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Thread: How to best attach a top to a table base

  1. #1
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    How to best attach a top to a table base

    I'm hoping I can get a reply to this question without a whole lot of smart aleck comments.

    If you had a table top and a base that met like this, how would you attach the two?

    My thought is to put a threaded insert into the table top, and a recessed slot on the support with a bolt and washer going through the support to allow for side to side wood movement.

    Thanks in advance for your serious replies and help.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
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  2. #2
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    I'd go with figure 8 connectors on the inside of the cross members.
    Bill Arnold
    Citizen of Texas residing in Georgia.
    NRA Life Member and Member of Mensa
    My Weather Underground station

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Arnold View Post
    I'd go with figure 8 connectors on the inside of the cross members.
    Would those be strong enough to lift the table? The legs and the top are going to be pretty darn beefy, i.e. weigh a lot.
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Dowell View Post
    Would those be strong enough to lift the table? The legs and the top are going to be pretty darn beefy, i.e. weigh a lot.
    Your original thought is probably best in that case.
    Bill Arnold
    Citizen of Texas residing in Georgia.
    NRA Life Member and Member of Mensa
    My Weather Underground station

  5. #5
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    I like your idea, Brent. Another thought would be to attach a piece of metal angle to the inside of the cross piece and lag bolt through it into the top using elongated holes in the metal to accommodate movement.

  6. #6
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    It seems the big thing is to allow for lateral movement. I like the idea of a threaded insert over a lag bolt, but I think I might use some removable thread locker on the bolt to prevent it from backing out over time.

    The cross piece is pretty beefy, so should be able to cut the slot and recess with a router easy enough.
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  7. #7
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    I think the threaded insert idea should work, perhaps do a stationary hole in the middle of the support on each end, then oblong bolt slots on the outer ones.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  8. #8
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    Really like the idea of 3 on a side. That should work.
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  9. #9
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    Brent I used to have a maple butcher block top with a similar base. The way the manufacturer had set it up was to have 2 holes at each end that were wider than the bold. They used standard woodthread lags and washers.
    If memory serves it was a 3/8 lag and washer. The hole was about 9/16 plus the appropriate countersink to hide the bolt head. This allowed the top to move and not split.
    He who laughs last, thinks slowest

  10. #10
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    I would like to ask/suggest (dunno) that surely this attachment could be achieved by a large sliding dovetail. Given thickness of the top could this not be done ?
    I dont know just trying to think of a different way of attaching.
    Would add a nice feature to the piece.

    http://www.google.ca/search?q=tablet...7xCQy8AIKRM%3A




    Sent from my SGH-I337M using Tapatalk
    Last edited by Rob Keeble; 09-07-2015 at 02:51 PM.
    cheers

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