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Thread: Pine Tree Help

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Northville, MI
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    507

    Pine Tree Help

    I have this giant pine tree right next to my house that had finally overgrown it's welcome. Now twice the height of the house it started to overhang the roof. Are there any secrets to cutting down a pine? In my shop I generally don't like pine lumber because of the sap. Is this a case for borrowing someone elses saw so mine stays sapless? OK, just kidding on that last one.
    Jim

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Jim, even a little tree can really hurt a roof.

    I have no idea, and your post really does not say, but how much experience do you have dropping trees?

    I'm pretty good at it, can't hit the pop can like some of my friends back home, but I can get a tree to fall the way I want it, most of the time

    I'm just saying that if you do not have a lot of experience dropping trees, maybe it is time to hire someone to drop it for you, as I'm sure you can cut it up, the REAL work!!

    Just a thought.

    Only thing I know "different" about pine is that they can barber chair somewhat more that some hardwoods, but this really should not be a problem with the right cuts.

    Anything close to a house, you have to make sure where it is leaning, if it is leaning away from the house, in a direction you would like the tree to fall, lucky YOU!!

    Make a good wide notch, so once the tree starts it way down, it has enough energy to break the hinge, and continue it's fall..............

    If you know how to fell trees, I'm not telling you anything new, right

    Oh yeah, use two plastic wedges, just to be safe, you REALLY don't want that tree in your living room

    Good luck!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
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    I can drop the tree with confidence, it's the sap and gooey stuff I'm concerned with. I even hate cutting the limbs to make more room for my truck to get by.
    Jim

  4. #4
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    OK Jim, I see, I'm sorry I missunderstood.

    We used to cut loads of pine, I did not notice that much of a "sap" problem, but maybe the pine you are cutting is somehow different?

    How about waxing the heck out of your bar, with a good car wax or something to protect it, or at least make the sap easier to get rid of.........?

    Good luck!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Inside the Beltway
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    Jim,

    Pines aren't much worse than anything else, but they do go really fast. If you're used to hardwoods, you'll be surprised when it decides to go over....

    Thanks,

    Bill

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Michigan
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    I'd pay good money to see Paul Bunyan Young cut down a tree

    Take a video of the deed Paul.....err I mean Jim.
    A very wise man once said.......
    "I'll take my chances with Misseurs Smith and Wesson. "

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Northville, MI
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Ash View Post
    I'd pay good money to see Paul Bunyan Young cut down a tree
    DOn't let my office boy look fool you.
    Jim

  8. #8
    The sap should not be a problem. I've cut quite a bit of White Pine and Red Pine over the years and the sap does not come out of the wood really until after you saw the log into lumber. I am suspecting too that the sap has not completely come up from the roots yet so the tree might still be waking up form its dormancy. Of course that depends on where you live. Here, we are still snowmobiling!!

    If you are a clean freak like me and like to keep your saw clean and shiny, I found that washing and waxing the plastic keeps the saw from getting gummed up with sap. It sounds sissy like, but I take care of all my stuff and when I was logger, I especially took care of my chainsaw. Once a week I washed and waxed my saw and that was 15 years ago. The saw still runs and looks sharp to boot.

    Of course on here, if there are no pictures then it didn't happen so I will leave you with one. The first one is of a Basswood Tree however, and I am using a bulldozer instead of a skidder, but trust me I cut my share of pine too as can be seen in the next, but smaller, picture.



    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

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