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Thread: Cutting Board with Bent Laminations

  1. #1
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    Cutting Board with Bent Laminations

    I saw one of these in an email . . . from Fine Woodworking I think. Dad's neighbors have been very helpful since mom passed and I wanted to thank them. I feel it is presumptuous to give someone a wall cabinet or picture frame that may not be their style. Since she likes to cook and he likes to eat, I thought this would work well. I wasn't real sure how to go about it so I just blatantly copied the picture although I believe mine is smaller. I used hard maple as the basis for the blank and walnut, cherry and padouk for the inlay. I glued up the blank, marked out a curve that I liked, transferred that curve to a pattern and faired the curve with a file.

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    Clamp the pattern to the blank and use a template collar on the router to route a curved groove. Saw the blank apart on the bandsaw, smooth the inside edges and clamp the first laminated inlay between the halves restoring the blank to rectangular.

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    This was my first go at this thing so I went overkill on the clamps .

    Cont'd . . . .
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 10-04-2014 at 02:25 AM.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  2. #2
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    You clamp the pattern in place and use the router to trim the extra wide laminate down to near-flush. I used a card scraper to get it on down to flush on both sides.

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    You decide on where your next curve will be cut, clamp on the pattern and route a curved groove . . . again. Cut along the groove on the bandsaw . . . again, etc. And then do it yet again.

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    Once the lamination parts are all in I used a beam compass to draw some curves on all four outer edges. I bandsaw'd these near the line and then rasped/sanded to the line. I rigged up a piece of scrap as a concave "fence" for the router table and here's the first pass on the finger grips.

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    I''' cut them a bit deeper and ease the sharp edges. Then I'll scrape/plane/sand it to suit and give it a mineral oil soak.
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 10-04-2014 at 02:26 AM.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  3. #3
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    way cool! but i think you could have gotten one or two more clamps in there....
    benedictione omnes bene

    www.burroviejowoodworking.com

    check out my etsy store, buroviejowoodworking

  4. #4
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    That came out nice. I like the finger grip technique. That would be an interesting pattern on a drawer front.

  5. #5
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    Very nice. I've done similar laminations for a few different flatwork projects, but without the cool crossing curves you did.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

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  6. #6
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    Glen
    That is Avery neat looking board. Your friend will be delighted but will be afraid to use it.
    Does give me some thoughts for future project.
    Much bueno
    David

  7. #7
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    Here it is with the final shaping and smoothing.

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    And a first flood of mineral oil.

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    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
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  8. #8
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    Nice board Glenn. How do you rout your finger grooves without burning at the ends?
    I have never been able to do them without at least a little burning.
    I'm supposed to respect my elders, but its getting harder and harder for me to find one now.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Hans View Post
    Nice board Glenn. How do you rout your finger grooves without burning at the ends?
    I have never been able to do them without at least a little burning.
    I run the bit slow since it is on the large size and do the groove in steps (which helps me practice the movements). For the last pass I "adjust" the fence back by tapping it with the heel of my hand. This gives me a very light last pass that I do fairly quickly (now that I have had practice) .
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 10-05-2014 at 01:47 AM.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  10. #10
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    Excellent board, Glenn! I really like the inlay and shaping on it.
    Bill Arnold
    Citizen of Texas residing in Georgia.
    NRA Life Member and Member of Mensa
    My Weather Underground station

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