Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Pine bowl

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,746

    Pine bowl

    This is the bowl I told you about yesterday. It is about 8" in diameter, and 1.6" deep.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCF6503.JPG 
Views:	35 
Size:	118.2 KB 
ID:	90807Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCF6504.JPG 
Views:	33 
Size:	119.7 KB 
ID:	90808Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCF6505.JPG 
Views:	34 
Size:	111.5 KB 
ID:	90809
    Cheers,
    Roger


    The other member of Mensa, but not the NRA

    Everyone is a self-made person.

    "The thing about quotes on the internet is that you cannot confirm their veracity" -Abraham Lincoln

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,746
    I submitted this in a hurry as my computer has been shutting down without warning. I may have to send it to the big computer room in the sky. The bowl is kiln dried pine with a couple of coates of Minwax finishing wax. You'll get tired of looking at these soon. I inted to get a lot of practice!
    Cheers,
    Roger


    The other member of Mensa, but not the NRA

    Everyone is a self-made person.

    "The thing about quotes on the internet is that you cannot confirm their veracity" -Abraham Lincoln

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,746
    The black marks in some of the grain go right through to the other side. I thought they were just dirt, but I guess they're natural.
    Cheers,
    Roger


    The other member of Mensa, but not the NRA

    Everyone is a self-made person.

    "The thing about quotes on the internet is that you cannot confirm their veracity" -Abraham Lincoln

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,008
    Nicely done, Roger. Pine (especially dried pine) is a tough wood cut cleanly. (That's why you had some spots of tearout.) I also see a few marks on the inside that indicate the wood was bruised by the heel of the gouge, but things like that will improve with practice. You're off to a great start!
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,698
    Yeah that's pretty nice for pine, its a real pain to get a decent cut on (I know folks do it and my hat is off to them!).

    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    I also see a few marks on the inside that indicate the wood was bruised by the heel of the gouge, but things like that will improve with practice. You're off to a great start!
    I get those, the 80 grit gouge sometimes helps a little there

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Parker County, Texas
    Posts
    1,491
    I'm glad to see someone get something good from pine. I never had any luck with it. It might be the species of pine I got a hold of as well. It's some kind called afghan pine. Really bad wood for turning. Literally falls apart on you. Oh, well. Good going, Roger!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,746
    This is white pine, kiln dried. I've heard Afghan pine can just explode off the lathe without warning.
    Cheers,
    Roger


    The other member of Mensa, but not the NRA

    Everyone is a self-made person.

    "The thing about quotes on the internet is that you cannot confirm their veracity" -Abraham Lincoln

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,746
    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    Nicely done, Roger. Pine (especially dried pine) is a tough wood cut cleanly. (That's why you had some spots of tearout.) I also see a few marks on the inside that indicate the wood was bruised by the heel of the gouge, but things like that will improve with practice. You're off to a great start!
    If I put a secondaty bevel on the back of the gouge, would that help? I can do that easily.
    Cheers,
    Roger


    The other member of Mensa, but not the NRA

    Everyone is a self-made person.

    "The thing about quotes on the internet is that you cannot confirm their veracity" -Abraham Lincoln

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,698
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Tulk View Post
    If I put a secondaty bevel on the back of the gouge, would that help? I can do that easily.
    Helps for me, I actually use a weird grind because ain't no one smacked me around to make me know better... but it basically has almost no heal. The bevel you ride only needs to be a small fraction of an inch long for it to work, the rest is (imho) mostly in the way.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,008
    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Mooney View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Tulk View Post
    If I put a secondaty bevel on the back of the gouge, would that help? I can do that easily.
    Helps for me, I actually use a weird grind because ain't no one smacked me around to make me know better... but it basically has almost no heal. The bevel you ride only needs to be a small fraction of an inch long for it to work, the rest is (imho) mostly in the way.
    Yeppers, the secondary bevel can prevent the bruising. Instead of just a single, second bevel, I kind of round off the heel by putting a whole bunch of beveled grinds on it.

    And ditto what Ryan said about the 80 grit gouge. Sandpaper is just another tool in the box, in my opinion. That said, sometimes the bruise can be tough to sand out. And it also took me a long time to learn (the stubborn way) that using a lot of pressure on the sandpaper doesn't really help. Instead, it heats up the wood and can sort of case harden it, making it that much harder to get rid of the blemishes.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

Similar Threads

  1. First Pine
    By Tom Wallace in forum Finishing School
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-22-2015, 07:52 PM
  2. Ponderosa Pine bowl
    By Curt Fuller in forum Lathe Project Showcase
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 12-17-2009, 05:44 PM
  3. matching salvaged pine flooring to existing pumpkin pine floor
    By Robert Gilmore in forum Finishing School
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 02-23-2008, 09:45 AM
  4. A Little Pine Box
    By Kerry Burton in forum Lathe Project Showcase
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 11-10-2007, 10:56 PM
  5. A Pine Box
    By Robert Schaubhut in forum Flatwork Project Showcase
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 06-03-2007, 03:45 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •