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Thread: New Bosch table saw accessories?

  1. #1
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    Jan 2008
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    New Bosch table saw accessories?

    I just purchased my first table saw, a Bosch 4100-09. I was debating between the Dewalt portable or the Bosch portable. I am very limited for space in my garage so that is why I opted for a portable TS. Obviously, I would have loved to get a good cabinet saw, but I am hoping in the future I will have space for one. Anyway, I do have a few other Bosch tools and I really like them plus the Bosch gets good reviews and the box store had 11% rebate. I am still in process of setting it up. So far I really like the gravity stand. I just bolted the saw to the stand. Now, I am wondering what accessories I really should get to help with properly setting it up and for future setups for different cuts. I understand this is a question on what I really plan on doing with the TS too. First, I plan on building some shadow boxes and then possibly a nightstand. I am just looking for some opinions that is all.

    1. Would digital gauges really be worth it or just a good quality steel scale be suffice?

    2. Zero clearance inserts, if so which ones do you use?

    3. Saw blades, which do you recommend?

    Thanks,

    John

  2. #2
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    Congrats on the new saw, do let us know how it goes as you go along! I've also heard good things about the gravity stand but haven't see one in person.

    These are just imho.

    Quote Originally Posted by John Jussel View Post
    1. Would digital gauges really be worth it or just a good quality steel scale be suffice?
    Skip the digital and just do direct transfer.

    Quote Originally Posted by John Jussel View Post
    2. Zero clearance inserts, if so which ones do you use?
    Yes, but just make your own. They are mostly disposable in the long run and generally not that hard to make, although I'm not sure on this specific saw... hopefully someone else will know for this one.

    Quote Originally Posted by John Jussel View Post
    3. Saw blades, which do you recommend?
    Most of the Freud are a pretty good value and generally work pretty well. I'd start there and if you're not happy move up. A step up from that is tenryu (I bought some through amazon), http://www.carbideprocessors.com/ and of course Forrest (http://www.sliversmill.com/).

  3. #3
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    To use any tablesaw safely, you need outfeed support. Easy to make yourself. Since your interest right now is portability, consider a flip-up support.
    ++++++

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  4. #4
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    Congrats on the new saw. This article has some good, low-cost tips for setting things up:

    http://www.woodmagazine.com/wood/pdf...ds-038free.pdf

    Most of us have a bunch of tools and accessories we thought we couldn't live without, only to find that we can.

    My most-used TS setup tool is a plastic drafting triangle. It was inexpensive and has been very accurate. When I set my blade to 90, I know it's dead on. Same with 45. I don't think I've ever built anything that needed any angle other than those two, but I also have a Beall Tilt Box that I bought years ago thinking I might need one.

    I purchased a dial indicator and fancy machined bar for making sure my blade and fence were accurately aligned with the miter gauge slots, but I see the article above has a very workable alternative using a piece of scrap wood, a screws, and a miter gauge. It's very important to get the blade and fence set up to be parallel with the miter slots, but it's not necessary to spend a lot of money for the tools to do it.

    On the subject of miter gauges, I HIGHLY recommend investing in a good aftermarket miter gauge. I love my Incra 1000 SE. It's one of those tools I can trust to be dead on, every single time. I added a sacrificial fence to mine, and I wouldn't use any miter gauge without one.

    Another TS accessory I wouldn't want to be without is my GRR-ripper push block. I've used push sticks -- both shop-made and store bought -- since the 1970s, but they don't offer nearly as good of control as the GRR-ripper.

    I respectfully disagree with Ryan about making a zero clearance insert. At least for my Ridgid TS, it was much easier and more accurate to purchase one. (For my saw, I'd need to have a bandsaw and router table to make my own. I didn't have either of those tools when I first got my saw. Other saws might have simpler throat plates.) I started out with a HDPE throat plate from Peachtree, but didn't like it because it had some flex to it. I eventually bought a couple of phenolic plates from Rockler about 10 years ago, and have only used one of them so far. The one I use has only been used with thin kerf blades, so the slot hasn't gotten any wider with use. I use one of my old plastic Peachtree throat plates for dado cuts. (The flex isn't really a problem with dado cuts). For 45 cuts, so far I've just used the metal throat plate that came with my saw. If I ever have a project that will require more than three or four such cuts, I'll bust out my spare phenolic plate and cut a 45 slot in it, but so far I've not really had the need.

    I totally agree with Ryan regarding the Freud blades. Great bang for the buck, although I use one of their mid-level models. I don't have them handy to tell you the model name or number, but I think they are the Freud "Industrial" blades. I'm not sure if the Big Box stores sell them. I've bought mine from Rocker and Amazon. When I was making a lot of cutting boards, I was consistently getting rip cuts that were glue-up ready. Scott Spencer is our resident TS blade expert here. Search the forum for some of his reviews and comparisons of various makes and models of blades.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

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  5. #5
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    Thank you everyone for replying. This information was exactly what I was looking for. I really like Family Woodworking!

    John

  6. #6
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    I will add to the blade story.

    I have a sears table saw its a 1.75hp motor essentially contractor saw In a cabinet.
    What one needs to consider with blades is the power u have and type of wood u cutting and adjust type of blade accordingly.
    My recommendation for the power and type of saw u have is to take a look at the diablo range at home depot. They the Freud contractor line.
    They a thin kerf blade which means they need to have less power to plough their way through wood.
    For less than US$100 u could get yourself a 24 tooth ripping blade and a 50 tooth crosscut blade. and you will get nice cuts and be able to do amazing things with your saw. Its all good and well buying a 80 dollar or more full kerf blade but a saw like yours is not a 3 or 5 HP cabinet saw.
    What I do is rip with 24 tooth, then clean up that same rip with the 50 tooth and I have a glue line finish after. Sometimes I even rip off the bat with the 50 tooth.

    I fully agree with Vaughn on miter gauge issue and on not spending big dollar on setup jigs, but do make sure to do setup. Do a bit of searching on the forum many posts cover home grown devices for blade alignment. Save ur coin for wood

    BTW welcome to the family.

    Sent from my SGH-I337M using Tapatalk
    cheers

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Keeble View Post
    ...What I do is rip with 24 tooth, then clean up that same rip with the 50 tooth and I have a glue line finish after. Sometimes I even rip off the bat with the 50 tooth....
    I rip with the 24 tooth and it's ready for glue-up. IMO if you're having to do cleanup after the rip your saw's not set up right, you're using the wrong (or dull) blade, or there's a problem with your technique. I save the 50 tooth blade (I think mine's a 48 tooth) for crosscuts only.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    I respectfully disagree with Ryan about making a zero clearance insert. At least for my Ridgid TS, it was much easier and more accurate to purchase one. (For my saw, I'd need to have a bandsaw and router table to make my own. I didn't have either of those tools when I first got my saw. Other saws might have simpler throat plates.)
    Yeah, you'll notice the abundant use of weasel words in my reply It definitely depends on what other tooling you have, the saw, and how cheap or broke you are.

  9. #9
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    Another vote for the Freud blades. I use a blade which sells for about $40 Cdn, and has a diagram on it showing that it is excellent for crosscuts and good for rip cuts. I use it for cross cuts and hardly have to sand after. I also use it for short rip cuts. For heavier rip cuts I have a Freud rip blade that cost about the same. Again, very smooth cutting. The first time I used the blade for a crosscut, the pitch of the motor didn't change when I fed the wood into the blade. I had to check to make sure I had remembered to raise the blade, but it was cutting with almost no resistance.
    Cheers,
    Roger


    The other member of Mensa, but not the NRA

    Everyone is a self-made person.

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