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Thread: Veneer rookie

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
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    Exeter, CA
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    15

    Veneer rookie

    I've never used veneer. I've done a lot of refinishing, and finally am attempting to actually make my own projects. I just put up a 65" flat-screen on the wall and am going to build a floating Entertainment center. Nothing huge, just 54" long, 16" deep and 12" top to bottom. Anyway I discovered doing this out of solid wood isn't practical, so I'm going to attempt to use veneer. Anybody have any words of wisdom? Also what would be the best material to actually me this with that the veneer will adhere to best?

    If any of those questions are stupid, again, rookie

  2. #2
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    Dec 2006
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    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
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    If no solid wood, then that means either plywood or MDF. Plywood will be stronger, and quite a bit lighter than MDF. Either will take the veneer well.

    Since you're a veneering 'rookie,' I'd suggest visiting Joe Woodworker's website. There's a lot of good info there, as well as some very good buys on veneer.

    For a first project, you might want to consider using adhesive-backed veneer.

    I'm far from an expert on veneering, so hopefully someone who's better at it than me will chime in here soon.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    new york city burbs
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    or just use veneered plywood.
    Human Test Dummy

  4. #4
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    Nov 2012
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    Wapakoneta, OH
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    I'm also in the veneered plywood camp, unless your after one of the more exotic woods. You can get the veneered plywood in the common nominal thicknesses (1/2, 3/4, even 1/4" if you need it for the back) and it would be a lot easier than trying to roll your own.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    Thomasville, GA
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    Like the other guys said, I'd go veneered plywood if you can find it in the desired wood. If not, using peel-and-stick veneer is an option as Jim mentioned. Yet another option is to get paper-backed veneer in the desired wood and use the iron on method. I've done a ton of veneering by rolling PVA glue on both the paper backing of veneer and the substrate (usually plywood). Allow it to set up until it's mostly clear, then roll on another coat to the veneer backing. Let that set up a bit, then place the veneer on the substrate and run a regular clothing iron at a medium-high setting over the veneer to bond the two glue surfaces together. It's hard to give an exact time for the process; you'll get a feel for it if you practice on a small piece of scrap first.
    Bill Arnold
    Citizen of Texas residing in Georgia.
    NRA Life Member and Member of Mensa
    My Weather Underground station

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
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    St. Mary's, Georgia
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    I use wood on wood veneer but I make my own I use a vacuum press an do a lot at one time. With that been said I only need to use contact cement once I ready to make a project together,

    Here is some of my work with Veneer

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    Its not hard to do just a little bit time consuming but you can do a lot with raw veneer an just making your own panels, I use cherry for the backer on my veneer not paper or stickey back
    https://www.facebook.com/BgCouger

    If you are going to make something nice, make it with a statement, use quality an do it right the first time

  7. #7
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    Roy makes a good point about contact cement, but you have to consider where the finished item will be used. Inside a home, there shouldn't be any problem. The potential issue is heat or the combination of heat AND humidity. Contact cement is sensitive to heat and can soften enough to break the bond.
    Bill Arnold
    Citizen of Texas residing in Georgia.
    NRA Life Member and Member of Mensa
    My Weather Underground station

  8. #8
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    Aug 2014
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    St. Mary's, Georgia
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    Yap so true , that's why its best for inside furniture, I would not recommend any veneer use for outdoor use at all. I use cold press glue when I do wood on wood veneers for clients, an they use them on private airplanes an RVs , did some for private boat builders also
    https://www.facebook.com/BgCouger

    If you are going to make something nice, make it with a statement, use quality an do it right the first time

  9. #9
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    Delton, Michigan
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roy Millsaps View Post
    Yap so true , that's why its best for inside furniture, I would not recommend any veneer use for outdoor use at all. I use cold press glue when I do wood on wood veneers for clients, an they use them on private airplanes an RVs , did some for private boat builders also
    so if i understood you correctly, you are adding veneer to a solid piec of hard wood(cherry)? wont that warp badly from the veneer and glue like water on one side of plywood?
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
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  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
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    St. Mary's, Georgia
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    No the veneer of chose is glued to a cherry veneer backer 1/16" thick an then I can set it aside an use latter or I sell them to other companys an they use contact cement, I don't use paper as a backer as some companys do mine are wood on wood

    Click image for larger version. 

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    As you can see the ones in the picture are wood on wood veneers table tops I did for Gulf Stream they use contact cement an glue them to air craft aluminum tables an use solid wood for the sides
    https://www.facebook.com/BgCouger

    If you are going to make something nice, make it with a statement, use quality an do it right the first time

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