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Thread: another drum sander question

  1. #1
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    another drum sander question

    I own a 22-44 performax/jet drum sander.

    first, Im running as light a pass I can each time, with 80 grit, I still get sanding lines going down that must be orbitally sanded out. No way I can get a finished product out of the drum sander. Is this normal?

    second, Ive purchased cut your own belts from 2 sources, my now gone tool guy, and another tool guy, both brands I didn't like, they rip easily, (yes they were cheap), but I want that linen type sandpaper roll that's as tough as performax brand.

    can someone reco a strong brand that is available and where I can purchase them online.

    Id rather not pay 24 dollars each roll.

    Ive got 2 more tables to build and a countertop possibly, I want to change out the belt in there now.
    Human Test Dummy

  2. #2
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    Allen,
    I have the Performax 22/44 Plus and that's about what I get with 80 grit on cutting boards, which are subsequently sanded with the ROS. I think you're going to have to put on a finer grit to reduce the lines. Maybe 120 grit would get you closer to the kind of finish you are looking for, but that means you will sacrifice some of the cutting power of the coarser grits. Not much help on the paper supply. I vaguely remember ordering my last rolls from Industrial Abrasives in PA, but can't be sure.

  3. #3
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    My experience is the same as Ted's, 80 grit is really coarse, and i suspect sanding those lines out is a lot of work. I only used 80 grit for the roughest of work, and generally used 120 or 150 (nothing finer), there were still lines, but they were not as hard to sand out. As for paper, my favorite was the bulk rolls Klingspor sells; an extremely long lived paper.

  4. #4
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    Without an oscillating drum, even finer grits like 320 leave lines so yes, this is normal. I get mine from Klingspor's Woodworking Shop and have not found a better value (price versus amount of use from the product). When you buy larger rolls you can get 14 wraps worth of paper for about $7 a wrap in 80 grit for your 22" sander. These cloth backed AO rolls come pre-marked for you to cut.

    Grits up to about 120 are for dimensioning so the machine is not expected to provide anything near a finished surface with those grits according to what I read from the abrasive makers. I tried to find an online version of their application chart but, no dice. For end grain cutting boards I go through 60, 80, 100, 120, 150 and 180 grits and then ROS them at 180 or 220 depending on material and how it behaves.

    For side grain boards I go on up to 220 or even higher depending again on material; you want the board to really soak up the oil but, present a pleasant initial surface. for furniture parts I always go at least to 220 on the drum and then scrape, plane or otherwise treat the surfaces. I imagine there are other quality abrasives the offer similar abrasive life but, so far I am happy with what and where I am buying.
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 12-12-2014 at 01:03 PM.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  5. #5
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    On my 16/32 I run 80 for the first couple passes then switch over to 150 to start removing the marks. I mean lets face it, 80 is nothing but like using rocks. After the 150 I go back to 120 on the orbit, then 150 then 180 or 220. I take a soft lead pencil and mark the piece up all over between each pass. When the pencil is gone, I switch grit until I reach my last grit.

    I really hoped the drum sander was the answer to end all sanding but it just ain't so. It speeds up the process for sure
    If you don't take pride in your work, life get's pretty boring.

    Rule of thumb is if you donít know what tool to buy next, then you probably donít need it yet.

  6. #6
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    I use the 100 grit 'blue' sanding strips on my 10/20. They give a good finish - that still needs sanding with the ROS - and last about four times as long as the paper-backed stuff.

    I got mine in a long roll from Woodworkers Supply. I think Klingspor has them, too. The blue Zirconia material is more expensive than the Alox, but it does last A LOT(!) longer.

    Allen, you mentioned taking light passes. That's really necessary with the wide belt Performaxes, and the higher (finer) the grit, the lighter each pass must be. Slowing the feed rate down helps a lot - for both sanding quality, and fewer 'stalls'.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  7. #7
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    Jim's source for A&H abrasives is a better price for the same cloth weight and same grit rolls. I may give them a try next order. Thanks Jim ;-) Also, I assume this does not hold true for cloth backed abrasives but, if mine get loaded up more than a rubber block type cleaner can handle, I just toss them in the sink, squirt them with some LA Awesome, let them set awhile and scrub them with a light wire brush. Hang them to dry and you're back in business.
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 12-12-2014 at 01:53 PM.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  8. #8
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    thanx, Im on it.

    my main use for the drum sander is furniture tops.
    Human Test Dummy

  9. #9
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    There was a discussion on the creek about using Abranet. I think I'll give it a try next time I need paper. It was recommended to use only the heavy duty Abranet, which only comes in 40-60-80 grit--so definately not for finish sanding.
    http://mirka-online.com/hd5bg001803r...80g-qty-1.html

    http://mirka-online.com/index.php/sp...net-rolls.html
    Last edited by Ted Calver; 12-12-2014 at 03:14 PM.

  10. #10
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    When I had a Performax sander, I did not get good results at 220 grit - too much burning and burnishing for the effort. I stopped at 150 or 180 and went to ROS.

    On my big (38" 5 hp) replacement, I only use 150.

    If you are using Abranet on a Festool ROS be sure to use an interface pad. Festool uses long hooks on the hook and loop, which go through the abranet and are sanded off.
    Charlie Plesums, Austin Texas
    (Retired early to become a custom furnituremaker)
    Lots of my free advice at www.solowoodworker.com

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