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Thread: How'd I do?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    Posts
    1,103

    How'd I do?

    Hi friends,

    I just picked up a neat little lathe from Craigslist here in Honolulu. It's an older Taiwan made 6" variable speed machine but it's in real decent shape. The seller couldn't find the tailstock but they're still looking. It did come with a bunch of stuff though,
    like:
    the lathe as shown in the ad,


    the lathe as I received it today,


    some of the things that came with it,
    2 - 3" universal chucks (both new) & a set of tools made by Crown Tools of Sheffield, England,


    and,
    a 2" x 8" pneumatic sanding drum and 15 new sleeves,


    and,
    more than 10 pen kits & some blanks,


    I tried a small piece to see if I remembered how,


    Umm, I only paid $75.00 for it, before I even knew it came with all the extra stuff.

    So, How'd I do?

    Aloha, Tony
    "You got to learn from the mistakes of others. You won't live long enough to make them all yourself". (Author unknown)

    "Time flies like..... an arrow,,,Fruit flies like..... a banana." Groucho Marx

    Ah,,,to live in Paradise!

    Registered voting member

    Fighting for all I am worth, and praying every day.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    29,080
    I'd say you did pretty good there, Tony. Looks like you also turned the requisite bonker. I think you're already slipping into the Abyss.

    If the seller is unable to find the tailstock, you might be able to get one from Penn State Industries. They still sell that lathe. (For $269.95. Yeah, you did alright.) The tailstock may cost about as much as you paid for the lateh, but you'll still be money ahead.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    Posts
    1,103

    How'd I do?

    Hi Vaughn,

    I'm happy with it. I saw the PSI sticker (right below the Carba-Tec decal) on it so I figured to check them out for parts if needed. That particular model is not listed on their website, but a newer version is.

    I have one question about the speed controller on this. The motor is 110 volt DC with a potentiometer (sic). It is fairly steady in speed increases as you turn the knob, but sometimes speeds up then levels down a bit. Also, at any particular speed setting the motor will speed up considerably when a load is placed on it, as when you sand the piece turning. Is this a normal charactistic for small variable speed drives? I'm entirely new at these and will be asking questions.

    Thanks for your reply. I was really surprised when the lady I got it from (It was her father's) showed me all the stuff that came with the deal. I would have been content with just the lathe, but those two new chucks, and the sanding drum, well, that was the icing on the cake. I'm going to make something on the lathe and give it to her in appreciation of that good deal. I can even practice on some pens without having to worry about spoiling one or two learning. This is going to be fun, I can see real fast.

    Aloha, Tony
    "You got to learn from the mistakes of others. You won't live long enough to make them all yourself". (Author unknown)

    "Time flies like..... an arrow,,,Fruit flies like..... a banana." Groucho Marx

    Ah,,,to live in Paradise!

    Registered voting member

    Fighting for all I am worth, and praying every day.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    29,080
    Tony, I have a little Wilton mini-lathe that's similar (but a bit lighter-duty). The speed controller is very similar. (For all I know, they're all coming out of the same factory.) I haven't seen mine speed up when a load is put on it, although sometimes I can hear the motor straining a bit harder. I do see a bit of "settling down" when I change the speeds, but not a considerable amount.

    You might have a bit of dirt and grime inside the potentiometer. One old trick I use on electric guitars with dirty pots is to "exercise" the knob briskly for 30 seconds or so. Just crank it back and forth from one end of its range to the next for a bit. This will often loosen up the gunk and get things working more smoothly.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Taree Australia
    Posts
    37
    G'Day Tony

    Boy you did good, that's some haul.

    Cheers
    Bernie

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,697
    Even without the tailstock, or lathe for that matter, you did alright just on the chucks alone.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Goodland, Kansas
    Posts
    4,834
    Ya did good Tony. With all the extra's you probably got at least 3 times what you paid. Like Frank said you got your money's worth just in the chucks. Turning looks good. Keep'em coming.
    Bernie W.

    Retirement: Thats when you return from work one day
    and say, Hi, Honey, Im home forever.

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    Posts
    1,103

    How'd I do

    Hi all,

    Thanks for the good ratings. I'm just getting into turning and have a lot to re-learn. It's been over 50 years since I was on a wood lathe. (High school)

    I've also got an old Craftsman, all apart, in storage, to be restored someday. I don't have any space for anything bigger than this mini now. I think it's going to work good for me. I like how smooth this lathe runs. Feels well balanced and built pretty well.

    It's a Carba-Tec, model HM-1V. Anyone else have any experience with one? There is a sticker from the original dealer, PSI, and I have checked their website. Like Vaughn said, they still sell one that is just like it, so it can't be all bad. I was thinking of fabricating a tailstock if I can't find one. I'll check with PSI to see what a replacement will set me back. Most of my experience has been in metal work anyway.

    More on this later, as I get time to work with it.

    Aloha, Tony
    "You got to learn from the mistakes of others. You won't live long enough to make them all yourself". (Author unknown)

    "Time flies like..... an arrow,,,Fruit flies like..... a banana." Groucho Marx

    Ah,,,to live in Paradise!

    Registered voting member

    Fighting for all I am worth, and praying every day.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,582
    Hey Tony, welcome to the abyss!!

    Careful with them chucks, they sure look like knuckle busters!!

    You done good, $75.......man, what a deal!!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  10. #10
    Welcome to the Abyss Tony! I'd say you got a good buy.

    One thing you might try is as Vaughn suggested.

    Another suggestion is to turn the lathe on and use the handle of a screwdriver or even a piece of wood and tap near the brush holders on the motor and see if it causes the speeds to change. I've seen dc motors where the brushes get worn and thus too short. They then make a poor/intermittant contact with the armature of the motor. If the speed changes with the tapping I'd remove the brushes and compare their length.

    Even if you have to do some repair I think you got a good buy!

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