Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19

Thread: ? 4 Leo re:software

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Escondido, CA
    Posts
    5,167

    ? 4 Leo re:software

    ...or anyone who wants to chime in.

    I have not yet set up my CNC computer. I did get a PC w/WinXP for that. It will be dedicated to the machine. My daily computer is a MacBook. Trying to decide whether I should learn Vetric or Fusion 360. Envisioned CNC application could be almost anything. Not fond of restrictions.

    I have some AutoCAD experience (~15 years ago). Got fairly proficient at it. Know nothing about Vetric. Reasonably proficient in SketchUP. Machine language is to be Mach 3.

    What do I need to consider before deciding? I have to learn something, so which ought it to be?

    Thanks.
    ++++++

    Some say the land of milk and honey; others say the land of fruits and nuts. All together my sort of heaven.

    Power is not taken. It is given. Who have you given yours to? Hmmmm?

    Carol Reed

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,437
    Question to you would be, what do you plan to do the most with the cnc?

    Sent from my GT-N5110 using Tapatalk
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Billings Missouri near Springfield Mo
    Posts
    4,552
    Im playing with Fusion 360 right now It just feels better than Skech-up
    A Turn N Time
    Components for John Smith Organs and the Hobby Organ Builder

    Frog Pond Guitars


    Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    East Freeetown, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,018
    I don't know enough about Fusion yet. I am also an AutoCAD user from 1987 - 2004 professionally. Lately more into Solidworks.

    Fusion is full 3D and does have CAM capabilities, that seem to pretty well rounded. Seems to be pretty functional. Not sure how user friendly, but I did create some simple G-code pretty easily. But then, I am pretty well versed in Cad and Cam, so I know how to get around and get what I want. It may not be so east for everyone. Not sure if it supports 4-th axis, at least the way I want to see it. I don't see it to be like AutoCAD. It's more like mechanical Desktop. I have never seen inventor, but I think it all started as Mechanical desktop for Autodesk.

    The Vectric products are very user friendly, and very functional.

    I am always pushing boundaries, so, you should not take my explorations to mean there is a lack of functionality to Vectric. I am very impressed with what CAN be done in Vectric. The legs for my machine impress me. With some imagination, and creativity, there is a LOT more to learn. But, there IS a price tag to go with it.

    Price wise - you cannot beat FREE. Fusion 360 is FREE to the hobbyist. Actually Autodesk has pretty much been on that bandwagon for as long as I can remember. They never really did anything to stop pirating of AutoCAD to the home user, in fact encouraged it. It helps them get users familiar with their software.

    Try Fusion360 - you have nothing to loose. I get the feeling it is mechanical in nature, not so much artistic. For me, I really want the artistic side of things. I like the mechanical also, but I use artistic more.

    I was playing with Fusion tonight, but it crashed on me. Might be my fault.

    I have also been looking at Rhino and RhinoCAM. Great artistic full 3D functionality. Steep learning curve. Higher price tag.

    As to limitations, they all have something they will fall short on. To get FULL functionality, flawlessly, that will be in the 10's of thousands of dollars.

    If you do go Vectric, you can do it is stages starting with Cut2D desktop and upgrading to Aspire. Fusion is free for non-commercial users.

    Vectric is about the lowest learning curve, very easy to use.

    I guess if you ask specific questions about what you want to do to start, then ramp up the questions to where you "want" to go, I can help steer a little. I do not know all things, but I can maybe help.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Escondido, CA
    Posts
    5,167
    Where I 'want' to go requires a complex answer. My initial ideas are artistic in nature but my brain is also very mechanical; i.e., I can see making jigs again with it. I did fairly well with that. I also see a niche market around here for being a small job shop for high tech businesses. The guy who owns the makers space (Dan) is using the big laser machine after hours for this purpose and he often gets requests for stuff that is better made with a CNC. We have talked about collaborating on some projects. As he develops the space with woodworking tools, I will be his woodworking instructor.

    That's all the 'hard' information I have at this point. My plan is to develop multiple little streams of revenue to finish my house and feather my nest going forward. So product line is widely varied. And I don't want to have to learn multiple pieces of software of I can avoid it.
    ++++++

    Some say the land of milk and honey; others say the land of fruits and nuts. All together my sort of heaven.

    Power is not taken. It is given. Who have you given yours to? Hmmmm?

    Carol Reed

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    falcon heights, minnesota
    Posts
    5,609
    carol, as far as what is going on here, this is about all i can say at the moment. as a computer guy, i would say upgrade to either windows 7 or 10 first, as xp is no longer supported, you are on your own if something happens to it. as for cad, i've worked with sketchup for years now, designing our furniture and such here, and it works pretty good for me. i've used it in my own way to create the vectors for various designs. as for other software, i've picked up the cut2d from vectric, and haven't looked back, easy to use, and darned near fun as well. later on this spring, i'll be picking up the vcarve program as well, to cover the bases that cut2d doesn't. as for projects and what to do with the machine, i started from the point of working up the projects on sketchup, and then getting the machine, rather than getting the machine, and rapping myself on the head with a mallet (which usually kick starts the design process), and asking myself "now what do i do with it?". hopefully some of this helps you, but, i would upgrade the operating system first.
    benedictione omnes bene

    www.burroviejowoodworking.com

    check out my etsy store, buroviejowoodworking

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,357
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Noren View Post
    i would say upgrade to either windows 7 or 10 first, as xp is no longer supported, you are on your own if something happens to it.

    Technically, Windows 7 and earlier are no longer supported. Unlike Windows 8, I haven't heard all that much bad about windows 10, except for a few data collection issues. I do agree with Dan that XP is a liability and you should upgrade as soon as possible to something else.
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,357
    I take that back, Windows 7 is supported for a few more days....

    http://www.zdnet.com/article/windows-7-support-what-happens-on-january-13-2015/
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    falcon heights, minnesota
    Posts
    5,609
    as far as 10 goes, i've used it for a while on the laptop that is the brain for the cnc, been very stable, and so far all products and programs have worked very well with it.
    benedictione omnes bene

    www.burroviejowoodworking.com

    check out my etsy store, buroviejowoodworking

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,437
    As long at you're not getting on the internet with XP, it will be fine for running the cnc, stick with it. Just use a usb drive to move files to it and don't connect it to the network.

    I'm just now starting to try fusion out and do the tutorials. I've been looking for something that can do bezier curves and meshes better than sketchup. I bought the Turbocad home version as it was advertised as 3d, but it didn't really have what I was looking for. Blender is another I started to try, but it's a totally different beast to me. Since the Fusion is free, I'd give it a try and see if it will fit your needs. For design vcarve works well for importing and carving intricate drawings, pockets, cutouts, etc. If you're looking to do 3d models you'll probably need to look at Fusion or another product.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

Similar Threads

  1. new software
    By Dan Noren in forum New Systems and Builds
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 02-11-2016, 05:13 PM
  2. Software and Value
    By Rob Keeble in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 02-19-2015, 11:46 PM
  3. CAD software?
    By Jeff Horton in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 11-18-2009, 01:54 PM
  4. CAD Software ?
    By Darren Wright in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-15-2008, 04:13 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •