in Georgia.
    NRA Life Member and Member of Mensa
    My Weather Underground station

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