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Thread: Round Kitchen Table...is this design even possible?

  1. #1
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    Question Round Kitchen Table...is this design even possible?

    Hello all, long-time reader, first time poster....
    The LOML has found a picture of a table she would like from Restoration Hardware, and asked if I could build it. After I really started to think about it, I came to realize that this table doesn't seem to allow for wood movement at all...and I would imagine would crack and expand like there is no tomorrow.
    Here is the pic of what she wants....Is this even realistic? (1st time posting...hoping the pics work here...if not, I'll post again with the links.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    https://www.restorationhardware.com/...ryId=cat160047

    A search online found "plans" from someone who has built it, and those looked very easy, but...there was NO allowance for movement (pocket holes and glue all around: http://ana-white.com/2014/12/DIY_fur...l-dining-table)
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Love the look, but I'm trying to figure out a good way to build it.
    I think if we wanted the border (which looks very nice), then maybe I could do the center portion out of MDF topped with an oak faced plywood (cut into strips to resemble boards with the differing grain directions), and using 4/4 or even 8/4 oak for the border pieces. I think that would mean no wood movement in the center, and the border could expand as needed (would those joints "stay", or is the border a bad idea all around????)

    If we could do without the border, I thought about using "real" lumber for the center, with the X portion being mortised, and the "triangles" having tenons cut into the ends of them to fitup with the x, and allow for seasonal expansion radially out from the center, then just rounding the edges instead of installing any type of border.

    So...what are the experts thoughts? Would either of the methods give me a table that would stand up to years of seasonal expansion and contraction?
    Thanks for reading this, and thanks in advance for any thoughts or advice!
    Doug

  2. #2
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    You could make the inner sections of the top of veneered MDF if you want but the Restoration Hardware table looks like it is designed with the expectation that the seams between the parts of the top will open and close as needed. The table is pretty rustic so those gaps would sort of add to that feel.
    Irony: The opposite of Wrinkly

  3. #3
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    I agree with Dave. I think the original was designed to move, and any slight gaps would just be part of the nature of the piece. Keep in mind, I'm not really a furniture maker, but if I was building it, I'd make the four "triangle" sections out of tongue and groove panels floating within the frame of the border/center cross. The trickiest part would be building the outer border/frame as an octagon and then cutting a clean, perfect circle out of it. The frame parts could be joined a number of ways...mortise and tenon, floating tenon, dowels, pocket screws all come to mind.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    I agree with Dave. I think the original was designed to move, and any slight gaps would just be part of the nature of the piece. Keep in mind, I'm not really a furniture maker, but if I was building it, I'd make the four "triangle" sections out of tongue and groove panels floating within the frame of the border/center cross. The trickiest part would be building the outer border/frame as an octagon and then cutting a clean, perfect circle out of it. The frame parts could be joined a number of ways...mortise and tenon, floating tenon, dowels, pocket screws all come to mind.
    Vaughn hit it. That's exactly how I'd make it.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  5. #5
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    Thanks Dave and Vaughn (and Jim of course). I think when I first saw the picture, I was thinking, nice design, but I want a flat table-top...with no crumb-catchers built in. Sounds like you guys are in agreement that the grooves/gaps are just going to be there...and we either live with them or find another design.
    I'll have to run it past the boss and see what she thinks about the gaps.

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