Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18

Thread: Humidity??

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Mount Vernon, Ohio
    Posts
    75

    Question Humidity??

    I didn't know where to post this so, it's here unless the mods want to move it.
    My shop is a 10X16 wooden shed and I'm lucky enough to have electricity in it. I'm basically limited to propane heat right now and have been using a Big Buddy heater with success. But, with the heat comes too much humidity causing rust on all cast surfaces and steel tools in drawers. I guess that cancels the previous statement about success.
    My question is, has anyone else had to deal with this problem? Will a small (how small) dehumidifier help?
    I have a very limited budget so I'm looking for relatively inexpensive solutions, if those exist. What the local professionals (?) suggest would take me over a year to pay for, so there would be no need for the shop by then.
    Thank you in advance for any and all expertise shared here.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
    Posts
    12,258
    Roger I have lived through your experience and the only solution i found was to move my tools into the basement for winter and leave the rest to be as the weather sought to make it, making sure to put a good layer of wax on things such as cast iron surfaces.

    Its more than just the humidity. What is happening is that you heat up the shop and it heats up the tools given they metal when the heat is over and the air cools it results in condensation on all the prior warmed up tools and thats when our buddy rust comes out to play.

    My first winter i tried heating the very airy garage i moved to, i managed to make it bearable to work in but it was not while working that the issue came on. It was after when the cold nights came and those warm tools got saturated in moisture.

    Unless you can keep the heat on all the time and insulate the shop there is no winning this one.

    At my prior home i had a shop that was fully insulated. I had a overhead radiant tube heater connected to natural gas. I set it to run such that it kept the temps above freezing when i was not in the shop and it did not take much to warm up the place when i was in it. But it was insulated to R22 with 6 inch stud bays etc and double pain gas filled windows. Never had rust problem in there and in summer i ran a small aircon to keep the humidity down.

    Moving my tools in doors has been a pain in the rear big time because in summer i have to move them out again but dont. It means i migrate them bit by bit as needed through the summer.

    So i dont know if there is any real solution other than a sealed up always heated in winter shop.
    cheers

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Wapakoneta, OH
    Posts
    611
    Not disagreeing with Rob, but I can't help but wonder if using an electric space heater would help. Of course, that would assume you have enough electric to run it. But if you have power for a dehumidifier, you can probably run a heater.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Tahlequah, OK
    Posts
    272
    Both of those responses are correct. You want to keep a fairly consistent temperature and that temperature needs to be above the dew point. If you can keep the temperature say 50F with electric and heat it up to 60-65F when working with propane it should be better. Also, since the propane heater you are using is not vented, it is adding a lot of humidity as well since water is a byproduct of the combustion. If you could go to a little direct vented propane heater it would help the humidity in the shop and lower the dew point! Depending on your propane source you could let the vented propane maintain the minimum temp if you want.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,450
    It addition to what has been said, waxing surfaces and keeping things well lubed can go a long way. My shop is not climate controlled at all and I've not had any issues with rust here in the midwest. For surfaces, you can also keep an unfinished piece of underlayment on them to prevent any condensation from sitting on the metal, as it will wick away the moisture. I have my dad's saw that I used growing up which he always kept with a piece of underlayment on top when unused. The top looks mostly new, no pitting or surface rust. This was his main job site saw when building houses, so it's seen many years of use out in the elements. I mostly just use wax on my tops and have had good luck though.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Tahlequah, OK
    Posts
    272
    Just thought of something else, maybe some VCI paper in drawers with bare metal tools? I don't know how effective they would be on tool slides or larger surfaces out in the open but it works well in other applications!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Mount Vernon, Ohio
    Posts
    75
    Quote Originally Posted by fred hargis View Post
    Not disagreeing with Rob, but I can't help but wonder if using an electric space heater would help. Of course, that would assume you have enough electric to run it. But if you have power for a dehumidifier, you can probably run a heater.
    Yes, electric is available but, expensive to maintain the minimum heat in my shop.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Mount Vernon, Ohio
    Posts
    75
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Johnson View Post
    Both of those responses are correct. You want to keep a fairly consistent temperature and that temperature needs to be above the dew point. If you can keep the temperature say 50F with electric and heat it up to 60-65F when working with propane it should be better. Also, since the propane heater you are using is not vented, it is adding a lot of humidity as well since water is a byproduct of the combustion. If you could go to a little direct vented propane heater it would help the humidity in the shop and lower the dew point! Depending on your propane source you could let the vented propane maintain the minimum temp if you want.
    You hit on my thought. The humidity mostly comes from the heater which leads me to believe that a dehumidifier running along with the heater may help. It's just too costly to try without more knowledge about it.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Mount Vernon, Ohio
    Posts
    75
    Rob, I appreciate your thoughts but, I really have to disagree with you to a point.
    What I had noticed last year was that the condensation occurred while the heater was just getting started to raise the shop temperature. The reverse of what you stated, if I understood you correctly.
    That is what led me to believe that my problem was being created solely by the heater therefore fixable.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Tahlequah, OK
    Posts
    272
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Pozzi View Post
    You hit on my thought. The humidity mostly comes from the heater which leads me to believe that a dehumidifier running along with the heater may help. It's just too costly to try without more knowledge about it.
    Be on the lookout for a vented heater. That solves a heap of your trouble. A dehumidifier will be hard pressed to keep up with the moisture that heater cranks out plus it burns through electricity. Good luck, let us know what path you take!

Similar Threads

  1. hot with very high humidity
    By Paul Gallian in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-04-2012, 02:55 PM
  2. Gluing up at 8% humidity
    By Carol Reed in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 07-11-2012, 11:29 PM
  3. Humidity Humidity Humidity
    By Dave Hawksford in forum Finishing School
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 09-27-2011, 06:33 PM
  4. heat and humidity
    By Mark Kosmowski in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 06-12-2008, 01:03 PM
  5. Problem with shop humidity...
    By Stuart Ablett in forum General Woodturning Q&A
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 11-01-2006, 04:37 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •