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Thread: Waterlox?

  1. #1
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    Waterlox?

    Question here. I have a client that has hired me to add a pair of leaf extensions to her dining table. The table is tiger maple with an amber dye and the top coat has me perplexed. It doesn't look like lacquer or varnish but more of a hand rubbed finish. BUT there is some sort of film but very very slight.
    Im wondering if it was an accumulation of multiple coats of oil such as waterlox.

    Unfortunately there is no "inconspicuous" place I can employ the usual methods of testing a finish as this "top coat" is only on the top and sides of the table not on the underside.
    She told me that she wasn't looking for a perfect match as she would most likely be using a table cloth when the leaves are on, but.... I would much rather give her a product that looks like its always been there.

    Having never used waterlox before and only looking at the pictures on their website it appears the closest to what she has. But pictures are known to lie...

    Also the table is 15 years old and... unfortunately the gentleman that made it has closed his doors so I cant find him to ask....


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    He who laughs last, thinks slowest

  2. #2
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    Looks like a straight maple dye stain, you should be able to match that with nitro.
    I dream a lot. I do more painting when I'm not painting. It's in the subconscious.
    ::: Andrew Wyeth :::
    colonialrestorationstudio.com

  3. #3
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    sweet Thanks Dave!
    Standard M L Campbells or equivalent or something more like MagnaMax?
    He who laughs last, thinks slowest

  4. #4
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    If you have Mag on hand. Are you going to use the water dye stain. It's the best Ive used. If so. one that maple you will need to sand a number of times before applying the dye., That maple will fur up on ya. So sand , take a damp reg and wipe the table , dry it with a hair dryer and repeat 3or 4 time till the furring is down. Then add the dye stand and then 2 coats of sealer before using 320 or 400 sand paper. Sometime if I take it far enough I can use 600, Hope that helps.
    I dream a lot. I do more painting when I'm not painting. It's in the subconscious.
    ::: Andrew Wyeth :::
    colonialrestorationstudio.com

  5. #5
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    Dave is the man for matching.

    You seem to be concerned by the final finish - the pictures look like a thin layer of lacquer rubbed out. I routinely apply gloss lacquer, and then rub it out to a thin film layer, that looks almost like an oiled finish. Rubbing to me means machine sanding with a very fine grit (400 is coarse, normally get to 800 or as high as 1500 to get the sheen I want.)

    I switched from Nitro (solvent lacquer) to Target 6000 (water base acrylic lacquer) and get the same appearance, and a more durable finish. If I want a super durable finish I do the same with Target 9300 polycarbonate finish
    Charlie Plesums, Austin Texas
    (Retired early to become a custom furnituremaker)
    Lots of my free advice at www.solowoodworker.com

  6. #6
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    If the old finish has an amber tone to it. I usually will take Antique Oak stain and Green. mix 70/30 and add to the finish. Testing for tone is advisable. This would be done with one light coat before the finial coat.
    I dream a lot. I do more painting when I'm not painting. It's in the subconscious.
    ::: Andrew Wyeth :::
    colonialrestorationstudio.com

  7. #7
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    Thanks guys,
    I had been planning to use transtint with DA but if there is a better solution Im all ears.
    The other issue and its not that easy to see in the pics is that the table is hand scraped. I can probably tighten the grain up with some hand sanding but don't want to take away from that look.
    Charlie, does the target lacquer amber up when it cures or does it remain water clear? For safety sake I would prefer to use wb as I have to spray inside now and both the furnace and waterheater have active pilots going.. don't want anything to go boom lol

    what I have on hand for transtint
    mission brown
    medium brown
    dark walnut
    orange
    vintage maple
    blue
    and
    Bordeaux
    He who laughs last, thinks slowest

  8. #8
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    Mission brown and a bit of orange may get you In the area. You can always use brushing lacquer. Sanding between coats taking it up to 2000 grit, (water sanding) them buffing. Boom is not good !
    I dream a lot. I do more painting when I'm not painting. It's in the subconscious.
    ::: Andrew Wyeth :::
    colonialrestorationstudio.com

  9. #9
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    sweet Thanks Dave! Ill play around with some scraps this weekend and see what I can come up with
    He who laughs last, thinks slowest

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Soby View Post
    ...
    Charlie, does the target lacquer amber up when it cures or does it remain water clear? ...
    Rich, the EM6000 starts white and dries clear. I have never considered it to have any amber, and it definitely does not "amber up" over time.

    The EM1000 starts clear and stays clear. The EM2000 interior/exterior varnish does have a distinctive amber tone. The EM8000 cv has a very slight (to my eye) amber - but the color is stable. I haven't used EM9000 interior polyurethane. I love EM9300 interior exterior clear - but I found a zinger on a full sun outdoor project. The finish remained stable but the dye that I added as a toner faded, so it now looks like EM9300 on bare wood.
    Charlie Plesums, Austin Texas
    (Retired early to become a custom furnituremaker)
    Lots of my free advice at www.solowoodworker.com

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