Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 45

Thread: 1911 Grips - Success!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,427

    1911 Grips - Success!

    My nephew asked me the other day if I could do some 1911 grips for him, so found some 3d models of some blank ones and got to playing with designs. This is what I came up with.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	eaglegrips.jpg 
Views:	141 
Size:	60.0 KB 
ID:	92953

    Since my machine has been running pretty well and all my vcarve files have been working as they show on the preview, I went straight to trying it on some "good" wood. First step was hogging out the waste, which was done with a 1/4" upcut spiral, that worked as expected.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	2015-10-18 20.02.00.jpg 
Views:	39 
Size:	38.5 KB 
ID:	92954

    The finishing 3d paths using the 1/8" ball nose didn't seem to be cutting deep enough though, as I was seeing the steps from the 1/4" bit. I decided a second pass lowering my z axis may be in order, so setup for that.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	2015-10-18 20.41.04.jpg 
Views:	45 
Size:	39.7 KB 
ID:	92955

    However, the z axis appeared to have lost several steps right off the bat, eventually diving into the wood and snapping the bit.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	2015-10-18 20.55.32.jpg 
Views:	45 
Size:	38.8 KB 
ID:	92956 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	2015-10-18 20.55.36.jpg 
Views:	49 
Size:	30.9 KB 
ID:	92957

    This last run was with the dust boot removed, so other than perhaps I had it taking too big of a bite, I'm not sure what went wrong. I do have a smaller stepper on my z axis, so an upgrade to a larger motor may be in order.

    I remounted the work after the last shot and tried running the rest of my operations to see if the hole alignments and cut-out was correct, but ended up losing steps on that bit also. Perhaps maple is a bit too hard, I did notice some similar problems on some white oak yesterday too.

    I'll be giving this another try this week on some softer wood to see if everything goes as expected.
    Last edited by Darren Wright; 10-26-2015 at 04:36 AM.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,002
    Those should look nice once the glitches get worked out.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
    Posts
    12,243
    Nice design, be interested to see what you find went wrong. With all you have done lately i would have thought same as you and just gone for it. I guess there is more to doing this cnc than meets the eye.

    Something at some point that i would like to see is say all the CNC guys that are present on our forum taking the same file and running it and posting pics of the result. Sounds to me like most of you are using very similar software and would be interesting to see the variables that pop up.
    cheers

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,825
    I beginning to understand better the learning curve for you and the machine. Those grips should turn out nice. There is always a demand for custom pistol grips. You could be on to something.
    "Folks is funny critters."

    Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so, too. ~Voltaire

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Thomasville, GA
    Posts
    5,987
    Nice looking project, Darren! I'm sure the finished product will look great when you work out the bugs. It gives me another couple projects to think!
    Bill Arnold
    Citizen of Texas residing in Georgia.
    NRA Life Member and Member of Mensa
    My Weather Underground station

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,427
    Thanks guys, my goal is to get the machine where is can produce product without me babysitting it. The types of woods, bits used, and little nuances that come with each operation are one of the final hurdles I need to get past. I'm starting to keep a log for these to reference so I don't have to repeat the same mistakes.

    Biggest issue was I was taking too big of bight for the little ball nose bit, I'll reduce that on the next attempt. Also that I added the dust boot, the extra weight and drag of the brush add a little more load to the motor, which was already on edge. I've gone ahead and ordered a larger motor, same size as my x and y motors (425 oz/in), upgrading it from a 282 oz/in motor. In reality the z axis has just as much, if not more load than the x and y axis', which is the opposite of what I thought when I purchased it. It should be here in a few days and we'll give it another go.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,353
    Keeping a log sounds like a very prudent idea. With the laser, I've taken to creating a sample and writing down all the parameters I used to generate it right on the wood with it and will keep those as a a guide.
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    East Freeetown, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,014
    One thing I have noticed with lost steps is that they get lost when the "Z" retracts.
    Loose steps going up - and the next time down it goes further.

    I slowed the acceleration on the "Z" axis to correct it.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    East Freeetown, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,014
    I would still go ahead and upgrade the "Z" axis stepper anyway.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,427
    Quote Originally Posted by Leo Voisine View Post
    One thing I have noticed with lost steps is that they get lost when the "Z" retracts.
    Loose steps going up - and the next time down it goes further.

    I slowed the acceleration on the "Z" axis to correct it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Leo Voisine View Post
    I would still go ahead and upgrade the "Z" axis stepper anyway.

    yup, slowed it down to about 20 ipm and was still losing steps, but got notice the new motor shipped today.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

Similar Threads

  1. Gun Grips - cnc update!
    By Darren Wright in forum Flatwork Project Showcase
    Replies: 38
    Last Post: 05-11-2013, 04:13 AM
  2. CNCing gun grips - has anyone done this?
    By Joseph Shaul in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 01-25-2011, 03:28 PM
  3. Wood Gun Grips
    By Pete Simmons in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 09-04-2010, 10:16 PM
  4. Finishes for Gun Grips
    By Darren Wright in forum Finishing School
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-20-2010, 12:47 AM
  5. gun grips
    By Dawn Kight in forum Lathe Project Showcase
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 08-28-2009, 01:55 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •