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Thread: Jim DeLaney it may just be all your fault

  1. #1
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    Jim DeLaney it may just be all your fault

    I sharpened the transitional smoother as you recommended Then I waxed the sole. The throat is a little more open than I am used to but it works great.

    IT SHOULD BE CALLED THE LITTLE SLICKER.

    With Johnson's past wax on the sole its slicker than snot on a porcelain door knob.
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
    "If it ain't round you may be a knuckle dragger""Turners drag their nuckles too, they just do it at a higher RPM"Bart

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bart Leetch View Post
    I sharpened the transitional smoother as you recommended Then I waxed the sole. The throat is a little more open than I am used to but it works great.

    IT SHOULD BE CALLED THE LITTLE SLICKER.

    With Johnson's past wax on the sole its slicker than snot on a porcelain door knob.
    Now, you inlet a small patch in the sole, to tighten the mouth to your liking, and you've really got a great plane.

    I've used ebony, Lignum Vitae, rosewood, cocobolo, and goncalo alves as patch material - pretty much whatever very hard wood I could find a scrap of - and they've all worked well. Some folks have used brass, but I've never tried that.

    Or, you could get really creative and make your own wood base. Oughtta be able to make one 'Krenov style' - laminated from three pieces - or just chisel out a replica of the original.

    The good part is that transitionals arene't all that expensive to aquire - especially the ones with bad wood under the hardware.

    Beware! The slope is about to get even slipperier!
    Jim D.

  3. #3
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    Re: Jim DeLaney it may just be all your fault

    Purty! Anything stamped on the front? Lever cap looks like it might be a Sargent 34??. You could figure out the model from the body length and/or the blade width. Very Nice...

  4. #4
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    Welcome Devin!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  5. #5
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    Devin "Purty! Anything stamped on the front? Lever cap looks like it might be a Sargent 34??."


    Nothing on the base but it has Fulton stamped on the blade.


    Jim "Now, you inlet a small patch in the sole, to tighten the mouth to your liking, and you've really got a great plane."

    I am not experienced enough that I'd want to try doing this.

    Maybe it would be better to try " making my own wood base. Oughtta be able to make one 'Krenov style' - laminated from three pieces - or just chisel out a replica of the original."

    "'Krenov style' - laminated from three pieces" this sound interesting.
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
    "If it ain't round you may be a knuckle dragger""Turners drag their nuckles too, they just do it at a higher RPM"Bart

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bart Leetch View Post
    ..."'Krenov style' - laminated from three pieces" this sound interesting.
    Four pieces actually, since you cut the center on in two. Take a piece of stock of the appropriate thickness and length, and two saw kerfs wider than the finished plane will be. BTW, for a tighter mouth, make the new block just a tad thicker than the original, then when you've reassembled it, you can carefully plane the sole to get a tight mouth.

    Slice off two pieces - one from each side - to be the 'cheeks' of the new plane.

    Cut the middle piece, at the appropriate place, at the proper angle - probably 45 in this case, since that's what the metal frog is set at.

    For the nose piece of the center, cut it at maybe 95 or so to allow for shaving clearance.

    Glue everything back together in the appropriate shape, install the metal, and you've got yourself a new plane.

    -------------------------------------------------

    Another way of doing it - using the original plane body - would be to laminate a whole new sole onto it. Just glue a maybe quarter inch thick piece of hard stuff onto the sole and then carefully cut a new mouth through the new sole.

    Have fun!
    Jim D.

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