Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: End Grain Wood Floors

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,008

    End Grain Wood Floors

    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Amherst, New Hampshire
    Posts
    10,600
    Maybe for a log cabin in the woods with log furniture. I think it looks too "busy" and actually kind of ugly.
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    No, not all of SoCal is Los Angeles!
    Posts
    9,076
    If you liked that look I would use an epoxy over it to assure a good seal. Like Sam Maloof's raw red brick floor; cool but potentially troublesome to live with ;-)
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,437
    Interesting, I guess in the right place, it would look good.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,698
    I'm a fan of the theory of end grain wood floors, their implementation not so much. Traditionally end grain floors were popular in high traffic and wear applications like barns and machine shops, there are even a few surviving examples of them used for road surfacing. In those cases the pieces would have been cut out split to fit and wedged in quite tightly. It was also common to split out the pith.

    There was a very nice example of this in an old cabin up river from my grandparents ranch, but some vandal tore it up and burned it in the late 80s. That was my first exposure and I've been somewhat fascinated with the idea even since.

    http://www.pa.msu.edu/services/machi.../shopfloor.htm

    http://kaswell.com/gallery/ has a bunch of nicer (IMHO) pictures of installations.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    1,448
    It looks like a lot of work, for something that may reduce rather than enhance the value of the home. Look closely where the sun shines, and see how uneven the floor really is.





    Note also the fine kitchen cabinets in the background of the second picture.
    Charlie Plesums, Austin Texas
    (Retired early to become a custom furnituremaker)
    Lots of my free advice at www.solowoodworker.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    DSM, IA
    Posts
    5,719
    Have a friend that did something similar in the kitchen with cutoffs from several barn beams. The beams being rectangle helped to make it more look like a tile floor and a jig made all the cutoffs the same thickness. I think their's looks good...this one is a little random for me but to each there own! You thinking of doing something similar with your kitchen remodel Vaughn?
    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. -Henry David Thoreau
    My Website


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,008
    Nah Jeff, not planning on using this. I saw a number of people on Facebook who loved it, but none of them were woodworkers. Figured I'd post it here just to see if I was the only woodworker who wasn't wowed by the idea.

    My feelings were similar to what the rest of you have been saying. I don't mind the look, but it looks like a maintenance problem waiting to happen. I see the unevenness that Charlie pointed out. Also, seasonal movement of the wood would potentially cause grout failure, and the poly finish wouldn't stay crystal clear for long.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,698
    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    Also, seasonal movement of the wood would potentially cause grout failure, and the poly finish wouldn't stay crystal clear for long.
    For machine shop floors they were often pretty heavily oiled (not always intentionally) to help with the seasonal movement issue. However if they got wet (roof leak, etc..) the expansion was reportedly rather dramatic. I guess I'd like to see it once in my life - on someone elses floor

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Coastal plain of North Carolina
    Posts
    564
    I have never seen an end grain floor done with rounds cut from tree limbs etc. but I did see a floor in a machine shop surfaced with squares cut from 4X4's. It had been in use many years and was almost unrecognizable until you looked closely because of all the grit, grime and oil soaked into the surface.

    I have no idea how it was secured to the concrete beneath it. The gentleman who owned the business said the floor was like that when he bought the building and he thinks it is more than 100 years old. Seems like a hard way to get a floor.
    I may be getting a little older physically but mentally I'm still tarp as a shack.

Similar Threads

  1. Filling in End wood grain
    By Al Launier in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 02-25-2014, 10:57 PM
  2. Types of Shop Wood Floors
    By Cynthia White in forum Shop Tours
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 03-14-2011, 02:50 AM
  3. Nice grain bad wood
    By Dan Mosley in forum Turning Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 11-15-2010, 05:35 AM
  4. Paste Wood Grain Filler
    By Michael Bischof in forum Finishing School
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 12-29-2009, 10:31 PM
  5. Par-ky (wood tiled) floors
    By Stuart Hanford in forum Carpentry and Construction
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 05-27-2007, 12:20 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •