Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19

Thread: New to carving

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    14

    New to carving

    Hello All,
    First off I would like to say thank you to Lora Irish. I just decided to get into wood carving about three weeks and have been scouring the Internet for credible information on the subject and how to begin. This search led me to Lora's webpage and gave me a starting point. After reading the information on her page I purchased a starter set of Flexcut tools, went to Michael's where I purchased two pieces of basswood and began carving. The first two carvings (pics included below) were from Lora's patterns and enjoyed it thoroughly. Which once again led me to Lora's webpage and ultimately here to Family Woodworking looking for the next project.

    I am very excited to have found this community of impassioned woodcarvers and I apologize now for all of my newbie questions. I have been reading through past threads where I have found a plethora of projects to continue to feed my new addiction. As such I have ordered a grab box of basswood from Rockler's and cannot wait to start carving. Maybe wooden pliers or a spirit face. Any suggestion would be appreciated.

    Now for my first question... Sorry I'm not an artist and this is probably art school 101.
    My first carving was the flower. During this carving my goal was to, 1) learn how to use my new tools, 2) carve a low relief and 3) give the appearance that the flower is raised from the board. Would simply undercutting each pedal and not removing background material give the appropriate shadows to give the 3D illusion? Is it the shadows that give the impression of depth?

    The second attempt at carving was the barn and silo pattern that was also on Lora’s page. During this carving I learned a few things. Always go with the grain and take a little at a time. This was learned during roughing or should I say splitting out the silo, which consequently sits back a little lower than originally planned.

    Wow...just realized how long my rant has taken my first thread so I will stop now. Once again thank you Lora for the great resource and to the group for all the future input.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2572.jpg 
Views:	42 
Size:	63.4 KB 
ID:	91226Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2575.jpg 
Views:	42 
Size:	64.8 KB 
ID:	91227

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Yorktown, Virginia
    Posts
    5,016
    Welcome to the family, Dennis! It might take a while to get an answer to your question because some of us are recuperating from our annual gathering. You might consider adding your location to your profile, just in case there is someone nearby that can help. Glad you found us.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Catalunya
    Posts
    4,632
    Hi Dennis.
    Welcome to the family!

    Looking a your first pieces I would say that they are a very good start, and to answer your questions: Yes, undercutting is what gives you stronger shadows and makes the relief pop out from the background, on yours what I would do is to eliminate those strong gouge marks of the background as they take the attention away from the flower. You don't need to carve away all the background wood, but it would look better if you could shape the rebate in a shape of an ellipse for instance, and subdue those gouge marks as I said.

    There is no need of going always with the grain, in fact most of the time one goes across the grain. Baswood is great for carving but tiny or thin details tend to break or split easily, and each one of them has to be worked accordingly with or across the grain.
    Best regards,
    Toni

    __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ _________________
    web site:http://www.toniciuraneta.com
    I also dream of a shop with north light where my hands can be busy, my soul rest and my mind wander...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    14
    Ted - Location has been updated and thank you for the advice.

    Toni - Thank you for answering my question. I see what you mean about the gouge marks. When I get back to the workbench I will smooth out the gouge marks and give the rebate an elliptical shape.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,699
    Howdy Dennis,

    Excellent start on those pieces, the barn/silo is imho really well done!

    I think Toni has you covered on the questions on the current carvings The cross grain thing was an epiphany for me when I finally figured it out, vastly easier to get an accurate cut.

    As far as what, play around and see what you like I might suggest trying some pieces with more dimensions (sprite or similar) or maybe try a bit of chip carving, or just keep rocking the reliefs!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    14
    Ryan - Thanks for the feedback it is appreciated.

    How do you all suggest removing pencil lines from the wood after carving? I assume that after fine details are applied you would not want to run back over with sand paper. I tried the pink eraser on the end of the pencil which proceeded to do a nice job smearing the pencil marks around and making a nice mess of things.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
    Posts
    12,258
    Welcome Dennis. Fellow rookie carver here that is also addicted.

    I have just had some one on one tutoring with Toni (if you want to see some work of his to get an idea of his credentials take a look at Toni's website link on his signature) and one process i experienced that has significant value to me is practicing cuts using your gouges. Learning to make good quality stop cuts. Not implying you don't know this just sharing what i learn't and will subsequently be practicing.

    Not in a position to show a pic right now but will return with one later.

    Btw just as a point of order...for this forum since inception you do not need to apologize for your questions. The guys that hang out here are usually more than willing to share what they know or even try direct u in the right direction if they don't so ask away.

    Sent from my SGH-I337M using Tapatalk
    cheers

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Escondido, CA
    Posts
    5,172
    White erasers from the art department will do a much better job. Or a sharp scraper and a light touch.
    ++++++

    Some say the land of milk and honey; others say the land of fruits and nuts. All together my sort of heaven.

    Power is not taken. It is given. Who have you given yours to? Hmmmm?

    Carol Reed

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,699
    Quote Originally Posted by Carol Reed View Post
    White erasers from the art department will do a much better job. Or a sharp scraper and a light touch.
    That's about what i do as well, although I prefer to avoid the eraser if at all possible and carve or (less so) scrape away the lines instead.

    Side question for Dennis, you seem to have a pretty good handle on the art part (perspective and drawing) so I was wondering if you'd had much prior art experience and if so what kind. Actually being able to draw things out is a huge advantage from what I've seen and something I'm just not really good at (actually find out easier to work on wood, but end up having to be pretty conservative on my cuts compared to someone with a better view of what they're shooting for).

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Yorktown, Virginia
    Posts
    5,016
    I usually use the white eraser, but somewhere I read that denatured alcohol (DNA) would remove pencil lines. When I made some inserts for my daughters jewelry box I tried DNA on a Q-tip to remove lines from some Spanish cedar and it worked OK. Don't know if it would work on a light colored wood like basswood, but if you try it please let us know how it does.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-28-2015, 05:41 PM
  2. My first 3D carving on the CNC
    By Jason Beam in forum Flatwork Project Showcase
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 04-30-2013, 12:01 AM
  3. carving
    By Dave Hawksford in forum Carpentry and Construction
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 09-25-2009, 01:34 PM
  4. Some Notes on Carving Tools for "Carving for Turning"
    By Mike Henderson in forum Lathe Project Showcase
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 05-02-2008, 07:29 PM
  5. First Carving!
    By Ed Nelson in forum Flatwork Project Showcase
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 10-01-2007, 05:39 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •