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Thread: Japanese Doll Maker

  1. #1
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    Japanese Doll Maker

    Interesting how he turns these with only one end supported on the lathe.

    http://www.dump.com/japanesedoll/
    Jesus was a Woodworker

  2. #2
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    Ahh, the Kokeishi dolls.... it's fascinating watching him work with only a can like chuck on the one end... it's an interesting tool that he uses also... with some kind of hook in the end of it... his lathe looks like just the motor part, no change in speed or spindle, just a motor.

    I've read that some of those dolls from some of the more re-known turners can go for pretty big $$. I want to try one some day, but haven't yet... I do pattern some of my pepper mills after them.
    Chuck
    Tellico Plains, TN
    https://www.etsy.com/shop/TellicoTurnings
    My parents taught me to respect my elders, but it's getting harder and harder to find any.
    If you go looking for trouble, it will usually find you.

  3. #3
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    Great talent there!!!

    Thanks for posting, Dan.
    Bill Arnold
    Citizen of Texas residing in Georgia.
    NRA Life Member and Member of Mensa
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  4. #4
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    Japanese turners have some interesting methods that seem foreign to us Westerners, but they definitely have the process figured out. Thanks for the video, Dan.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  5. #5
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    Waiting to have Stuart chime in on this very interesting video. Thanks Dan.
    "You got to learn from the mistakes of others. You won't live long enough to make them all yourself". (Author unknown)

    "Time flies like..... an arrow,,,Fruit flies like..... a banana." Groucho Marx

    Ah,,,to live in Paradise!

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  6. #6
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    Wow thanks for posting that link Dan never knew of these. As Bill says talent there.

    I was fascinated by the painting and how there is no bleed on the lines. Wonder how the ink/paint is constituted to prevent bleed or do you think there is finish applied first.

    Anyone have an idea of the type of wood and its hardness?

    I love this kind of genuine local art/craft and have purchased a fair bit from various countries in my past travels. Only problem becomes what to do with it.
    Got me thinking if a guy like this has an apprentice that will keep this going into the future.


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    cheers

  7. #7
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    I wonder how long that gentleman has sat there, year after year, turning the same thing over and over... I do not think I could do that, even if I had the talent
    "We the People ......"

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Keeble View Post
    Wow thanks for posting that link Dan never knew of these. As Bill says talent there.

    I was fascinated by the painting and how there is no bleed on the lines. Wonder how the ink/paint is constituted to prevent bleed or do you think there is finish applied first.

    Anyone have an idea of the type of wood and its hardness?

    I love this kind of genuine local art/craft and have purchased a fair bit from various countries in my past travels. Only problem becomes what to do with it.
    Got me thinking if a guy like this has an apprentice that will keep this going into the future.


    Sent from my SGH-I337M using Tapatalk
    According to Wikipedia, the woods are cherry or dogwood... the cherry for hardness and the dogwood for softer woods.
    Chuck
    Tellico Plains, TN
    https://www.etsy.com/shop/TellicoTurnings
    My parents taught me to respect my elders, but it's getting harder and harder to find any.
    If you go looking for trouble, it will usually find you.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Baideme View Post
    Waiting to have Stuart chime in on this very interesting video. Thanks Dan.
    It is very interesting, but I know I'm going to sound like a jerk, but when you consider that is all the guy does, no other form, maybe different sizes, but nothing like a bowl or a cup or a platter etc. then it is, to me, less impressive. If you did the same thing for 8 hours a day, six days a week for the vast majority of your life, you should be good at it, period.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Keeble View Post
    Wow thanks for posting that link Dan never knew of these. As Bill says talent there.

    I was fascinated by the painting and how there is no bleed on the lines. Wonder how the ink/paint is constituted to prevent bleed or do you think there is finish applied first.

    Anyone have an idea of the type of wood and its hardness?

    I love this kind of genuine local art/craft and have purchased a fair bit from various countries in my past travels. Only problem becomes what to do with it.
    Got me thinking if a guy like this has an apprentice that will keep this going into the future.
    The paint is not a paint it is actually an ink, and he uses a Fude which is a brush that is designed to write with.
    He will turn a bunch of them then sit down and paint them all, he does one color on each one at a time, then changes color and does the next one so ink is dry from the previous one.

    Most of these guys are at the age where they are dying off, and they do not have anyone taking over their business, but there are a few that make a decent living at it, so it will not completely disappear, yet.

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Douglass View Post
    I wonder how long that gentleman has sat there, year after year, turning the same thing over and over... I do not think I could do that, even if I had the talent
    I totally agree!

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck Ellis View Post
    Ahh, the Kokeishi dolls.... it's fascinating watching him work with only a can like chuck on the one end... it's an interesting tool that he uses also... with some kind of hook in the end of it... his lathe looks like just the motor part, no change in speed or spindle, just a motor.

    I've read that some of those dolls from some of the more re-known turners can go for pretty big $$. I want to try one some day, but haven't yet... I do pattern some of my pepper mills after them.
    This type of turning they turn on the underside of the wood, they use tools that they make themselves in their own blacksmith shop. Except for the electric motor they are making these about the same way they did well over 100 years ago, maybe add sandpaper to that, but otherwise it is the same. The cup chuck is very cool for that application.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck Ellis View Post
    According to Wikipedia, the woods are cherry or dogwood... the cherry for hardness and the dogwood for softer woods.
    You are correct Chuck and there is also a Japanese Maple that is used, but I cannot recall what it is called, I could google it, but the name will mean nothing to any of us

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
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  10. #10
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    Thanks Stu, you make a good point about the "talent" aspect. I share Pauls point of how people manage to do the same thing for everyday of their life.
    But then there are many that do work daily that is incredibly defined and routine and i know for sure i could never do even a single day of repetition. I battle come Xmas time making multiples of the same item for gifts.
    Stu is that any specific ink or is it available commercially? I use a fountain pen often and normal ink in those even bleeds on some paper i just cant see it not bleeding on wood.

    Sent from my SGH-I337M using Tapatalk
    cheers

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