Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 26

Thread: Hollows and Rounds Class @ Port Townsend

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Bellingham
    Posts
    2,449

    Hollows and Rounds Class @ Port Townsend

    I have not significantly posted in a long time. The most I have done is provide an occasional sound bite. I have been busy working longer days; about 12 hours a day when you consider the travel time. It does not leave much time in the evening to do any woodworking. I have accomplished a few projects in this time-frame, but it has been hard to get any enthusiasm to post about them. They were mostly just stuff on the “honey do” list, not “fine furniture”.

    I also have not taken any woodworking classes lately. It has been a couple of years and quite frankly there was not a lot more that I felt I needed to learn. The one except is the making of my own molding planes. It is something I wanted to do for a while. Well, I actually didn’t want to make my own, it is just the difficulty of acquiring decent used ones and the price and delivery time of new ones, kind of forced my hand. But as I learned today, it is a skill that will help me in tuning up any more vintage ones that I should get. I was told today the reason why most molding planes don't work well is that they have lost their "mating" with the bed or that the iron profile no longer matches the plane profile. The skill required for making new planes is directly usable to fixing old planes.

    I missed out when Matt Bickford was here in Port Townsend last time, so when I saw that the Port Townsend School of Woodworking was bringing him back this year, I signed up early.

    So this thread will be about my class that I am taking this week. Actually it is two classes: the making of hollow and rounds and the use of these planes to make moldings. It won’t be a detailed blow by blow of what is taking place in the class. It is not possible as you are just too busy soaking everything up and trying to keep up with the pace of the class. It will be just some photos and text on the highlights of my adventure and not necessarily just about the woodworking.

    I hope you find it interesting and I also hope it makes up for me not posting much.
    “When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece.” - John Ruskin
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.” - Oscar Wilde

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,698


    Well, you're back in a big way! I've thought about these but they look pretty intimidating!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Bellingham
    Posts
    2,449
    Some of you may remember the traveling tool box I made some time ago (4 to 6 years?). Well, since I made my large floor tool box and stopped taking any classes, it has been sitting up in my shop’s attic. I was going to toss it, but decided I might still need it. It was looking pretty bad and was never really a thing of beauty because of the crummy wood I used. Here is picture that I took of the box when I was at one of classes that was taught by Chris Schwarz.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Schwarz 027.jpg 
Views:	27 
Size:	42.3 KB 
ID:	91570
    OK, it does not look too bad there but trust me it did not age beautifully.

    I have a time honored tradition that when I take classes at Port Townsend, to wait until the last few days before we leave, and then decide to make something that I think I need for the class. How do you think the original traveling toolbox came to be? So I work like a wild man day and night to pull off something that I should have started a month before.

    So in keeping with tradition I decide a few days before we are to leave for Port Townsend to refurbish the old traveling tool box. Maybe a little cleaning and some paint. Shouldn’t take long at all. Yeah, right.

    I totally disassembled the box, except for the dovetail joints. I then planed and sanded all the parts, shellacking the interiors. I then re-nailed all the panels using Tremont cut finishing nails I had. The back pine boards had a nice patina to them, so I did nothing but clean them and apply wax. I then poured over paint samples finally settling on a nice blue. I worked like a dog on a bone, but managed to complete the refurbished box and get packed with the tools I needed and few I didn’t by 5:00 PM Saturday. We were leaving early the next morning. I must be getting better at this late minute stuff.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0675.jpg 
Views:	25 
Size:	46.7 KB 
ID:	91571Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0676.jpg 
Views:	25 
Size:	49.2 KB 
ID:	91572Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0680.jpg 
Views:	26 
Size:	57.7 KB 
ID:	91573Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0687.jpg 
Views:	24 
Size:	55.9 KB 
ID:	91574Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0685.jpg 
Views:	24 
Size:	78.4 KB 
ID:	91579

