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Thread: Lacquer

  1. #1

    Lacquer

    Anyone mixing and sparying lacquer? Like a water base lacquer? Is it actaully thinned with water?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Turner View Post
    Anyone mixing and sparying lacquer? Like a water base lacquer? Is it actaully thinned with water?
    I use a fair amount of Target's EM6000, and I like it a lot. I spray it straight out of the can (no thinning) using a gravity feed HLVP sprayer, with a 1.2mm tip.

    I also use the EM1000 sanding sealer, and the EM8000cv conversion varnish.

    The EM6000 is water clear, and can be tinted with Transtint dyes.
    The EM8000cv has an amber tint to it, and looks much like an oil-based product after it cures.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  3. #3
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    I spray EM6000 straight from the can. It can be thinned with distilled water, if necessary. Up to 50% distilled water can be used if you want to use it as a sealer, but I use EM1000 Sealer before topcoating.

    Here's more info:
    http://www.targetcoatings.com/images...letin_v9.0.pdf
    Bill Arnold
    Citizen of Texas residing in Georgia.
    NRA Life Member and Member of Mensa
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  4. #4
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    All waterborne finishes are actually an acrylic finish, though they can choose to call themselves whatever they want (some put a small dollop of urethane resin in them and label themselves "polyurethane"). Anyway, you can buy these ready to spray, and that's what i do. They are thinned by water (read the label) but the chemistry is picky about how much. So the ready to use (whether it's brush or spray) is a little more important. Clean up of the spray gun is easy, but must be thorough (DAHIKT) because any left in the gun to dry becomes really, really hard to remove.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim DeLaney View Post
    ...
    The EM6000 is water clear, and can be tinted with Transtint dyes.
    The EM8000cv has an amber tint to it, and looks much like an oil-based product after it cures.
    I, too, am a huge fan of Target Coatings, and also use the EM9300 for exterior surfaces and when I need a super hard finish.

    The amber tint of the EM8000cv is slight - I had to check the specs to confirm Jim's comment. With that and other Target products, you can add Amber Transtint if you want more yellow.



    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Arnold View Post
    I spray EM6000 straight from the can. It can be thinned with distilled water, if necessary. Up to 50% distilled water can be used if you want to use it as a sealer, but I use EM1000 Sealer before topcoating....
    I used EM6000 as a sealer for a long time, but finally realized it doesn't pop the natural color of the wood as well as EM1000. That in itself is enough reason to keep EM1000 in stock.

    I am told EM1000 thinned 50% with water is a great pre-stain conditioner, but I avoid stain as much as possible, so that is what I hear, not what I have done myself.




    Quote Originally Posted by fred hargis View Post
    All waterborne finishes are actually an acrylic finish, though they can choose to call themselves whatever they want (some put a small dollop of urethane resin in them and label themselves "polyurethane"). .....
    Maybe that is why Target Coatings works so much better than other water base finishes I have tried. Target uses emulsion technology to suspend substantial real varnish or polyurethane or whatever in their finish - much as soap is an emulsion that suspends grease. (That is why they emphasize EmTech, or Emulsion Technology in their product names.) Their lacquer is based on acrylic rather than cellulose - "lacquer" auto finishes have been acrylic for decades, but only recently has the technology allowed a single component acrylic finish rather than special guns that mixed components at the last instant, as was required to factory paint autos 40 years ago.
    Charlie Plesums, Austin Texas
    (Retired early to become a custom furnituremaker)
    Lots of my free advice at www.solowoodworker.com

  6. #6
    Thanks you guys. I have seen the target finish mentioned on other sites so I beleive I will have to try it.

    Any sanding and rubbing this finish to a mirror finish? Like on a jewerly box or something along those lines?

    EDIT: Opps Sorry I just seen some examples of polished finishes. Nice. This looks like it will be my favorite finish.
    Last edited by Scott Turner; 11-06-2014 at 03:31 PM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by fred hargis View Post
    ... Clean up of the spray gun is easy, but must be thorough (DAHIKT) because any left in the gun to dry becomes really, really hard to remove.
    That, too! Cleanup is simple when done shortly after you finish spraying. Yep, I've left both the sealer and topcoats in a gun and went about doing other things for a couple of days. In that case, I washed out what I could with warm, soapy water. Then, I soaked the parts in acetone after running some through the gun. If I clean the gun as I should, I still put some denatured alcohol through it to clear out the rinse water.
    Bill Arnold
    Citizen of Texas residing in Georgia.
    NRA Life Member and Member of Mensa
    My Weather Underground station

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Arnold View Post
    That, too! Cleanup is simple when done shortly after you finish spraying. Yep, I've left both the sealer and topcoats in a gun and went about doing other things for a couple of days. In that case, I washed out what I could with warm, soapy water. Then, I soaked the parts in acetone after running some through the gun. If I clean the gun as I should, I still put some denatured alcohol through it to clear out the rinse water.
    I've left finish in my guns for several days - especially when a finishing job takes longer - or takes many coats. I've never had a problem with subsequent cleaning of the gun. I run water through the gun, followed bu a couple ounces of "Airbrush Cleaner" (available at hobby stores, etc.) then more water, then finally a bit of alcohol to dry everything out.
    Jim D.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim DeLaney View Post
    I've left finish in my guns for several days - especially when a finishing job takes longer - or takes many coats. I've never had a problem with subsequent cleaning of the gun. I run water through the gun, followed bu a couple ounces of "Airbrush Cleaner" (available at hobby stores, etc.) then more water, then finally a bit of alcohol to dry everything out.
    And this is the answer to a question I was looking for. I've been spraying some chairs with the EM8000CV and I'm getting a little tired of cleaning the gun every coat, especially since I'm doing 5 coats and can only do 1 side of the parts per coat.

    I can get the whole batch sprayed today I reckon if I do one side, let it dry an hour, flip, do the other side, repeat.

    Have to say as a novice sprayer, I'm impressed with the results I'm getting. I credit the materials, not the skill of the person doing the application.
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
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  10. #10
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    I have left all the Target finishes in the gun for several days. I am not a careful as Jim with the cleaning... just large quantities of warm water, and a green scratchy sponge on the feed tube and any crystalization on the inside of the cup (occasionally with EM6000)

    EM8000cv is varnish, not a lacquer, so there is no natural burn-in. However, if you put additional coats on before the first are fully cured, you get burn in between coats (very desirable). Therefore With 8000 I would put the extra coats on in hours, not days. I find I can even dry sand (to get forgiveness for spraying flaws) after an hour or so - but find that I need it to cure (5 days) before wet sanding.
    Charlie Plesums, Austin Texas
    (Retired early to become a custom furnituremaker)
    Lots of my free advice at www.solowoodworker.com

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