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Thread: Shellawax Cream

  1. #1
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    Shellawax Cream

    Has anyone ever used this on flatwork, rubbed to a shine by hand? It's in the LV catalogue, and it says it has lots of applications, and not just for turned projects.
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  2. #2
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    What kind of flatwork? Shelawax is a shellac/wax blend that relies on the heat from friction to bring out a shine, and compared to other finishes, it's not very durable. It looks pretty on something that doesn't get handled, but I'd not put it on anything that sees any use.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    What kind of flatwork? Shelawax is a shellac/wax blend that relies on the heat from friction to bring out a shine...
    Gee, I don't know....a box? I was looking at was on p. 310, and on the next page I saw the Shellawax. It says it's "suitable for a range of applications, from larger turnings to carvings or furniture, it hand-buffs to a semi-gloss sheen" and "works into crevices and moldings." I just thought it might be something interesting to try if the lathe isn't required......
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  4. #4
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    Just because you read that on the Internet doesn't make it true. Lots of other finishes as easy and far better than Shellawax for flat work, wipe on poly for one I can quickly think of!
    Mack C. in Brooklin ON
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mack Cameron View Post
    Just because you read that on the Internet doesn't make it true....
    No? Really? C'mon, Mack....I'm gonna try it!
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cynthia White View Post
    No? Really? C'mon, Mack....I'm gonna try it!
    Then it behooves the question; why did you ask for an opinion on it's use?
    Mack C. in Brooklin ON
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mack Cameron View Post
    Then it behooves the question; why did you ask for an opinion on it's use?
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  8. #8
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    I asked the question because as Vaughn said, it's a friction polish usually used by turners. However, in the Lee Valley catalogue, as well as in the information supplied by the manufacturer, apparently the stuff can be applied and rubbed in by hand without high friction. So I wondered if anyone had ever tried it and rubbed it in by hand.
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  9. #9
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    I have used the stuff on turnings and in my view even on turnings its not easy to get it to come to life. I certainly would not like to try it on a naked piece of say a coffee table top and expect to polish that out to some sort of shining finish. Maybe if i used an automotive polisher buff i might try but as said there are other methods way easier and with longer lasting results.
    The product in my view has very good marketing material rather powerful and convincing but my own practical experience did not leave me thinking this is an easy go to finish. My 2 c

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  10. #10
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    The product is little more than shellac with a heavy wax content. It won't make a durable finish for anything that'll be handled or subjected to wear.

    Pure shellac will be more durable, but will still not be water and alcohol resistant on a table top. For that, you need a good lacquer, varnish, or Polyurethane finish. Target's EM8000 waterborne conversion varnish is what I'd use, or if you prefer solvent based, then maybe Behlen's Rock Hard Tabletop Finish.
    Jim D.
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