    I have to say it did not turn out too bad.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0689.jpg 
Views:	25 
Size:	43.0 KB 
ID:	91575Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0690.jpg 
Views:	25 
Size:	44.7 KB 
ID:	91576Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0692.jpg 
Views:	27 
Size:	56.2 KB 
ID:	91577Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0693.jpg 
Views:	31 
Size:	45.8 KB 
ID:	91578
    “When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece.” - John Ruskin
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.” - Oscar Wilde

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Bellingham
    Posts
    2,449
    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Mooney View Post
    I've thought about these but they look pretty intimidating!
    I thought the same thing, Ryan and they still are. So far it is going well and I will post on that tomorrow. I am bushed and about ready to turn in. One thing I have learned is that these classes wear you out, because how much concentration you put into the entire day.
    “When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece.” - John Ruskin
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.” - Oscar Wilde

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Yorktown, Virginia
    Posts
    5,002
    That's a sweet looking travel companion. Beats the heck out of my Costco banana box.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,002
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Satko View Post
    ...managed to complete the refurbished box ...by 5:00 PM Saturday...
    That's not nearly close enough. Anything before midnight doesn't even count as being "close".

    The refurbed box looks great, Bill. Looking forward to you posts about the class.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Bellingham
    Posts
    2,449
    The advantage of taking classes at the Port Townsend School of Woodworking over other schools is the surroundings. Port Townsend is an old (West coast old) seaport that was established in about 1850. Because it is located on the Northeast tip of the Olympic Peninsula, across the sound from the major cities of Washington, it has avoided the growth that follows the Interstate 5 corridor. In short, it has a much slower pace of life and has attracted people looking for a different lifestyle. A lot of those people tend to lean toward crafts, so you have a very strong community of people that are woodworkers, shipbuilders, pottery makers, etc.

    The school is located at the defunct Fort Worden which is now a state park. It is in itself an interesting place, which today is being revitalized by the state by utilizing its facilities in leasing out the buildings to colleges and nonprofits like the woodworking school.

    I wanted to get this post out before I headed out to walk to class. I shot some pictures of my walk from where we stay (secret spot that we do not share with others) along the beach to the Fort where school is. Here is link to pictures of an early class that shows more detail of my daily walk. These are just highlights of yesterdays, which I thought interesting. Tonight I will get into the details of the class.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0715.jpg 
Views:	25 
Size:	65.4 KB 
ID:	91581Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0713.jpg 
Views:	25 
Size:	79.5 KB 
ID:	91580Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0717.jpg 
Views:	23 
Size:	45.2 KB 
ID:	91582Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0718.jpg 
Views:	25 
Size:	59.1 KB 
ID:	91583
    “When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece.” - John Ruskin
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.” - Oscar Wilde

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Bellingham
    Posts
    2,449
    Sorry, last night "work" reached out to me and I had to do something for them. Kind of used up my evening.

    Ryan had the thought that the class might be a little intimidating and after two days of class, I would say that his assessment was not far off. It has been the most challenging class so far for me. The main reason is that it you are using techniques that have a lot of little nuances that trail and error can only teach you. Specifically I am talking about using floats to open up the unique mortise in a hollow and round. If you remove wood in the wrong place, you can't put it back!

    Let me step back. Matt had already prepared a set of blanks for each of us. Actually 3 blanks, as one was a practice blank. When I say prepared, I mean he had already cut out the escapement, drilled the holes (that define the mortise edges) and generally rough shaped it.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0734.jpg 
Views:	19 
Size:	58.7 KB 
ID:	91602

    Above you can the blanks he had prepared, both right hand and left hand. We were all righties in the class.

    This preparation by him was probably a huge time-saver for the class, but I suspect that drilling the holes accurately and straight is not easy. Something I will have to figure out when I am own my own and making more planes. He did demonstrate how you cut the escapement with a saw and a jig.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0719.jpg 
Views:	19 
Size:	57.0 KB 
ID:	91603Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0721.jpg 
Views:	21 
Size:	35.3 KB 
ID:	91604Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0723.jpg 
Views:	19 
Size:	47.6 KB 
ID:	91605

    You use your 1/10 mortise chisel to determine the opening of the mouth. (I will flip these pictures later when I have more time, sorry).

