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Thread: YACB Yet Another Cherry Bowl

  1. #1
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    YACB Yet Another Cherry Bowl











    I didn't measure it, but I'd guess it is about 6.5" across and 4-5" tall. Bagged with shavings. revisit/return in a couple of months.
    -Ned

  2. #2
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    Like it!!!
    Your Respiratory Therapist wears Combat boots

  3. #3
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    Looking good, Ned. One suggestion I'd make is to use the roughing-out time to practice your finishing cuts. For one, it's easier to make the different types of cuts on green wood, and by leaving a smoother rough-out, you'll make the real finish turning easier. Things like the ridges in the bottom of this bowl are easier to handle now, when the wood is green, compared to later when it's dry.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  4. #4
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    Lookin' good, Ned. I like working with cherry.
    Cheers,
    Roger


    The other member of Mensa, but not the NRA

    Everyone is a self-made person.

    "The thing about quotes on the internet is that you cannot confirm their veracity" -Abraham Lincoln

  5. #5
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    Nice looking bowl.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  6. #6
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    Thanks y'all!
    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    Looking good, Ned. One suggestion I'd make is to use the roughing-out time to practice your finishing cuts. For one, it's easier to make the different types of cuts on green wood, and by leaving a smoother rough-out, you'll make the real finish turning easier. Things like the ridges in the bottom of this bowl are easier to handle now, when the wood is green, compared to later when it's dry.
    Vaughn, I make 'every' cut as a practice cut. I hear you though. This bowl was 'tough' for a cherry bowl I had a hard time with parts of it, there was a resonance zone where every cut was 'hard' due to a grain change. It didn't matter what gouge or angle of attack I took, it vibrated and fought the gouge with every cut. I see that bump at the bottom of the bowl, as soon as I get some coffee in me, I'll see what I can do to eliminate that bump. I'm trying with every bowl to make them as smooth as I can from the get-go. I'm learning that I need to sharpen more often of course, so I start each session with a quick trip on the wheel, then as needed following that.
    -Ned

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ned Bulken View Post
    Thanks y'all!


    Vaughn, I make 'every' cut as a practice cut. I hear you though. This bowl was 'tough' for a cherry bowl I had a hard time with parts of it, there was a resonance zone where every cut was 'hard' due to a grain change. It didn't matter what gouge or angle of attack I took, it vibrated and fought the gouge with every cut. I see that bump at the bottom of the bowl, as soon as I get some coffee in me, I'll see what I can do to eliminate that bump. I'm trying with every bowl to make them as smooth as I can from the get-go. I'm learning that I need to sharpen more often of course, so I start each session with a quick trip on the wheel, then as needed following that.
    Good deal.

    Generally, the vibration is the result of dull tools and/or trying to take too big of a cut. If it's still vibrating with light cuts after a trip to the grinder, try changing the speed of the lathe. Often, a slower or faster speed will side-step the resonance issue. I've also had vibration problems sometimes when I was using smaller, lighter tools. (This is particularly true with scrapers. I always had issues with scrapers until I started using big fat honkin' heavy ones.) Speaking of scrapers, that would be my go-to tool for removing the ridges at the bottom of that bowl.

    In addition to all the critique and suggestions I've been sending your way, I do want to mention that your forms are looking good. You're progressing nicely...most of us have been down the same roads. Just yesterday I was packing up some of my earlier turned pieces, and I was kind of shocked to see how heavy and clunky some of them were. One bowl in particular had walls that were only about 1/4" thick at the rim, but they got thicker as they went down, eventually ending with a bottom that's probably 1" or more thick. I handed it to my wife and she was shocked to see how heavy it felt.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    Good deal.

    Generally, the vibration is the result of dull tools and/or trying to take too big of a cut. If it's still vibrating with light cuts after a trip to the grinder, try changing the speed of the lathe. Often, a slower or faster speed will side-step the resonance issue. I've also had vibration problems sometimes when I was using smaller, lighter tools. (This is particularly true with scrapers. I always had issues with scrapers until I started using big fat honkin' heavy ones.) Speaking of scrapers, that would be my go-to tool for removing the ridges at the bottom of that bowl.

    In addition to all the critique and suggestions I've been sending your way, I do want to mention that your forms are looking good. You're progressing nicely...most of us have been down the same roads. Just yesterday I was packing up some of my earlier turned pieces, and I was kind of shocked to see how heavy and clunky some of them were. One bowl in particular had walls that were only about 1/4" thick at the rim, but they got thicker as they went down, eventually ending with a bottom that's probably 1" or more thick. I handed it to my wife and she was shocked to see how heavy it felt.
    I'll have to try that the next time I have a hard time in mid cut. Of course changing speeds means a big jump for my little lathe. #beltchangestinks Oh well, my next lathe will have electronic VS or else.

    Thanks for All of the feedback, I enjoy that process, and as you can see, I do try and apply the lessons. Can't learn if no one says you've got room to improve. I watch a lot of videos on youtube, replay Bill G's dvd's and practice practice practice. I can't quite say a bowl a day, but certainly one per week!
    -Ned

  9. #9
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    Ned,
    On deep bowls with steeper sides it's tough to ride the bevel of a regular grind gouge all the way through the transition to the center. You end up doing a lot of sanding at the transition because you can't get a nice smooth cut. That's why the gouge sometimes gets away from you and you get catches or those ripples on the bottom. A trick I learned in a class was to dedicate a cheapo 1/2" bowl gouge as a 'bowl bottom' gouge. Grind the face square and then put a 70 degree bevel on it. It gets presented horizontally at the center line and the wings will start cutting at about the transition point and you can ride the bevel all the way across the bottom of the bowl. The result is a very smooth, finish ready surface that doesn't need a lot of sanding.
    Click image for larger version. 

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