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Thread: Do you recognize this buffing compound?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    112

    Do you recognize this buffing compound?

    Hi, ran across this gray buffing compound and I really don't know what it is. I got it from Don Pencil (I think) a long time ago as something he threw in as a freebie. Something he often did since his shipments always went out later than expected. At least that was my experience. Anyway, he always made up for it with some little bonus in the shipment, and this was one. Trouble is I don't know what it's for or where it fits in a grit scale. It has never been pictured on his website, although he did list a PL compound and I'm wondering if this is PL. Thanks, Ken

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Independence, Kentucky
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    1,354
    I would say it's White Diamond for the looks of it.
    I twill polish Steel and make it look like bright chrome
    I'm supposed to respect my elders, but its getting harder and harder for me to find one now.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    S E Washington State
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    3,777
    It looks to me to be one of the buffing compounds for metal, the White Diamond I have is white. Maybe it is this: http://www.amazon.com/Gray-Polishing.../dp/B003L2IKRO
    "We the People ......"

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    112
    Thanks for the guesses so far. It's definitely not white diamond, I'm familiar with that. The photo might be a shade light. It is light to mid gray color.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    ABQ NM
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    Ken, I can say with certainty that's Don's "PL" compound, used for poly or lacquer. It's intended as a single-compound approach to the standard tripoli/white diamond combination. Put it on an unused buffing wheel, and buff at no more than about 800 rpm. You can get pretty aggressive with the buffing as long as you keep the speed down. After buffing, wipe down the piece with a clean piece of t-shirt material to remove any residue. I follow up with Renaissance wax, applied by hand and buffed out with a clean buffing wheel at about 1000 rpm. It's now my preferred buffing routine.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
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    112
    Thanks Vaughn. I was hoping it was the PL. He actually sent a clean buffing wheel - soft type stamped WAX - along with it. I've been trying some rattle can lacquer on some smaller pieces lately and will put it to use. Couple more questions as long as your here. Any recommendations as to whether this is the correct type of buffing wheel or should I save this one for the Ren Wax and get something else for the PL? Can you use the same wax wheel for both carnauba and Ren Wax?

    Ken

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,014
    I think the wheel I'm using for the PL compound is the same linen material as the white diamond wheel. (Can't check right now because the whole shop is in storage at the moment.) It's whatever wheel Don sent me with the compound when he first started selling it. But looking at his site now, I see he's suggesting the same flannel wheel for both wax and PL compound. So perhaps he's changed his recommendation?

    I don't think I'd use the same wheel for carnauba and Ren wax. When I started doing the 3-wheel buffing routine, I tried carnauba and didn't like it much at all. I ended up using a buffing wheel rake to remove as much of the carnauba residue as possible from the wheel, and since then have only used the wheel for Ren wax. The main difference is that you apply carnauba directly to the wheel, then use the wheel to apply the wax to the piece and shine it, but with Ren wax you apply the wax directly to the piece, let it dry, then use the buffing wheel just to shine things up. The Ren wax leaves virtually no residue on the wheel, but with the carnauba, you intentionally build up wax on the wheel. As inexpensive as buffing wheels are, I'd suggest just using a separate one for each type of wax.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

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