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Thread: Fids

  1. #1
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    Fids

    While waiting for the glue to dry turned a couple of fids for braiding and knot work.

    Top to bottom; mystery wood, lyptus, and ebony.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Good skew practice and a nice way to use up some small stuff if you know anyone into knots.

    Kind of enjoyed turning the ebony actually. Sharp skew and high speed turns like a dream.

    The lyptus handle I tried a new texturing idea and just took a whole lot of small divots out leaving behind a bunch of tiny facets. Doesn't really look like much (maybe better in a brighter wood) but feels really nice in the hand.

  2. #2
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    I'm one of the thirty or so people on the planet who know what a fid is, besides a good short Scrabble word. I used to do splices and eyes and backsplices, but I never used rope that was so heavy I couldn't separate the lay with my hands.Maybe I should make one and put it in the tool box, just so that when someone asks what it is, I can say, "Oh, that's a fid."
    Cheers,
    Roger


    The other member of Mensa, but not the NRA

    Everyone is a self-made person.

    "The thing about quotes on the internet is that you cannot confirm their veracity" -Abraham Lincoln

  3. #3
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    Some of the really hard twist rope can be a bit of a bear to splice without a fid - especially mid line (like for a cut splice, bight splice, cringles or similar) but yeah most of the time its not to hard to get the splice laid in without a fid. It does make it a bit easier to work the splice tight though.

    Generally I find it more useful for knot work when you're trying to work a knot tight around something (like say as a wrap for fid handle ) it can be really hard to pick up the strands without something like a fid or marlinspike.

    I'd bet there are more than 50 of us though - all those sailors out there.. somewhere..

  4. #4
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    Today I've learnt another english word. Thanks a lot!
    Best regards,
    Toni

    __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ _________________
    web site:http://www.toniciuraneta.com
    I also dream of a shop with north light where my hands can be busy, my soul rest and my mind wander...

  5. #5
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    Dad always talked about a fid when he was doing rope work. As an ex Royal Navy guy of his era splicing ropes or doing decorative knots was something he learnt pretty well. Like carving its a great pastime.
    Handy to have a fid though. He had a smooth metal one.
    Had a good rope knot app on my phone until recently. Gosh now cannot find it.


    Sent from my SGH-I337M using Tapatalk
    cheers

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Keeble View Post
    Dad always talked about a fid when he was doing rope work. As an ex Royal Navy guy of his era splicing ropes or doing decorative knots was something he learnt pretty well. Like carving its a great pastime.
    Handy to have a fid though. He had a smooth metal one.
    It's funny, I got to tour a fiber laying ship a few years back which is somewhere up near the top of technogeeks as far as shops go but there were fancy know decorating a good chunk of the main cabin. There were even quite a few interesting functional knots still being used on the deck to hold various pieces of this and that in place. The captain was a bit of a knot geek so we had a bit of a nice side conversation about that. So it seems that the traditional at least somewhat continues, not so sure about the navy folks anymore though, they're probably pretty busy with other stuff

    Technically the metal fid is a marlinspike, basically the difference is that fids are wood or bone and marlinespikes (marline is/was a type of tarred twine). I'm sure there is some historical reasoning for the difference but not sure what it is.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Keeble View Post
    Had a good rope knot app on my phone until recently. Gosh now cannot find it.
    Try animatedknots.com? I've never used thier app but they have one and generally pretty accurate explanations on the website.

  7. #7
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    I honestly did not know that is what they were called. Now me knows. For someone who does a lot of rope work, I imagine they are a needed tool. Cool idea!

  8. #8
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    like you said a handy tool if one is into knots and splicing lines. I say that because if you were truly an old salty sailor you would know that there is only one rope on a ship all the rest are called lines or sheets. Now can anyone tell me where the rope is?
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Baer View Post
    like you said a handy tool if one is into knots and splicing lines. I say that because if you were truly an old salty sailor you would know that there is only one rope on a ship all the rest are called lines or sheets. Now can anyone tell me where the rope is?
    Hmm.. well there is the the bell rope, the foot rope (for standing on under the yards), the hand rope in the galley, the yard and mast ropes (for hauling up and down the mast/yards), and of course all of the rope that has not yet been made up into lines... Of course lines are sheets (I guess some call them "sheet lines" ) when they're attached to a sail. I'm pretty sure I'm missing some here.

    I only know this much because of http://www.amazon.com/The-Young-Offi.../dp/0486402207 (although I have the leevalley reprint its now sadly back out of print - I admit to being slightly addicted to the leevalley old book reprints, they are very nice ).

    As a lubber its all rope to me though

    Nope leevalley still has it - I just failed at searching: http://www.leevalley.com/US/Wood/pag...096,46100&ap=2
    Last edited by Ryan Mooney; 09-14-2015 at 04:54 PM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Mooney View Post
    Hmm.. well there is the the bell rope, the foot rope (for standing on under the yards), the hand rope in the galley, the yard and mast ropes (for hauling up and down the mast/yards), and of course all of the rope that has not yet been made up into lines... Of course lines are sheets (I guess some call them "sheet lines" ) when they're attached to a sail. I'm pretty sure I'm missing some here.

    I only know this much because of http://www.amazon.com/The-Young-Offi.../dp/0486402207 (although I have the leevalley reprint its now sadly back out of print - I admit to being slightly addicted to the leevalley old book reprints, they are very nice ).

    As a lubber its all rope to me though

    Nope leevalley still has it - I just failed at searching: http://www.leevalley.com/US/Wood/pag...096,46100&ap=2
    well going back nearly 50 years ago while in boot camp in San Diego during our basic seamanship course we were taught that the only rope was the ships bell rope and ecerything else was either a line or a sheet. Now the next nautical trivial questions is whose duty was it to polish the ships bell.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

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