    Here are some general pictures of the class and my bench. Actually benches, as the room is set up for 10 people and only 6 actually showed up.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0726.jpg 
Views:	23 
Size:	60.4 KB 
ID:	91606Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0727.jpg 
Views:	22 
Size:	66.9 KB 
ID:	91607Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0732.jpg 
Views:	23 
Size:	75.7 KB 
ID:	91608Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0733.jpg 
Views:	22 
Size:	63.3 KB 
ID:	91609

    Off to class, more to follow tonight.
    “When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece.” - John Ruskin
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.” - Oscar Wilde

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,698


    Yeah, it seems that the margin of error between doesn't work at all, sort of works and clogs horribly/doesn't cut well, and actually mostly works is fairly small with these. I was thinking the approach to take might be to make a bunch of simpler planes (thinking rebate planes) and figure on junking the majority or even all of them as a skill building exercise in cutting and shaping the parts (could use cheaper wood that wouldn't wear but cuts well enough.. maybe poplar or maple cut offs?). That would avoid having to deal with most of the hollow/round issues but still be similar for the base plane... once that was down could try making some hollows and rounds

    Still looks like a lot of fun, there's a tempting array of other goodies in the background as well.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Bellingham
    Posts
    2,449
    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Mooney View Post


    Yeah, it seems that the margin of error between doesn't work at all, sort of works and clogs horribly/doesn't cut well, and actually mostly works is fairly small with these. I was thinking the approach to take might be to make a bunch of simpler planes (thinking rebate planes) and figure on junking the majority or even all of them as a skill building exercise in cutting and shaping the parts (could use cheaper wood that wouldn't wear but cuts well enough.. maybe poplar or maple cut offs?). That would avoid having to deal with most of the hollow/round issues but still be similar for the base plane... once that was down could try making some hollows and rounds

    Still looks like a lot of fun, there's a tempting array of other goodies in the background as well.
    Yes, exactly Ryan! As I am progressing through this class, I am thinking of ways that I could practice all the new things I am learning without sacrificing good wood or irons. As I mentioned this has been the most challenging class so far and I finalized realized why. I never had a class where there were so many things I have never done before. Things like using floats and carving tools; grinding profiles on steel, heat treating, etc. Most of the classes only had a couple of new techniques and they were most a variation of something I had done before.

    As for goodies in the background, this is for you Ryan.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0741.jpg 
Views:	14 
Size:	42.9 KB 
ID:	91615Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0742.jpg 
Views:	15 
Size:	50.1 KB 
ID:	91616Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0743.jpg 
Views:	15 
Size:	48.4 KB 
ID:	91617Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0744.jpg 
Views:	18 
Size:	56.3 KB 
ID:	91618Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0745.jpg 
Views:	15 
Size:	51.4 KB 
ID:	91619Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0746.jpg 
Views:	13 
Size:	48.3 KB 
ID:	91620
    Last edited by Bill Satko; 08-06-2015 at 03:33 AM.
    “When love and skill work together, expect a masterpiece.” - John Ruskin
    “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing.” - Oscar Wilde

Similar Threads

  1. Mouldings in Practice Class @ Port Townsend
    By Bill Satko in forum Handtool Project Showcase
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 08-11-2015, 03:41 PM
  2. Port Townsend School of Woodworking Reveiw
    By Bill Satko in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 02-24-2012, 01:10 PM
  3. Port-o-Mate Woodrack - $40 while supplies last
    By glenn bradley in forum Hot Deals
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-14-2011, 05:30 PM
  4. Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival
    By Bill Satko in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 09-24-2009, 05:37 PM
  5. Taking a Turning Class - Took the Class
    By Sean Wright in forum General Woodturning Q&A
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 02-05-2008, 12:40 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •