Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Intangible Value when buying tools

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
    Posts
    12,256

    Intangible Value when buying tools

    So today I purchased a Lincoln Welder. Yeah I know it's not woodworking machine but...

    Anyway the point I wish to bring to the fore is that of value we often tend to forget when seeking to buy a new machine.

    I think some of this has to do with low expectations when it comes to foreign essentially no name brands that are nothing more than rip offs of original brands.

    The result is when you come across it one is amazed but also delighted.

    But I would like to remind all that when buying a machine there is more to it than the machine and the price.

    Today opening the box of my new Lincoln Welder I saw the immediate difference.

    It started with proper packaging.
    Then accessories that don't come with the no name brands but add to the cost of getting started and...if you not aware of it then it may mean another trip to the store.

    In my case this was...gas regulator, tips and rolls of wire to start with.

    Next was the 3 yr warranty with option to extend by 2 more years.

    But the biggest intangible was the manual and the parts list and a catalogue of appropriate welding books and finally there is a learn to weld DVD.

    Now what is the value of all of that.....

    How often do you hear of people complaining about a poor manual or poor English making instructions unintelligible.

    This is what I call a brand. A Brand you can trust, a brand that's prepared to stand behind its product when they prepared to offer an extended warranty.

    Something I teach when training sales staff is that a client will always discount your price by the extent to which you fail to show the value your product/price deserves.
    cheers

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,448
    Nice Gloat! I think Lincoln makes a good product, not heard of many complaints against them. So which model did you get and what's the first project? Making your own welder cart?
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    North West Indiana
    Posts
    6,098
    Lincoln is a great brand of welders. I have attended classes put on by the Lincoln reps. Lincoln actually has welders and weldors at most if not all motorsports events. They put their machines through their paces utilizing their staff. Congratulations Rob.
    Jon

    God and family, the rest is icing on the cake. I'm so far behind, I think I'm in first place!

    Host of the 2015 FAMILY WOODWORKING GATHERING

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,361
    Congrats on the welder! I hope you like it as much as I like my lincoln.

    There are all kinds of intangibles when buying tools.

    Sometimes its all about needing something to get just that one task done one time.

    Some times there's the the satisfaction you get everytime you use it. Sometimes that satisfaction gets built up from the work you've done to get it to where you want it.

    For example, Bob, my skid steer. I get a smile on my face everytime I use him.

    Right now I'm building a storage shed. The big ole compressor running my cheapo HF Framing nailer puts a smile on my face every time it goes 'Ka-Chunk'! I know it's not a great quality tool, but for the amount I use it, it still works fine.

    Can't wait to see what you make with your welder!
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Amherst, New Hampshire
    Posts
    10,604
    Great review Rob
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
    Posts
    12,256
    Lol my post was not meant as a stealth gloat sorry if it came across that way.

    I was more trying to create awareness to the point as Brent realized of the issues at stake that I feel are often lost when the focus is on price and that is usually connected with products made with low cost production (often offshore) in mind.
    Good brands with credibility don't tend to have this issue but there is a price to pay for it. Its a fair overhead to maintain a good technical library to support a product even more so when u consider local brands have to deal with local legalities which we all know can be a serious challenges ( in Canada just thinking of our differences between Ontario and Quebec can be a challenge for example). In Canada this can mean for a relatively small volume of sales having to have your manual in both French and English or running foul of the law for it.
    I know when a large US based shopping center group was looking to expand in Canada and did, a huge challenge for them in their strategy to bring US speciality stores to Canada was the dual language labeling and here we just talking translation and not even the focus on quality of technical backup that I am thinking of in a machine.
    But like Brent says for one time use heck its often worth the risk especially if you technically or mechanically inclined.

    But I truly admire brands that have managed to remain competitive yet not let go of that value which made them great in the first place a store like Lee Valley and its Brands Veritas come to mind here.

    Sent from my SGH-I337M using Tapatalk
    cheers

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
    Posts
    12,256
    Oh and I picked up the Mig 180. Model.

    Sent from my SGH-I337M using Tapatalk
    cheers

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    East Freeetown, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,020
    I have a Lincoln MIG 410 on my short list.

    Glad to hear the review - thank you

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Southeast Pa
    Posts
    2,019
    Did you get the plain 180 or the 180 C..
    The 180 C seems to have a lot of nice additions...
    Garry
    Last edited by Garry Foster; 04-04-2016 at 04:40 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    new york city burbs
    Posts
    10,188
    you get what you pay for.

    cheap tools might work great for a bit, but you open yourself up to more aggrevation not to mention injuries.
    Human Test Dummy

Similar Threads

  1. Buying Tools in the Winter
    By Cynthia White in forum New Tools
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 11-05-2010, 12:53 PM
  2. Order of Buying Tools for a New Woodworker
    By Cynthia White in forum New Tools
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 11-02-2010, 07:35 PM
  3. Buying hand tools on a budget ...
    By Rob Keeble in forum Neander Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-17-2010, 02:15 PM
  4. Buying lathe tools
    By Chuck Thoits in forum New Tools
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 03-26-2008, 12:31 AM
  5. buying tools online
    By Eddie Kaz in forum New Tools
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 05-11-2007, 07:08 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •