Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: soup stirrer mk 2

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    falcon heights, minnesota
    Posts
    5,610

    soup stirrer mk 2

    as mentioned in another post, at a recent fundraiser, one of the other ladies at the wife's church wanted a similar soup stirrer that i had made for another lady. well, the design has been laid out, the lumber selected, and the lines transferred to the wood. i think i may make the stem of this a bit more slender, not liking too much of what i saw. i may not be in the shop quite yet, but i will be ready when it happens.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 001 first layout.jpg  
    benedictione omnes bene

    www.burroviejowoodworking.com

    check out my etsy store, buroviejowoodworking

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,699


    I'd probably agree on going thinner, its helped the look of my spoons a fair bit but takes a little courage and the willingness to break a few figuring out where the weak points are.

    One thing that helps is to try and to keep the transition points where the grain moves direction strong enough. You can do a few things to help the appearance and keep up the strength.
    • Leaving the center of the piece a bit thicker and thinning the edges gives the illusion of it being thinner than it is, this is also nice because you can sneak up on the final thickness without committing up front.
    • Another technique is moving the position or direction of thickness around to where it doesn't detract from the apparent delicateness. A good example of this type of re-enforcement is how a lot of hand carved spoons have a thin "keel" that goes from the underside of the bottom of the handle onto the bowl of the spoon and provides a re-enforcement point for that point of leverage.


    I'm not sure that the second technique would be easily applicable to a paddle design, but you might be able to do something kind of akin to that and leave a somewhat thicker section in the transition from the handle into the blade but only as an extension of the handle itself (think of it as the handle portion continuing into the blade for a little while).

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,749
    I'll have to try something like this, for making my famous soups. One of the TV chefs years ago used to sell a line of wooden kitchen tools. One was a stirrer that had a couple of large hole in it. I thought this would give a little more action to the stirring, and I think I'll try that. I like your pattern, overall. How long do you make them?
    Cheers,
    Roger


    The other member of Mensa, but not the NRA

    Everyone is a self-made person.

    "The thing about quotes on the internet is that you cannot confirm their veracity" -Abraham Lincoln

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    falcon heights, minnesota
    Posts
    5,610
    this one is about 30 inches long by about 5 inches wide.
    benedictione omnes bene

    www.burroviejowoodworking.com

    check out my etsy store, buroviejowoodworking

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    falcon heights, minnesota
    Posts
    5,610
    now that the shop is open (somewhat), and i can get at my tools, got a bit more done with this today. got it rough cut, then sanded to the lines. tomorrow it will be taking it for a ride on the planer to reduce the thickness a bit.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 002 ready for cutting.jpg   003 rough cut and ready for sanding.jpg   004 sanded to lines.jpg  
    benedictione omnes bene

    www.burroviejowoodworking.com

    check out my etsy store, buroviejowoodworking

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    falcon heights, minnesota
    Posts
    5,610
    got a bit more done today. rounded over all of the edges, drilled the hanger hole, and rounded the edges of that over. all that is left is final sanding and finishing.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 005 edges rounded over.jpg   006 hole drilled.jpg   007 hole rounded over.jpg   008 ready for final sanding and finish.jpg  
    benedictione omnes bene

    www.burroviejowoodworking.com

    check out my etsy store, buroviejowoodworking

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Oceanside, So. Calif. 5 mi. to the ocean
    Posts
    4,944
    Maybe you could use a burning tool and quote the witches at the caldron in Shakespear's McBeth play. I'll bet someone would pay handsomely for that one.

    I hate to admit it but most of Shakespear has dibbled (another use for "dibble"---see thread about dibble) away from my poor old brain..

    It is the Witch's song while stiring the caldron. I was thinking of the first two lines. I think most people would recognize it. Even if they didn't I think it would still go over.

    Double, double toil and trouble;

    Fire burn and caldron bubble.

    Fillet of a fenny snake,

    In the caldron boil and bake;

    Eye of newt and toe of frog,

    Wool of bat and tongue of dog,

    Adder's fork and blind-worm's sting,

    Lizard's leg and howlet's wing,

    For a charm of powerful trouble,

    Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.



    Double, double toil and trouble;

    Fire burn and caldron bubble.

    Cool it with a baboon's blood,

    Then the charm is firm and good.


    Enjoy,
    JimB
    Last edited by Jim C Bradley; 04-17-2016 at 09:36 PM.
    First of all you have to be smarter than the machine.
    VOTING MEMBER

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    falcon heights, minnesota
    Posts
    5,610
    took it for a ride on the planer today after finishing up the dining table top boards. took about 1/3 off the thickness, and rounded off the edges again. now i am quite happy with the fit, feel, weight, and balance. all that is left to do, is sand it a good one, oil it, and fit it with the leather hanger. it will be presented on mother's day.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 009 planed a bit thinner.jpg   010 edges rounded over.jpg  
    benedictione omnes bene

    www.burroviejowoodworking.com

    check out my etsy store, buroviejowoodworking

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,699
    Looking pretty paddleishious (yep I just made that one up, I'm blaming Jim for mentioning Shakespeare who was apt to do such things) there Dan!

    I'd probably go even thinner on the handle but I like to push my luck as loml can verify so YMMV.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    falcon heights, minnesota
    Posts
    5,610
    finished hand sanding it to 220 last night, and hit it with the mineral oil tonight. added the strap, and its all set to be delivered.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 011 sanded and oiled.jpg  
    benedictione omnes bene

    www.burroviejowoodworking.com

    check out my etsy store, buroviejowoodworking

Similar Threads

  1. soup stirrer mk 3
    By Dan Noren in forum Flatwork Project Showcase
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 05-29-2016, 09:28 PM
  2. Taco Soup
    By Mike Stafford in forum The Cook Shack
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-14-2013, 02:56 PM
  3. Won't Hold Soup
    By Vaughn McMillan in forum Lathe Project Showcase
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 10-28-2012, 08:17 AM
  4. Posole - another soup
    By Don Baer in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-17-2011, 12:29 AM
  5. Soup anyone?
    By Steve Southwood in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 05-22-2010, 12:00 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •