Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Rasps

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
    Posts
    12,251

    Rasps

    I have a question for any of you that have purchased a good quality set of hand stitched rasps.

    How have you found them to be in regards durability when used obviously strictly on wood? I just made a post on metal files for sharpening hand saws and this point has got me wondering how the hand stitched rasps are working out.

    I would like to add a couple to my carving kit but been nervous to pull the trigger without any prior experience or witness from anyone i trust.

    If you have any what do you use them for and what size and make do you have?

    While back i was trying to organize a group deal on some french make but that fell by the way.

    Now i want to attend to this at same time as i do files.

    Decent tools make a huge difference i have been finding and working in the shop with the right tool makes all the difference too.
    cheers

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Wapakoneta, OH
    Posts
    611
    I have 3 Auriou rasps. I'm not sure I've had mine long enough to answer the durability question; my oldest is maybe 3 years old. But it gets used on pretty much on any curves I cut for final shaping before I sand them smooth. I have the 9"/10 grain cabinet rasp, the 6"/15 grain modeler's rasp, and a 6"/13 grain rat tail. I'm not a big hand tool user, but they do work out well for the things I do. Based on the recommendation from someone here (I think) I also bought a Shinto saw rasp, it gets used on things like Bondo, and manmade wood(plywood, etc.). The Auriou have a breathtaking price, but they seemed to be a little cheaper from Lie Neilson when I bought mine.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    1,367
    I only have one Grobet rasp - i want more like it. I have only had it about 6 years but I see no signs of it losing it's ability to rasp away wood anytime soon.
    Jason Beam
    Sacramento, CA

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,698
    Not sure on long term durability. I can say the couple of premium rasps I do have cut a lot faster and cleaner than the older (and to be honest junky) ones I was using. I'm also still a big fan of the iwasaki files but they aren't quite in the same class either (for the price they're excellent to fill in for some sizes though). I have one Aurio and one Gramercy (TFWW) and would buy either again given the choice (its hard to compare directly because they're different shapes and grain, I think the Aurio is a bit "smoother" cut but am mostly hand waving).

    Oh and this little jobby: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000H1VZ5G such a handy little fellow!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Yorktown, Virginia
    Posts
    5,014
    I only have one premium rasp, an Auriou cabinetmaker's rasp 200x23x4.5-G11 purchased about seven years ago for $94.99. It is the standout of my fleet of mostly big box and Harbor Freight files and rasps. If it ever gets dull I'll buy another.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Wapakoneta, OH
    Posts
    611
    Let me ask you guys a question: I read when I bought my first one that a key to it having a long, productive life was correct usage. Whatever it was I was reading went on to say that meant using the rasp to cut on a forward stroke, then lifting it off the workpiece, pull it back and repeat the cut. This is as opposed to the way a lot of folks use a metal file, which is to just go back and forth without ever lifting it off the workpiece. Do you do that, and think it matters one way or the other? (BTW, that is how I've been using my rasps.)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,698
    Quote Originally Posted by fred hargis View Post
    Whatever it was I was reading went on to say that meant using the rasp to cut on a forward stroke, then lifting it off the workpiece, pull it back and repeat the cut. This is as opposed to the way a lot of folks use a metal file, which is to just go back and forth without ever lifting it off the workpiece. Do you do that, and think it matters one way or the other? (BTW, that is how I've been using my rasps.)
    I do, but its mostly habit from file work. Wood can be moderately abrasive so I'm sure there is some impact, how much and whether it would actually be noticeable at the amount I use these things is pretty debatable. I'd argue its still worth doing if only to keep the habit fresh where it does matter and practically I find that it also makes me think about the cut a bit more which often yields better results.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    somewhere east of Queen Creek, AZ - South East of Phoenix
    Posts
    8,529
    all of my rasps are hand me downs from my dad and they are quit old id say some at least 50 years old and although i am not able to do the woodworking I used to do I still use them on occasion and they are still holding up fine. I was taught to lift after stroking each time so I do that out of habit. On a side not in place of rasps I also use a micro plane a lot also. I started using one after I took a course from Sam Maloof and he used one for shaping parts on his chairs and said he really liked them.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    1,367
    Quote Originally Posted by fred hargis View Post
    Let me ask you guys a question: I read when I bought my first one that a key to it having a long, productive life was correct usage. Whatever it was I was reading went on to say that meant using the rasp to cut on a forward stroke, then lifting it off the workpiece, pull it back and repeat the cut. This is as opposed to the way a lot of folks use a metal file, which is to just go back and forth without ever lifting it off the workpiece. Do you do that, and think it matters one way or the other? (BTW, that is how I've been using my rasps.)

    Absolutely - its also how you should be using files, too - never pull them back on the work, that just blunts the file prematurely.
    Jason Beam
    Sacramento, CA

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
    Posts
    12,251
    Thanks guys for all the input and feedback. I too was taught press down on push stroke and pick up for return. Pretty much ingrained in me through a cane at school.

    For us i guess Lee Valley is our best option but they not available at store so i will wait for free shipping before i get a couple of woodworking rasps.



    Sent from my SGH-I337M using Tapatalk
    cheers

Similar Threads

  1. Carving a snail and the use of rasps
    By Rob Keeble in forum Carving
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-16-2015, 05:16 PM
  2. Nicholson #49 & #50 rasps on sale
    By Jim DeLaney in forum Hot Deals
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-23-2012, 08:25 PM
  3. How Hand Stitched Rasps are Made
    By Dan Gonzales in forum Neander Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 12-13-2011, 12:43 AM
  4. Hand-stitched rasps
    By Noel Liogier in forum New Tools
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 12-02-2011, 08:58 PM
  5. How do you clean your files and rasps
    By Don Baer in forum Neander Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 08-28-2010, 02:53 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •