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Thread: Bodark Burl Bowl

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    Bodark Burl Bowl

    I turned this today while having a break in the monsoon season we seem to be having here. The burl was dry so I had to go real slow with it. Actually wasn't sure if I was going to complete it or not as there was another rain front on the way. Luck was with me. It's 9 1/2" in diameter, 2 1/2" high, and 1 3/4" deep. I sealed the wood as I always do with walnut oil. I have started trying that stuff out called OB's Shine Juice the other day. I found it to work real well with this wood. I did not have good results on softer woods like cedar and cottonwood. I guess it is not heavy enough to soak in as well as build up a finish. Or, I just goofed up with it. It has just enough shine to me to be nice looking but not shining like a bauble or something that would attract a raccoon. I burned a line into the outside just under the lip. I left enough of the natural edge to attract my rustic fans out there. Hope you like it.


    Create your own visual style... let it be unique for yourself and yet identifiable for others. Orson Welles

    Anytime spent learning something, no matter how trivial it seems, is not a waste of time.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Yorktown, Virginia
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    Nice looking bowl, Dave. That's some pretty good looking wood.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    Parker County, Texas
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    Thanks, Ted! I love turning bodark. It always presents challenges. Never a dull moment with it.
    Create your own visual style... let it be unique for yourself and yet identifiable for others. Orson Welles

    Anytime spent learning something, no matter how trivial it seems, is not a waste of time.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Mountain Home, Arkansas
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    I enjoy turning the wood of many names also. Usually I only use a wax or nothing to finish. Let us know how your oil works.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  5. #5
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    Oct 2006
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    ABQ NM
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    That's some pretty wood.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  6. #6
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    Mar 2015
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    Parker County, Texas
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    Thanks, guys! Frank, finishes are always a subject of debate that ends up being simply personal choice. The reason I do the walnut oil first is that it penetrates into the wood for better sealing and preservation. In my opinion. I generally turn and finish my bowls, chalices, etc., so they may be used. From trial and error I discovered not to use wax on chalices because the alcohol in wine and such dissolves the wax and you have a mad customer. It does not do that to walnut oil. Also, if someone puts steaming vegetables in a bowl finished with wax, the wax will most likely dissolve. Not good. Does not do that to walnut oil. If the bowl is a soft wood like cottonwood, I will seal it with walnut oil and then finish it with a 50/50 mixture of the walnut oil and shellac. It works well for all purposes. If it is a hard wood like bodark or pecan or mesquite, it gets sealed with the walnut oil and then finished with the OB's shine juice. The Shine Juice is just boiled linseed oil, shellac, and denatured alcohol in equal portions. The alcohol of course evaporates and helps with the even spreading of the other two. Seems to be worthwhile. Anyway, I have been using Mahoney's Walnut Finishing Oil for about 7 years I guess and love it. Good all round product.
    Create your own visual style... let it be unique for yourself and yet identifiable for others. Orson Welles

    Anytime spent learning something, no matter how trivial it seems, is not a waste of time.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    Oceanside, So. Calif. 5 mi. to the ocean
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    I had not heard of Bodark. However, it sure makes for a pretty bowl.

    Enjoy,
    JimB
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Clyce, Texas
    Posts
    187
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim C Bradley View Post
    I had not heard of Bodark. However, it sure makes for a pretty bowl.
    Perhaps you've heard of bois d'arc or Osage orange? Same thing.

  9. #9
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    Mar 2015
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    Parker County, Texas
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    Yep. I know of these names for it: Bois d Arc, Osage Orange, Horseapple, Hedgeapple, and I am sure there are others. On this side of the crick in Texas we call it bodark. Our shortened name for bois d arc. I honestly don't know if it is the hardest and most dense wood in the United States but if not, it has got to be a close second.
    Create your own visual style... let it be unique for yourself and yet identifiable for others. Orson Welles

    Anytime spent learning something, no matter how trivial it seems, is not a waste of time.

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