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Thread: Life in Tokyo....

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807

    Life in Tokyo....

    I have a client, who just bought a new house, and his old house has some furniture that needs removing.

    The biggest problem is this table....




    There is a seam in the very middle of the table.




    The legs are removeable.

    The top is 240cm long by 120 cm wide.

    The problem is that the table is on the second floor, and does not fit out any of the hallways etc to the 1st floor.
    When the table was purchased they had to use a crane and remove the window to get the table in.
    The window in this room is 2/3 fixed window, and 1/3 open outwards, so to take the table out, we have to get a glass shop in to remove the whole sash, the client would like to NOT have to do that this time.

    If the table is cut in half, right down the middle, on the seam, it can then be removed and reassembled later in the new house, or at least that is the thinking.

    Now I'm looking at using my Festool TS55, I have one 1400mm track and one 800mm track for a total of 2200mm or 220 cm long, I guess I need another length of track.

    OK now this is the whole "Life in Tokyo" thing.

    In the US the FS 1400/2 track is $129

    Here in Japan, the same track FS 1400/2 is 28,875 yen ($230) not quite double, but you get the picture.

    OK I was thinking, why not buy the 2700 (106") super long one and just be done with it....?

    US FS 2700 $321
    Japan FS 2700 is 109,132 yen or $871, wow!

    Not sure what I'm going to do yet, I could get the extra length I need by buying a second FS 800 rail for about $150.

    Yeah, life in the big city.

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    No, not all of SoCal is Los Angeles!
    Posts
    9,077
    For a one shot deal I would be tempted to make a shop made pair of guides. The big advantage of the track is that it guides the saw and removes any unsteadiness along the path that might cause a rough cut. A pair of strips that capture the saw base may do the same thing for you and when you're done, you don't have to store the new and very expensive tracks. I find myself making decisions on frequency of use and storage between use scenarios a lot lately ;-)
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    falcon heights, minnesota
    Posts
    5,610
    instead of cutting the table, why not have the client pay to get it out the way he got it in?
    benedictione omnes bene

    www.burroviejowoodworking.com

    check out my etsy store, buroviejowoodworking

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    North West Indiana
    Posts
    6,099
    I am thinking a very nice, straight board clamped on the table and run the saw along that edge. Of course set the board so the saw is against it and the blade is cutting down the middle.

    Then for reassembly, drill and insert metal rods on the one side that mate with corresponding holes on the other so all stays aligned, but,,,, then maybe four? sets of turnbuckle type thingamajigs that would keep the two halves tightened yet could be split in half again later if needed to be moved, sold, given away, etc.
    Jon

    God and family, the rest is icing on the cake. I'm so far behind, I think I'm in first place!

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  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,462
    Looks like an OK solution. Any idea what the core of the table is? Going to take some cardboard templates up/down the stairs to make sure they will go after doing this?
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word boo. Robert Brault

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Oak Harbor Washington on Whidbey Island
    Posts
    3,134
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Noren View Post
    instead of cutting the table, why not have the client pay to get it out the way he got it in?

    "the client would like to NOT have to do that this time".
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
    "If it ain't round you may be a knuckle dragger""Turners drag their nuckles too, they just do it at a higher RPM"Bart

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Nova Scotia, 45N 64W
    Posts
    1,247
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan Shively View Post
    I am thinking a very nice, straight board clamped on the table and run the saw along that edge. Of course set the board so the saw is against it and the blade is cutting down the middle.

    Then for reassembly, drill and insert metal rods on the one side that mate with corresponding holes on the other so all stays aligned, but,,,, then maybe four? sets of turnbuckle type thingamajigs that would keep the two halves tightened yet could be split in half again later if needed to be moved, sold, given away, etc.
    I've seen something like what Jon's suggesting. I'll call it a "countertop bolt" that runs between two corresponding shallow countersunk holes on the underside. Alignment pins would be a good idea too.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,701
    Ouch, that long rail would be cheaper to remove the window!

    Quote Originally Posted by Darren Wright View Post
    Any idea what the core of the table is?
    Good point Darren. Definitely would be unfortunate to cut it in half and then have an even bigger problem putting it back together! If its solid I want some of those slabs

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    East Freeetown, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,022
    Yeah, I was wondering about reassembly.

    It's a veneer? Will the table need to be sanded and refinished?

    It just might be less expensive to go through the window.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Escondido, CA
    Posts
    5,175
    Certainly the client paying for the extra track you need is less expensive than the window/crane scenario! Also recommend the countertop bolts. Now your issue is storage of the extra track. But you are a storage guru from what I have seen!
    ++++++

    Some say the land of milk and honey; others say the land of fruits and nuts. All together my sort of heaven.

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