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Thread: Mitering Trim issue

  1. #1

    Mitering Trim issue

    I am new to the forum, but so far I have not been able to find a specific answer to my dilemma.

    As a hobbyist/craft-maker, I often need to "frame" my work. I have managed to work with mitering wood that lies flat (like a picture frame), and sideways (like a nickle standing on edge)... but cannot figure out how to miter "Corner Guard" (L-shaped) molding. If I miter the "top" to fit together - the "sides" are whacked. What is the secret trick?

    My son says it has to be treated as if 2 individual pieces and adjust accordingly. He says run the 45=degree cut along the "top" (in to out, or out to in) and reset the saw and run a 2nd cut for the "sides" (back to front, or front to back). I understand his premise -- but it is counter intuitive to everything I know about people who are woodworkers/construction. Their motto is a one-pass rip (to save time).

    Can it be my son's proposal is the correct answer? Or is there another/better way? Please help - I'm running out of wood.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Hi, Nancy! Welcome to the Family.

    It would be helpful if you take a photo of the corner guard you're using and the angle you want to join it together. I can picture a few ways to utilize the product for a frame. We need to see your intent.
    Bill Arnold
    Citizen of Texas residing in Georgia.
    NRA Life Member and Member of Mensa
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  3. #3
    Join Date
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    I'm thinking you refer to stuff like what is put on the outside corners of walls to keep them from chipping (?). If true, that can be mitered in one pass. But I had best wait for you to confirm this is the style/

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Welcome aboard, Nancy. Is there any chance you could post photos to illustrate the problem? Also, are you certain your saw is cutting EXACTLY 45 degrees? Being just a tiny bit off can really throw a miter cut off.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Welcome aboard, Nancy. Pardon the pun.

    If I am interpreting correctly, Corner Guard is two legs at right angles to each other. I'd mark on leg as a reference face for each piece. That reference face goes down on the saw table. Now think of it as rectangular piece of wood and mitre away. As long as the reference faces are always on the same plane as you assembly it, you are golden.

    As a hint, use green or blue masking tape and put a piece on the inside face of the angle leg. That way you can see it when it is on the saw and will know instantly if you have placed it on the saw incorrectly. Leave it on until you have finished the assembly. Hope that helps.
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  6. #6
    Join Date
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    I believe the same technique as is used with cove molding will come into play. Either a compound miter cut or a jig to position the material in its "finished" orientation so a regular mite cut can be used.

    https://www.kregtool.com/store/c47/s...rown-protrade/
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  7. #7
    YES~!!
    This is exactly the trim I am referring to. I am 2/3 of the way through making a floor lamp that sits on a piece of tile that needs to be able to withstand the weight without toppling over. What I am trying to do is have this L-Shaped trim so that one side (what I call the top) butts up to the edge of the tile base, and the other portion of the L-Shaped trim (what I call the sides) hang down. The goal being that the tile will be perfectly "framed" with sides that hang down -- that also perfectly meet. I would then flip the tile over, and either: a) attached to a solid piece of 3/4" or 1 [plywood; or b) pour concrete so it can provide the proper weight needed. Either way --- the wood or cement will be hidden by the L-Shaped Corner Guard.

    Make sense?

  8. #8
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    I think I understand what you are doing. Let me ask, if you lay the molding into the miter saw (or miter box, whichever)with the "top" down and the "side" against the fence, does that not cut the 45 degree angle like you want?

  9. #9
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    Ah, so the 90 degree portion of the molding is going to be parallel and perpendicular to the floor? I did not get that. If I am seeing it correctly now, I would lay the molding over a carrier board (exaggerated here for clarity) and use a miter gauge on the tablesaw, RAS or CMS to get the 45 degree cut.

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    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
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  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by fred hargis View Post
    I think I understand what you are doing. Let me ask, if you lay the molding into the miter saw (or miter box, whichever)with the "top" down and the "side" against the fence, does that not cut the 45 degree angle like you want?
    ------------------------------------
    Ok - thanks to everyone that responded..... I finally figured it out and was able to miter a test piece that fits exactly what I need. It's a matter of flipping the wood the right way. I'll still have to do a few more trial tests to get the preciseness I need -- but I feel alot better seeing that it does work (and in 1 pass~!) Can't wait to point that out to my know-it-all son. **Bonus Points**

    I was almost at my tolerance point and ready to just slap a single edge flat piece to cover the sides. Not my 1st choice, but certainly would work. Glad that I don't have to compromise my original design and I can go forward with confidence using the L-shape trim I had envisioned.

    Thanks so much~!
    Thank you~!

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